Biology

In this Wednesday, March 6, 2019 photo, provided by the NOAA Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, is an entangled subadult humpback whale that was freed of gear by a team of trained responders off Makena Beach, Hawaii. Officials say a number of private boats helped a team of federal responders free a young humpback whale from heavy gauge fishing gear off Hawaii. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said in a joint statement Thursday that the "subadult" humpback was first spotted Wednesday morning by a dive boat off Maui. (Ed Lyman/NOAA Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary via AP)
March 08, 2019 - 1:10 am
HONOLULU (AP) — A number of private boats helped a team of federal responders free a young humpback whale from heavy gauge fishing gear off Hawaii, officials said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said in a joint statement that the "subadult" humpback was first spotted...
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This undated photo provided by Paul Tixier in March 2019 shows a Type D killer whale. Scientists are waiting for test results from a tissue sample, which could give them the DNA evidence to prove the new type is a distinct species. (Paul Tixier/CEBC CNRS/MNHN Paris via AP)
March 07, 2019 - 5:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — For decades, there were tales from fishermen and tourists, even lots of photos, of a mysterious killer whale that just didn't look like all the others, but scientists had never seen one. Now they have. An international team of researchers says they found a couple dozen of these...
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In this undated photo provided by Liran Samuni, chimpanzees in the Taï National Park in the Ivory Coast vocalize with another group nearby. A study released on Thursday, March 6, 2019 highlights the diversity of chimp behaviors within groups _ traditions that are at least in part learned socially, and transmitted from generation to generation. (Liran Samuni/Taï Chimpanzee Project via AP)
March 07, 2019 - 4:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Some chimpanzee groups are stone-throwers. Some use rocks to crack open tree nuts to eat. Others use sticks to fish for algae. As researchers learn more about Homo sapiens' closest living genetic relatives, they are also discovering more about the diversity of behaviors within...
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In this undated photo provided by Liran Samuni, chimpanzees in the Taï National Park in the Ivory Coast vocalize with another group nearby. A study released on Thursday, March 6, 2019 highlights the diversity of chimp behaviors within groups _ traditions that are at least in part learned socially, and transmitted from generation to generation. (Liran Samuni/Taï Chimpanzee Project via AP)
March 07, 2019 - 4:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Some chimpanzee groups are stone-throwers. Some use rocks to crack open tree nuts to eat. Others use sticks to fish for algae. As researchers learn more about Homo sapiens' closest living genetic relatives, they are also discovering more about the diversity of behaviors within...
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This undated photo provided by Paul Tixier in March 2019 shows a Type D killer whale. Scientists are waiting for test results from a tissue sample, which could give them the DNA evidence to prove the new type is a distinct species. (Paul Tixier/CEBC CNRS/MNHN Paris via AP)
March 07, 2019 - 3:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists say they've found a new type of killer whale off the coast of Chile that looks distinctly different from other orcas. The whale's signature white eye patch is smaller. Their heads are a bit more rounded than normal killer whales and their dorsal fins are more narrow and...
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In this photo provided by Sea Shepherd organization, crew members of a Sea Shepherd ship pull an illegal net laid out by poachers in the Gulf of California, Monday March 5, 2018. Experts said Wednesday that at most only 22 vaquitas remain in the Gulf of California, where a grim, increasingly violent battle is playing out between emboldened fishermen and the environmentalist group Sea Shepherd for the smallest and most endangered porpoise in the world. (Sea Shepherd via AP)
March 06, 2019 - 9:56 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Experts said Wednesday that at most only 22 vaquitas remain in the Gulf of California, where a grim, increasingly violent battle is playing out between emboldened fishermen and the last line of defense for the smallest and most endangered porpoise in the world. Jorge Urban, a...
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FILE - In this July 8, 2017 file photo, journalists and World Wildlife Fund employees and volunteers stand before papier mache replicas of the critically endangered porpoise known as the "vaquita marina" during an event in front of the National Palace calling on the Mexican government to take additional steps to protect the world's smallest marine mammal, in Mexico City. Experts said Wednesday, March 6, 2019 that only 22 "vaquitas" remain in the Gulf of California, where a grim, increasingly violent battle is playing out between emboldened fishermen and the last line of defense for the smallest and most endangered porpoise in the world. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)
March 06, 2019 - 8:38 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Experts said Wednesday that at most only 22 vaquitas remain in the Gulf of California, where a grim, increasingly violent battle is playing out between emboldened fishermen and the last line of defense for the smallest and most endangered porpoise in the world. Jorge Urban, a...
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Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 05, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A London man appears to be free of the virus that causes AIDS after a stem cell transplant, the second success including the "Berlin patient," doctors reported. The therapy had an early success with Timothy Ray Brown, a U.S. man treated in Germany who is 12 years post-transplant and...
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Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 05, 2019 - 5:16 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A London man appears to be free of the virus that causes AIDS after a stem cell transplant, the second success including the "Berlin patient," doctors reported. The therapy had an early success with Timothy Ray Brown, a U.S. man treated in Germany who is 12 years post-transplant and...
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Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 05, 2019 - 5:13 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A London man appears to be free of the virus that causes AIDS after a stem cell transplant, the second success including the "Berlin patient," doctors reported. The therapy had an early success with Timothy Ray Brown, a U.S. man treated in Germany who is 12 years post-transplant and...
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