Biology

This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows a mature northern fur seal standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 8:31 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location: a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows northern fur seal pups standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 7:08 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location: a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
Read More
This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows northern fur seal pups standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 1:17 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location _ a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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October 03, 2019 - 11:54 am
BEDFORD, N.H. (AP) — A young moose that got stuck in a New Hampshire swimming pool has been successfully coaxed out. New Hampshire Fish and Game Department biologists and conservation officers were called to a Bedford home Tuesday to help remove the young bull. He was in the water for several hours...
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FILE -In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, a baby dugong named Marium swims near the hull of a boat off Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. A top marine biologist is urging Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an endangered sea mammal, after their death toll for the year has already climbed to a record 21. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)
October 03, 2019 - 6:30 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A top marine biologist has urged Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an imperiled sea mammal, after their death toll for the year in Thai waters has already climbed to a record 21. Thon Thamrongnawasawat said on his Facebook page that the carcass of a...
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FILE -In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, a baby dugong named Marium swims near the hull of a boat off Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. A top marine biologist is urging Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an endangered sea mammal, after their death toll for the year has already climbed to a record 21. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)
October 03, 2019 - 5:19 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A top marine biologist has urged Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an imperiled sea mammal, after their death toll for the year in Thai waters has already climbed to a record 21. Thon Thamrongnawasawat said on his Facebook page that the carcass of a...
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FILE -In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, a baby dugong named Marium swims near the hull of a boat off Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. A top marine biologist is urging Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an endangered sea mammal, after their death toll for the year has already climbed to a record 21. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)
October 03, 2019 - 4:37 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A top marine biologist is urging Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an endangered sea mammal, after their death toll for the year has already climbed to a record 21. Thon Thamrongnawasawat said on his Facebook page that the carcass of a dugong was...
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October 03, 2019 - 4:30 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A top marine biologist is urging Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an endangered sea mammal, after their death toll for the year has already climbed to a record 21. Thon Thamrongnawasawat said on his Facebook page that the carcass of a dugong was...
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This image made from the National Academy of Sciences website on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019 shows part of a video of people discussing gene editing and designer babies. The video gives the inaccurate impression that gene editing can give positive traits without any potential downsides _ “the definition of hubris,” said Harvard Medical School dean Dr. George Q. Daley, who also has been involved in academy work. “We are not there yet.” (National Academy of Sciences via AP)
October 02, 2019 - 9:21 pm
A government-funded group that’s leading efforts to set standards for gene editing has pulled a video it posted in the wake of concern about how it portrayed the ethically dicey science and its possible use to make designer babies. The National Academy of Sciences posted the video earlier this week...
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This image made from the National Academy of Sciences website on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019 shows part of a video of people discussing gene editing and designer babies. The video gives the inaccurate impression that gene editing can give positive traits without any potential downsides _ “the definition of hubris,” said Harvard Medical School dean Dr. George Q. Daley, who also has been involved in academy work. “We are not there yet.” (National Academy of Sciences via AP)
October 02, 2019 - 8:53 pm
A government-funded group that’s leading efforts to set standards for gene editing has pulled a video it posted in the wake of concern about how it portrayed the ethically dicey science and its possible use to make designer babies. The National Academy of Sciences posted the video earlier this week...
Read More

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