Biology

Violinist Anthony Hyatt leads dancers through MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington on Oct. 11, 2017. Musicians and dancers are part of the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center's arts and humanities program. (AP Photo/Tom Sampson)
December 19, 2017 - 2:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Like a friendly Pied Piper, the violinist keeps up a toe-tapping beat as dancers weave through busy hospital hallways and into the chemotherapy unit, patients looking up in surprised delight. Upstairs, a cellist plays an Irish folk tune for a patient in intensive care. Music...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2017, file photo, Dr. Albert Maguire, right, checks the eyes of Misa Kaabali, 8, at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Misa was 4-years-old when he received his gene therapy treatment. The first-of-its kind genetic treatment for blindness will cost $850,000, less than the $1 million price tag that had been expected, but it's still among the most expensive genetic therapies in the world. Spark Therapeutics said it decided on the lower price tag for Luxturna, after hearing from health insurers about their ability to cover the injectable treatment. (AP Photo/Bill West, File)
December 19, 2017 - 1:24 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials on Tuesday approved the nation's first gene therapy for an inherited disease, a treatment that improves the sight of patients with a rare form of blindness. It marks another major advance for the emerging field of genetic medicine. The approval for Spark...
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In this undated photo released by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), an endangered Asian giant softshell turtle is seen near a nest of eggs on a sandbar in the Mekong river between Kratie and Stung Treng, northeastern Cambodia. Conservationists have found a nest of the endangered Asian turtle eggs in northeastern Cambodia, while 115 new species of various other animal and plant life were also discovered in the greater Mekong region. (Wildlife Conservation Society via AP)
December 19, 2017 - 1:33 am
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — Conservationists have found a nest of the endangered Asian giant softshell turtle on a Mekong River sandbar in northeastern Cambodia, while 115 new species of various other animal and plant life have been discovered in the greater Mekong region. The New York-based...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2008 file photo, a North Atlantic right whale breaks the ocean surface off Provincetown, Mass., in Cape Cod Bay. Officials with the federal government say it’s time to consider the possibility that endangered right whales could become extinct unless new steps are taken to protect them. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File)
December 10, 2017 - 9:00 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Officials with the federal government say it's time to consider the possibility that endangered right whales could become extinct unless new steps are taken to protect them. North Atlantic right whales are among the rarest marine mammals in the world, and they have endured a...
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December 10, 2017 - 8:20 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Officials with the federal government say it's time to consider the possibility that endangered right whales could become extinct unless new steps are taken to protect them. North Atlantic right whales are among the rarest marine mammals in the world, and they have endured a...
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December 10, 2017 - 8:16 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Science officials with the federal government say it's time to consider the possibility that endangered right whales could become extinct unless new steps are taken to protect them. North Atlantic right whales are among the rarest marine mammals in the world, and they have...
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This Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 photo provided by Jay Konduros, left, shows him and his brother, Bill, at Jay's home in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada. The brothers, who have hemophilia, were involved in a gene therapy study for their condition. Before the treatment, "Even something as innocuous as reaching over your head to get something out of a closet, or reaching down to tie a shoe" could trigger trouble, Bill said. (Courtesy Jay Konduros via AP)
December 06, 2017 - 10:39 pm
Gene therapy has freed 10 men from nearly all symptoms of hemophilia for a year so far, in a study that fuels hopes that a one-time treatment can give long-lasting help and perhaps even cure the blood disease. Hemophilia almost always strikes males and is caused by lack of a gene that makes a...
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This Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 photo provided by Jay Konduros, left, shows him and his brother, Bill, at Jay's home in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada. The brothers, who have hemophilia, were involved in a gene therapy study for their condition. Before the treatment, "Even something as innocuous as reaching over your head to get something out of a closet, or reaching down to tie a shoe" could trigger trouble, Bill said. (Courtesy Jay Konduros via AP)
December 06, 2017 - 5:05 pm
Gene therapy has freed 10 men from nearly all symptoms of hemophilia for a year so far, in a study that fuels hopes that a one-time treatment can give long-lasting help and perhaps even cure the blood disease. Hemophilia almost always strikes males and is caused by lack of a gene that makes a...
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This undated photo provided by The Scripps Research Institute shows a semi-synthetic strain of E. coli bacteria that can churn out novel proteins. Scientists reported on Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, that they have expanded the genetic code of life and used man-made DNA to create this strain of bacteria. (Bill Kiosses/The Scripps Research Institute via AP)
November 29, 2017 - 1:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are expanding the genetic code of life, using man-made DNA to create a semi-synthetic strain of bacteria — and new research shows those altered microbes actually worked to produce proteins unlike those found in nature. It's a step toward designer drug development. One...
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This undated photo provided by The Scripps Research Institute shows a semi-synthetic strain of E. coli bacteria that can churn out novel proteins. Scientists reported on Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, that they have expanded the genetic code of life and used man-made DNA to create this strain of bacteria. (Bill Kiosses/The Scripps Research Institute via AP)
November 29, 2017 - 1:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are expanding the genetic code of life, using artificial DNA to create semi-synthetic bacteria — and now they've found the altered bugs can produce proteins unlike those found in nature. It's a step toward designer drug development. All life is made up of four DNA...
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