Biology

FILE - In this April 19, 2005 file photo, a Canada lynx heads into the Rio Grande National Forest after being released near Creede, Colo. Wildlife officials said Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, the Canada lynx no longer needs special protections in the United States. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will begin drafting a rule to revoke the animal's threatened species status, which has been in place since 2000. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
January 11, 2018 - 7:11 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Wildlife officials in the United States declared Canada lynx recovered on Thursday and said the snow-loving wild cats no longer need special protections following steps to preserve their habitat. The Fish and Wildlife Service said it will begin drafting a rule to revoke the...
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FILE - In this April 19, 2005 file photo, a Canada lynx heads into the Rio Grande National Forest after being released near Creede, Colo. Wildlife officials said Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, the Canada lynx no longer needs special protections in the United States. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will begin drafting a rule to revoke the animal's threatened species status, which has been in place since 2000. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
January 11, 2018 - 6:03 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Wildlife officials in the United States declared Canada lynx recovered on Thursday and said the snow-loving wild cats no longer need special protections following steps to preserve their habitat. The Fish and Wildlife Service said it will begin drafting a rule to revoke the...
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January 09, 2018 - 7:55 am
BRUNSWICK, Maine (AP) — A Maine marine biologist says footage of her swimming with a humpback whale shows the large mammal protecting her from a tiger shark. Nan Hauser, president of the Center for Cetacean Research and Conservation and a Brunswick resident, says she uploaded footage of her...
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Rep. Steve Alford, R-Ulysses, sits in the Kansas House at the start of the 2018 legislative session Monday, Jan. 8, 2018. Alford, arguing against the legalization of any use of marijuana, suggested that it and other drugs were originally outlawed in part because blacks were "basically users" and "responded worst" to the drugs because of their "character makeup _ their genetics and that." Alford made the comments Saturday during a public meeting at a hospital in Garden City. (Thad Allton/Topeka Capital-Journal via AP)
January 08, 2018 - 6:55 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A white Kansas state lawmaker arguing against the legalization of marijuana suggested that it and other drugs were originally outlawed in part because blacks were predisposed to abusing drugs because of their "character makeup — their genetics and that." State Rep. Steve Alford...
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Rep. Steve Alford, R-Ulysses, sits in the Kansas House at the start of the 2018 legislative session Monday, Jan. 8, 2018. Alford, arguing against the legalization of any use of marijuana, suggested that it and other drugs were originally outlawed in part because blacks were "basically users" and "responded worst" to the drugs because of their "character makeup _ their genetics and that." Alford made the comments Saturday during a public meeting at a hospital in Garden City. (Thad Allton/Topeka Capital-Journal via AP)
January 08, 2018 - 5:33 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A white Kansas state lawmaker arguing against the legalization of any use of marijuana suggested that it and other drugs were originally outlawed in part because blacks were "basically users" and "responded worst" to the drugs because of their "character makeup — their genetics...
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January 08, 2018 - 3:47 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A white Kansas state lawmaker arguing against the legalization of any use of marijuana suggested that it and other drugs were originally outlawed in part because blacks were "basically users" and "responded worst" to the drugs because of their "character makeup — their genetics...
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January 08, 2018 - 3:46 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A white Kansas state lawmaker arguing against the legalization of any use of marijuana suggested that it and other drugs were originally outlawed in part because blacks were "basically users" and "responded worst" to the drugs because of their "character makeup — their genetics...
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This July 2010 photo provided by NOAA shows bleached corals at Ko Racha Yai, Thailand. A study released on Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018 finds that severe bleaching outbreaks are hitting coral reefs four times more often they used to a few decades earlier. (Mark Eakin/NOAA via AP)
January 04, 2018 - 4:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is making the world's oceans sicker, depleting them of oxygen and harming delicate coral reefs more often, two studies show. The lower oxygen levels are making marine life far more vulnerable, the researchers said. Oxygen is crucial for nearly all life in the oceans...
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Allan Harris
June 18, 2017 - 6:06 am
(WBEN/AP) New York is becoming the latest U.S. state to let police hunt for suspects by identifying their relatives through DNA, after officials voted to allow a practice that authorities call a crime-solver but civil libertarians consider a DNA dragnet. The technique, known as familial DNA...
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This 2009 colorized microscope image made available by the Sickle Cell Foundation of Georgia via the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a sickle cell, left, and normal red blood cells of a patient with sickle cell anemia. Researchers say a French teen who was given gene therapy for sickle cell disease more than two years ago now has enough properly working red blood cells to dodge the effects of the disorder. The case is detailed in the March 2, 2017 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. (Janice Haney Carr/CDC/Sickle Cell Foundation of Georgia via AP)
March 01, 2017 - 5:02 pm
Researchers say a French teen who was given gene therapy for sickle cell disease more than two years ago now has enough properly working red blood cells to dodge the effects of the disorder. The teen was the first in the world to get the treatment for sickle cell, which affects 90,000 Americans,...
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