Biology

FILE - In this May 10, 2012, file photo, a doctor holds Truvada pills at her office in San Francisco. New research shows more promise for using AIDS treatment drugs, such as Truvada, as a prevention tool, to help keep uninfected people from catching HIV during sex with a partner who has the virus. Truvada has been shown to help prevent infection when one partner has the virus and one does not, but the evidence so far has been strongest for male-female couples. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
July 24, 2018 - 3:25 am
New research shows more promise for using AIDS treatment drugs as a prevention tool, to help keep uninfected people from catching HIV during sex with a partner who has the virus. In one study, there were no infections among gay men who used a two-drug combo pill either daily or just before and...
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FILE - This undated colorized transmission electron micrograph image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows an Ebola virion. A Liberian woman who probably caught Ebola in 2014 may have infected three relatives a year after she first fell sick, doctors reported in a study published Monday, July 23, 2018. (Frederick Murphy/CDC via AP, File)
July 23, 2018 - 6:57 pm
LONDON (AP) — A Liberian woman who probably caught Ebola in 2014 may have infected three relatives a year after she first fell sick, doctors reported in a study published Monday. There have been previous instances of men spreading Ebola to women via sexual transmission — the virus can survive in...
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July 19, 2018 - 2:26 pm
DENVER (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday proposed ending automatic protections for threatened animal and plant species and limiting habitat safeguards that are meant to shield recovering species from harm. Administration officials said the new rules would advance conservation by...
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Graphic shows results of AP-NORC Center poll on attitudes toward genetic testing; 2c x 6 inches; 96.3 mm x 152 mm;
July 19, 2018 - 11:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Curiosity about ancestry is the main reason Americans seek genetic testing. But large segments of the public also want to know if they're at risk for various medical conditions — even if they can't do anything about it. A poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public...
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This July 2018, photo provided by Charlotte Murphy shows poison parsnip in Bennington, Vt. Murphy was left with severe burns and blisters on her legs after encountering the invasive species of plant in Vermont. (Charlotte Murphy via AP)
July 18, 2018 - 7:09 pm
ESSEX, Vt. (AP) — A woman was left with severe burns and blisters on her legs after encountering an invasive species of plant in Vermont. Charlotte Murphy says she developed painful blisters overnight after brushing against poison parsnip. Murphy says the blisters got so bad she had to go to the...
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July 18, 2018 - 11:19 am
ESSEX, Vt. (AP) — A woman was left with severe burns and blisters on her legs after encountering an invasive species of plant in Vermont. Charlotte Murphy says she developed painful blisters overnight after brushing against poison parsnip. Murphy says the blisters got so bad she had to go to the...
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July 17, 2018 - 2:41 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Scientists no longer have to collect poop to get key data on the health of endangered right whales. A new study indicates that under the right conditions, scientist can get real-time hormonal data by collecting the spray from whales' blowholes. Researchers with the Anderson...
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In this photo taken Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, a woman and child walks alongside a giant baobab tree in Chimanimani, Zimbabwe. Africa's ancient baobab, with it's distinctive swollen trunk and known as the "tree of life," is under a new mysterious threat, with some of the largest and oldest dying abruptly in recent years. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
July 12, 2018 - 6:43 am
CROOKS CORNER, South Africa (AP) — Africa's ancient baobab, with its distinctive swollen trunk and known as the "tree of life," is under a new and mysterious threat, with some of the largest and oldest dying abruptly in recent years. Nine of the 13 oldest baobabs, aged between 1,000 and 2,500 years...
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FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2016, file photo, a xoloitzcuintli is shown in the ring during the non-sporting group competition at the140th Westminster Kennel Club dog show, at Madison Square Garden in New York. A new study published Thursday, July 5, 2018, in the journal Science provides fresh evidence that the first dogs of North America all but disappeared after the arrival of Europeans and left little to no trace in modern American dogs. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
July 05, 2018 - 2:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new study provides fresh evidence that the first dogs of North America all but disappeared after the arrival of Europeans. An international team of researchers says the only surviving legacy appears to be a cancer that afflicts dogs that arose from the cells of a dog that lived...
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This Thursday, March 29, 2018 photo shows a cup of coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles. A 10-year study released on Monday, July 2, 2018 shows that coffee drinkers had a lower risk of death than abstainers, including those who downed at least eight cups daily. The benefit was seen with instant, ground, decaf, and in people with genetic glitches affecting how their bodies use caffeine. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
July 02, 2018 - 11:02 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Go ahead and have that cup of coffee, maybe even several more. New research shows it may boost chances for a longer life, even for those who down at least eight cups daily. In a study of nearly half-a-million British adults, coffee drinkers had a slightly lower risk of death over 10...
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