Biology

Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 05, 2019 - 6:02 am
SEATTLE (AP) — A London man appears to be free of the AIDS virus after a stem cell transplant, the second success including the "Berlin patient," doctors reported. The therapy had an early success with Timothy Ray Brown, a U.S. man treated in Germany who is 12 years post-transplant and still free...
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Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 04, 2019 - 8:27 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Researchers say a London man appears to be free of the AIDS virus after a stem cell transplant. It's the second such success including "Berlin patient" Timothy Ray Brown. Such transplants are dangerous and have failed in other patients. The new findings were published online Monday...
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March 04, 2019 - 7:25 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Researchers say a London man appears to be free of the AIDS virus after a stem cell transplant. It's the second such success since "Berlin patient" Timothy Ray Brown more than a decade ago. Such transplants are dangerous and have failed in other patients. The new findings were...
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A scientist at the NY Genome Center in New York demonstrates equipment used in single-cell RNA analysis on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. Until recently, trying to study key traits of cells from people and other animals often meant analyzing bulk samples of tissue, producing an average of results from many cell types. But scientists have developed techniques that let them directly study the DNA codes, and its chemical cousin RNA, the activity of genes and other traits of individual cells. (AP Photo/Malcolm Ritter)
March 04, 2019 - 6:29 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Did you hear what happened when Bill Gates walked into a bar? Everybody there immediately became millionaires — on average. That joke about a very rich man is an old one among statisticians. So why did Peter Smibert use it to explain a revolution in biology? Because it shows...
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A scientist at the NY Genome Center in New York demonstrates equipment used in single-cell RNA analysis on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. Until recently, trying to study key traits of cells from people and other animals often meant analyzing bulk samples of tissue, producing an average of results from many cell types. But scientists have developed techniques that let them directly study the DNA codes, and its chemical cousin RNA, the activity of genes and other traits of individual cells. (AP Photo/Malcolm Ritter)
March 04, 2019 - 1:14 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Did you hear what happened when Bill Gates walked into a bar? Everybody there immediately became millionaires — on average. That joke about a very rich man is an old one among statisticians. So why did Peter Smibert use it to explain a revolution in biology? Because it shows...
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In this Feb. 21, 2019 photo, provided by UC Santa Barbara, Jessica Nielsen, a conservation specialist, examines a beached hoodwinker sunfish at at Coal Oil Point Reserve in Santa Barbara, Calif. (Thomas Turner/UC Santa Barbara via AP)
March 01, 2019 - 5:12 pm
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (AP) — A 7-foot (215-centimeter) sea creature that washed ashore in Southern California has been identified as a hoodwinker sunfish, a recently identified rare species thought to live in the Southern Hemisphere. The University of California, Santa Barbara, said an intern...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018, file photo, Zhou Xiaoqin installs a fine glass pipette into a sperm injection microscope in preparation for injecting embryos with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. China has unveiled draft regulations on gene-editing and other new biomedical technologies it considers to be "high-risk." The measures follow claims in November 2018 by Chinese scientist He Jiankui that he helped make the world's first genetically-edited babies. That roiled the global science community and elicited widespread outcry over the procedure's ethical implications. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
February 27, 2019 - 3:29 am
BEIJING (AP) — China has unveiled draft regulations on gene editing and other potentially risky biomedical technologies after a Chinese scientist's claim of helping to create gene-edited babies roiled the global science community. Under the proposed measures released Tuesday, technology involving...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018, file photo, Zhou Xiaoqin installs a fine glass pipette into a sperm injection microscope in preparation for injecting embryos with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. China has unveiled draft regulations on gene-editing and other new biomedical technologies it considers to be "high-risk." The measures follow claims in November 2018 by Chinese scientist He Jiankui that he helped make the world's first genetically-edited babies. That roiled the global science community and elicited widespread outcry over the procedure's ethical implications. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
February 27, 2019 - 1:49 am
BEIJING (AP) — China has unveiled draft regulations on gene editing and other potentially risky biomedical technologies after a Chinese scientist's claim of helping to create gene-edited babies roiled the global science community. Under the proposed measures released Tuesday, technology involving...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018, file photo, Zhou Xiaoqin installs a fine glass pipette into a sperm injection microscope in preparation for injecting embryos with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. China has unveiled draft regulations on gene-editing and other new biomedical technologies it considers to be "high-risk." The measures follow claims in November 2018 by Chinese scientist He Jiankui that he helped make the world's first genetically-edited babies. That roiled the global science community and elicited widespread outcry over the procedure's ethical implications. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
February 27, 2019 - 12:03 am
BEIJING (AP) — China has unveiled draft regulations on gene-editing and other potentially risky new biomedical technologies after a Chinese scientist's claim of helping to create gene-edited babies roiled the global science community. Under the proposed measures released Tuesday, technology...
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In this undated photo issued by University of Bristol, England, showing a horse wearing a zebra striped coat. Scientists from the University of Bristol and the University of California at Davis, dressed horses in black-and-white Zebra type striped coats for part of their research, offering evidence that zebra stripes provide protection from blood-sucking insects that spread diseases. (University of Bristol and University of California at Davis via AP)
February 21, 2019 - 1:12 pm
LONDON (AP) — Zebra stripes are dazzling — particularly to flies. That's the conclusion of scientists from the University of Bristol and the University of California at Davis who dressed horses in black-and-white striped coats to help determine why zebras have stripes. The researchers found that...
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