Biology

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2003, file photo, Rep. Stephanie Stuckey Benfield, D-Decatur, promotes the breast cancer prevention stamp from the well on the floor of the House in Atlanta. Countless breast cancer patients in the future will be spared millions of dollars of chemotherapy thanks in part to something that millions of Americans did that cost them just pennies: bought a postage stamp. Proceeds from the U.S. Postal Service's breast cancer stamp enabled a landmark study that showed which women need chemo and which do not. (AP Photo/Ric Feld, File)
June 04, 2018 - 12:03 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Countless breast cancer patients in the future will be spared millions of dollars of chemotherapy thanks in part to something that millions of Americans did that cost them just pennies: bought a postage stamp. Proceeds from the U.S. Postal Service's breast cancer stamp put...
Read More
In this Thursday, May 24, 2018 photo, Adine Usher, 78, meets with breast cancer study leader Dr. Joseph Sparano at the Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx borough of New York. Usher was one of about 10,000 participants in the study which shows women at low or intermediate risk for breast cancer recurrence may safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of survival. (AP Photo/Kathy Young)
June 03, 2018 - 4:20 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, doctors are reporting from a landmark study that used genetic testing to gauge each patient's risk. The study is the largest ever done...
Read More
In this Thursday, May 24, 2018 photo, Adine Usher, 78, meets with breast cancer study leader Dr. Joseph Sparano at the Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx borough of New York. Usher was one of about 10,000 participants in the study which shows women at low or intermediate risk for breast cancer recurrence may safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of survival. (AP Photo/Kathy Young)
June 03, 2018 - 7:32 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, doctors are reporting from a landmark study that used genetic testing to gauge each patient's risk. The study is the largest ever done...
Read More
Westley Sholes, 78, a retired health care manager poses for a picture at his home in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., on Wednesday, May 30, 2018. Results from his first prostate cancer scan were suspicious and the second done three months later detected early cancer. That was 20 years ago; Sholes had surgery and is doing well. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
June 01, 2018 - 5:35 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Black men with advanced prostate cancer fared surprisingly well in two new studies that challenge current thinking about racial disparities in the disease. Blacks are more likely to get prostate cancer and to die from it than whites, but the new research suggests getting access to...
Read More
May 25, 2018 - 5:44 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Scientists who track pollution have discovered traces of the pain reliever oxycodone in some Puget Sound mussels. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife obtained clean mussels from Penn Cove on Whidbey Island and put them in different areas to test for water contamination, KIRO-...
Read More
May 14, 2018 - 9:53 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — In a story May 13 about lobster shell strength, The Associated Press reported erroneously that marine biogeochemist Justin Ries attributed the collapse of the southern New England lobster fishery to shell disease. He attributed it to overfishing and population shifts caused...
Read More
May 09, 2018 - 7:58 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Federal prosecutors in California and Florida have sued to stop two companies from providing stem cell treatments, alleging the clinics marketed their procedures as remedies for ailments including cancer and heart disease without proof of safety and efficacy. The Justice...
Read More
This June 2017 family photo shows Pete Canfield, of Spokane, Wash., in Newport Beach, Calif. In April 2017, he had an experimental stem cell treatment at a Scottsdale, Ariz. clinic for chronic lung disease. His GoFundMe campaign had few donors, so he paid most of the $6,000 cost himself. He said the treatment did not work and his disease has progressed. (Courtesy Pete Canfield via AP)
May 08, 2018 - 1:22 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — They're the tech-age version of donor jars at the diner: crowdfunding websites that aim to link ailing people with strangers willing to help pay for medical treatment. But new research suggests duped patients sometimes crowdfund to pay for bogus stem cell treatments. A study...
Read More
This June 2017 family photo shows Pete Canfield, of Spokane, Wash., in Newport Beach, Calif. In April 2017, he had an experimental stem cell treatment at a Scottsdale, Ariz. clinic for chronic lung disease. His GoFundMe campaign had few donors, so he paid most of the $6,000 cost himself. He said the treatment did not work and his disease has progressed. (Courtesy Pete Canfield via AP)
May 08, 2018 - 11:14 am
CHICAGO (AP) — They're the tech-age version of donor jars at the diner: crowdfunding websites that aim to link ailing people with strangers willing to help pay for medical treatment. But new research suggests duped patients sometimes crowdfund to pay for bogus stem cell treatments. A study...
Read More
May 08, 2018 - 11:00 am
CHICAGO (AP) — New research suggests duped patients sometimes use crowdfunding websites to pay for bogus stem cell treatments in campaigns that end up benefiting only the providers. The study focused on for-profit clinics claiming bogus benefits from stem-cell treatments for lung disease, Parkinson...
Read More

Pages