Biology

This Sept. 12, 2015, photo provided by Jacqueline Sones shows a Janolus Nudibranch in Bodega Harbor, Calif. A new study reports that dozens of warm-weather species of sea slugs, jellyfish and other marine life migrated into the northern California region over an unusually long two-year period of severe heatwaves. The University of California, Davis report is to be published Tuesday, March 12, 2019, in Scientific Reports. (Jacqueline Sones via AP)
March 12, 2019 - 6:07 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Dozens of species of sea slugs, jellyfish and other marine life from toastier southern waters migrated into the Northern California region over an unusually long two-year period of severe heatwaves, says a new scientific report. The 67 species identified in the report include a...
Read More
This Sept. 12, 2015, photo provided by Jacqueline Sones shows a Janolus Nudibranch in Bodega Harbor, Calif. A new study reports that dozens of warm-weather species of sea slugs, jellyfish and other marine life migrated into the northern California region over an unusually long two-year period of severe heatwaves. The University of California, Davis report is to be published Tuesday, March 12, 2019, in Scientific Reports. (Jacqueline Sones via AP)
March 12, 2019 - 6:05 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A new study reports that dozens of warm-weather species of sea slugs, jellyfish and other marine life migrated into the Northern California region over an unusually long two-year period of severe heatwaves. The University of California, Davis report studying heatwaves in 2014-...
Read More
This 2009 photo provided by AquaBountyTechnologies shows a juvenile salmon raised at the company's hatchery in Fortune, Prince Edward Island, Canada. On Friday, March 8, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it had lifted an alert had that had prevented AquaBounty from importing its salmon eggs to its Indiana facility, where they would be grown before being sold as food. (AquaBountyTechnologies via AP)
March 08, 2019 - 10:06 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday gave the green light to salmon genetically modified to grow about twice as fast as normal, but the company behind it may face legal challenges before the fish can be sold domestically. The Food and Drug Administration said it lifted an alert that had...
Read More
This 2009 photo provided by AquaBountyTechnologies shows a juvenile salmon raised at the company's hatchery in Fortune, Prince Edward Island, Canada. On Friday, March 8, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it had lifted an alert had that had prevented AquaBounty from importing its salmon eggs to its Indiana facility, where they would be grown before being sold as food. (AquaBountyTechnologies via AP)
March 08, 2019 - 5:51 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday gave the green light to salmon genetically modified to grow about twice as fast as normal, but the company behind it may face legal challenges before the fish can be sold domestically. The Food and Drug Administration said it lifted an alert that had...
Read More
This 2009 photo provided by AquaBountyTechnologies shows a juvenile salmon raised at the company's hatchery in Fortune, Prince Edward Island, Canada. On Friday, March 8, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it had lifted an alert had that had prevented AquaBounty from importing its salmon eggs to its Indiana facility, where they would be grown before being sold as food. (AquaBountyTechnologies via AP)
March 08, 2019 - 5:26 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday gave the green light to salmon genetically modified to grow about twice as fast as normal, but the company behind it may face legal challenges before the fish can be sold domestically. The Food and Drug Administration said it lifted an alert had that had...
Read More
March 08, 2019 - 5:19 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday gave the green light to salmon genetically modified to grow about twice as fast as normal, but the company behind it may face legal challenges before the fish can be sold domestically. The Food and Drug Administration said it lifted an alert had that had...
Read More
March 08, 2019 - 5:09 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators are giving the green light to salmon genetically modified to grow about twice as fast as normal. But the fish may still face legal challenges before it can be sold domestically. The Food and Drug Administration on Friday lifted an alert had that had prevented...
Read More
In this Wednesday, March 6, 2019 photo, provided by the NOAA Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, is an entangled subadult humpback whale that was freed of gear by a team of trained responders off Makena Beach, Hawaii. Officials say a number of private boats helped a team of federal responders free a young humpback whale from heavy gauge fishing gear off Hawaii. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said in a joint statement Thursday that the "subadult" humpback was first spotted Wednesday morning by a dive boat off Maui. (Ed Lyman/NOAA Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary via AP)
March 08, 2019 - 1:10 am
HONOLULU (AP) — A number of private boats helped a team of federal responders free a young humpback whale from heavy gauge fishing gear off Hawaii, officials said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said in a joint statement that the "subadult" humpback was first spotted...
Read More
This undated photo provided by Paul Tixier in March 2019 shows a Type D killer whale. Scientists are waiting for test results from a tissue sample, which could give them the DNA evidence to prove the new type is a distinct species. (Paul Tixier/CEBC CNRS/MNHN Paris via AP)
March 07, 2019 - 5:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — For decades, there were tales from fishermen and tourists, even lots of photos, of a mysterious killer whale that just didn't look like all the others, but scientists had never seen one. Now they have. An international team of researchers says they found a couple dozen of these...
Read More
In this undated photo provided by Liran Samuni, chimpanzees in the Taï National Park in the Ivory Coast vocalize with another group nearby. A study released on Thursday, March 6, 2019 highlights the diversity of chimp behaviors within groups _ traditions that are at least in part learned socially, and transmitted from generation to generation. (Liran Samuni/Taï Chimpanzee Project via AP)
March 07, 2019 - 4:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Some chimpanzee groups are stone-throwers. Some use rocks to crack open tree nuts to eat. Others use sticks to fish for algae. As researchers learn more about Homo sapiens' closest living genetic relatives, they are also discovering more about the diversity of behaviors within...
Read More

Pages