Biology

In this undated photo provided by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, cloned monkeys Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua sit together with a fabric toy. For the first time, researchers have used the cloning method that produced Dolly the sheep to create two healthy monkeys, potentially bringing scientists closer to being able to do that with humans. (Sun Qiang and Poo Muming/Chinese Academy of Sciences via AP)
January 24, 2018 - 4:50 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time, researchers have used the cloning technique that produced Dolly the sheep to create healthy monkeys, bringing science an important step closer to being able to do the same with humans. Since Dolly's birth in 1996, scientists have cloned nearly two dozen kinds of...
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In this undated photo provided by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, cloned monkeys Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua sit together with a fabric toy. For the first time, researchers have used the cloning method that produced Dolly the sheep to create two healthy monkeys, potentially bringing scientists closer to being able to do that with humans. (Sun Qiang and Poo Muming/Chinese Academy of Sciences via AP)
January 24, 2018 - 2:44 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time, researchers have used the cloning method that produced Dolly the sheep to create healthy monkeys, bringing science an important step closer to being able to do the same with humans. Since Dolly's birth in 1996, scientists have cloned nearly two dozen kinds of...
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This image from video provided by the Chinese Academy of Sciences in January 2018 shows cloned monkeys Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua in Shanghai, China. Researchers said the genetically identical long-tailed macaques are the first primate clones made by by the method that produced Dolly the sheep. (Qiang Sun and Mu-ming Poo/Chinese Academy of Sciences via AP)
January 24, 2018 - 12:27 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time, researchers have used the cloning method that produced Dolly the sheep to create two healthy monkeys, bringing science an important step closer to being able to do the same with humans. Since Dolly's birth in 1996, scientists have cloned nearly two dozen kinds of...
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January 18, 2018 - 1:54 pm
SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — Scientists watching for baby right whales off the Southeast U.S. coast have yet to spot a single newborn seven weeks into the endangered species' calving season — the longest researchers have gone without any sightings in nearly 30 years. Bad weather that has limited efforts to...
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This 2011 photo from a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service motion-activated camera shows an elephant seal in the Channel Islands National Park off the coast of Southern California. Motion-detecting wildlife cameras devices are getting smaller, cheaper and more reliable, and scientists across the United State are using them to document elusive creatures like never before. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
January 17, 2018 - 2:15 pm
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — How does a bighorn sheep say "cheese?" Some charismatic critters caught by motion-detecting wildlife cameras seem to know how to strike a pose. But it's not just show business. As these devices get ever smaller, cheaper and more reliable, scientists across the U.S. are using...
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FILE - In this April 19, 2005 file photo, a Canada lynx heads into the Rio Grande National Forest after being released near Creede, Colo. Wildlife officials said Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, the Canada lynx no longer needs special protections in the United States. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will begin drafting a rule to revoke the animal's threatened species status, which has been in place since 2000. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
January 11, 2018 - 7:11 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Wildlife officials in the United States declared Canada lynx recovered on Thursday and said the snow-loving wild cats no longer need special protections following steps to preserve their habitat. The Fish and Wildlife Service said it will begin drafting a rule to revoke the...
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FILE - In this April 19, 2005 file photo, a Canada lynx heads into the Rio Grande National Forest after being released near Creede, Colo. Wildlife officials said Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, the Canada lynx no longer needs special protections in the United States. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will begin drafting a rule to revoke the animal's threatened species status, which has been in place since 2000. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
January 11, 2018 - 6:03 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Wildlife officials in the United States declared Canada lynx recovered on Thursday and said the snow-loving wild cats no longer need special protections following steps to preserve their habitat. The Fish and Wildlife Service said it will begin drafting a rule to revoke the...
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January 09, 2018 - 7:55 am
BRUNSWICK, Maine (AP) — A Maine marine biologist says footage of her swimming with a humpback whale shows the large mammal protecting her from a tiger shark. Nan Hauser, president of the Center for Cetacean Research and Conservation and a Brunswick resident, says she uploaded footage of her...
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Rep. Steve Alford, R-Ulysses, sits in the Kansas House at the start of the 2018 legislative session Monday, Jan. 8, 2018. Alford, arguing against the legalization of any use of marijuana, suggested that it and other drugs were originally outlawed in part because blacks were "basically users" and "responded worst" to the drugs because of their "character makeup _ their genetics and that." Alford made the comments Saturday during a public meeting at a hospital in Garden City. (Thad Allton/Topeka Capital-Journal via AP)
January 08, 2018 - 6:55 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A white Kansas state lawmaker arguing against the legalization of marijuana suggested that it and other drugs were originally outlawed in part because blacks were predisposed to abusing drugs because of their "character makeup — their genetics and that." State Rep. Steve Alford...
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Rep. Steve Alford, R-Ulysses, sits in the Kansas House at the start of the 2018 legislative session Monday, Jan. 8, 2018. Alford, arguing against the legalization of any use of marijuana, suggested that it and other drugs were originally outlawed in part because blacks were "basically users" and "responded worst" to the drugs because of their "character makeup _ their genetics and that." Alford made the comments Saturday during a public meeting at a hospital in Garden City. (Thad Allton/Topeka Capital-Journal via AP)
January 08, 2018 - 5:33 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A white Kansas state lawmaker arguing against the legalization of any use of marijuana suggested that it and other drugs were originally outlawed in part because blacks were "basically users" and "responded worst" to the drugs because of their "character makeup — their genetics...
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