Biology

In this 2017 photo provided by Simon Pierce, Jonathan Green checks on a fin-mounted satellite tag on a whale shark in the Galapagos Islands area of Ecuador. Despite typically being bigger than a double-decker bus, the elusive whale shark has only tiny, almost useless teeth. It's also one of the least understood animals in the ocean. (simonjpierce.com via AP)
February 28, 2018 - 3:09 am
GALAPAGOS ISLANDS, Ecuador (AP) — Scientists have spent time diving with whale sharks in the Galapagos Islands to help solve some of the most enduring mysteries about the biggest shark in the sea. Despite typically being bigger than a double-decker bus, the elusive whale shark has only tiny, almost...
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February 25, 2018 - 10:57 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A group of scientists says beech trees are dominating the woodlands of the northeastern United States as the climate changes, and that could be bad news for forests. The scientists are from the University of Maine and Indiana's Purdue University and say the move toward beech-...
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February 23, 2018 - 4:18 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story Feb. 22 about the global extent of commercial fishing, The Associated Press erroneously included whales among the species caught with longline fishing. A corrected version of the story is below: Satellites see big fishing's footprint on the high seas A new global study...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice shows death row inmate Thomas Whitaker. The Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles on Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018, unanimously recommended the death sentence of Whitaker be commuted to life. Whitaker is set for lethal injection Thursday, Feb. 22, for masterminding the fatal shootings of his mother and brother at their suburban Houston home in 2003. (Texas Department of Criminal Justice via AP, File)
February 22, 2018 - 7:46 pm
HUNTSVILLE, Texas (AP) — Texas Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday spared the life of a convicted killer shortly before the man's scheduled execution for masterminding the fatal shootings of his mother and brother. In sparing the life of Thomas "Bart" Whitaker about an hour before he was scheduled for...
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In this Aug. 14, 2017 photo, Marie Kesten Zahn, an archaeologist and education coordinator at the Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth, Mass., probes the concretion surrounding a leg bone that was salvaged from the Whydah shipwreck off the coast of Wellfleet on Cape Cod. Researchers are working to determine if the remains belong to Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy, the captain of the ship. (Merrily Cassidy/Cape Cod Times via AP)
February 19, 2018 - 7:56 pm
YARMOUTH, Mass. (AP) — Researchers are working to use DNA to identify whether a human bone recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck belongs to the infamous pirate Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy. The Whydah (WIH'-duh) Pirate Museum in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, publicly displayed the bone Monday. It was found...
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In this Aug. 14, 2017 photo, Marie Kesten Zahn, an archaeologist and education coordinator at the Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth, Mass., probes the concretion surrounding a leg bone that was salvaged from the Whydah shipwreck off the coast of Wellfleet on Cape Cod. Researchers are working to determine if the remains belong to Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy, the captain of the ship. (Merrily Cassidy/Cape Cod Times via AP)
February 19, 2018 - 5:02 pm
YARMOUTH, Mass. (AP) — Researchers say they're working to use DNA to identify whether a human bone recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck belongs to the infamous pirate Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy. The Whydah (WIH'-duh) Pirate Museum in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, publicly displayed the bone Monday. The...
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In this Aug. 14, 2017 photo, Marie Kesten Zahn, an archaeologist and education coordinator at the Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth, Mass., probes the concretion surrounding a leg bone that was salvaged from the Whydah shipwreck off the coast of Wellfleet on Cape Cod. Researchers are working to determine if the remains belong to Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy, the captain of the ship. (Merrily Cassidy/Cape Cod Times via AP)
February 18, 2018 - 10:53 pm
YARMOUTH, Mass. (AP) — Researchers are set to discuss their efforts to determine whether human bones recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck are those of the infamous pirate Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy. The Whydah Pirate Museum in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, says it also will publicly display the bones for...
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FILE- In this October 2017 file photo, a black bear walks in Granite Basin, amid low-lying blueberry thickets, in Juneau, Alaska. A study of bears and berries has determined that the big animals are the main dispersers of fruit seeds in southeast Alaska. The study by Oregon State University researchers says it's the first instance of a temperate plant being primarily dispersed by mammals through their excrement rather than by birds. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)
February 17, 2018 - 1:20 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Does a bear leave scat in the woods? The answer is obvious but the effects on an ecosystem may not be. A study by Oregon State University researchers concludes that brown and black bears, and not birds, as commonly thought, are primary distributers of small fruit seeds in...
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In this 2014 image from a remote camera trap provided by Taal Levi, a black bear eats devil's club berries near Haines, Alaska. A study of bears and berries has determined that the big animals are the main dispersers of fruit seeds in southeast Alaska. The study by Oregon State University researchers says it's the first instance of a temperate plant being primarily dispersed by mammals through their excrement rather than by birds. (Taal Levi and Laurie Harrer via AP)
February 17, 2018 - 12:12 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Does a bear scat in the woods? The answer is obvious but the effects on an ecosystem may not be. A study by Oregon State University researchers concludes that brown and black bears, and not birds, as commonly thought, are primary distributers of small fruit seeds in...
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In this 2014 image from a remote camera trap provided by Taal Levi, a black bear eats devil's club berries near Haines, Alaska. A study of bears and berries has determined that the big animals are the main dispersers of fruit seeds in southeast Alaska. The study by Oregon State University researchers says it's the first instance of a temperate plant being primarily dispersed by mammals through their excrement rather than by birds. (Taal Levi and Laurie Harrer via AP)
February 17, 2018 - 11:30 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A study of bears and berries has determined that the big animals are the main dispersers of fruit seeds in southeast Alaska. The study by Oregon State University researchers says it's the first instance of a temperate plant being primarily dispersed by mammals through their...
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