Biology

In this July 23, 2019 photo, Jim Andrews, a University of Vermont herpetology lecturer, holds a young northern leopard frog in Salisbury, Vt. A wet spring has resulted in a 100-fold increase in the population of the particular frog in a region of Vermont. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)
July 25, 2019 - 1:16 pm
SALISBURY, Vt. (AP) — A wet spring has caused one frog population to explode in an area of Vermont where throngs of the amphibians have been hopping through fields and lawns, darting across roads and getting flattened by cars and tractors. University of Vermont herpetology lecturer James Andrews...
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FILE - This April 12, 2018 file photo shows the eye of a woman in New York. Patients are about to be enrolled in the first study to test gene editing inside the body to try to cure an inherited form of blindness. People with the disease have healthy eyes but lack a gene that converts light into signals to the brain that enable sight. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)
July 25, 2019 - 12:08 pm
Patients are about to be enrolled in the first study to test a gene-editing technique known as CRISPR inside the body to try to cure an inherited form of blindness. People with the disease have normal eyes but lack a gene that converts light into signals to the brain that enable sight. The...
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FILE - In this Sunday, May 27, 2012 file photo, people hold pictures of Emanuela Orlandi reading, "march for truth and justice for Emanuela" in St. Peter's square, at the Vatican. An expert for the family of a Vatican teenager who went missing in 1983 says there are thousands of bones in an underground space near a Vatican cemetery. Giorgio Portera, engaged by Emanuela Orlandi’s family, said the extent of the cache emerged Saturday when Vatican-appointed experts began cataloguing the remains discovered on July 13. Portera said skulls and bones appear to belong to dozens of individuals. The Vatican made no mention of the number but said analyses would resume on July 27. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, File)
July 20, 2019 - 2:38 pm
VATICAN CITY (AP) — A genetics expert retained by the family of a girl who went missing in 1983 said Saturday that a cavernous underground space near a Vatican cemetery holds thousands of bones that appear to be from dozens of individuals, both "adult and non-adult." The expert, Giorgio Portera,...
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FILE - In this Sunday, May 27, 2012 file photo, people hold pictures of Emanuela Orlandi reading, "march for truth and justice for Emanuela" in St. Peter's square, at the Vatican. An expert for the family of a Vatican teenager who went missing in 1983 says there are thousands of bones in an underground space near a Vatican cemetery. Giorgio Portera, engaged by Emanuela Orlandi’s family, said the extent of the cache emerged Saturday when Vatican-appointed experts began cataloguing the remains discovered on July 13. Portera said skulls and bones appear to belong to dozens of individuals. The Vatican made no mention of the number but said analyses would resume on July 27. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, File)
July 20, 2019 - 12:29 pm
VATICAN CITY (AP) — A genetics expert retained by the family of an Italian girl who went missing in 1983 said Saturday that a cavernous underground space near a Vatican cemetery holds thousands of bones that appear to be from dozens of individuals, both "adult and non-adult." The expert, Giorgio...
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FILE - In this Sunday, July 14, 2019, file photo, the sun sets behind telescopes at the summit of Mauna Kea. Scientists are expected to explore fundamental questions about our universe when they use a giant new telescope planned for the summit of Hawaii’s tallest mountain. That includes whether there’s life outside our solar system and how stars and galaxies formed in the earliest years of the universe. But some Native Hawaiians don’t want the Thirty Meter Telescope to be built at Mauna Kea’s summit, saying it will further harm a place they consider sacred. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
July 19, 2019 - 10:06 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Is there life on planets outside our solar system? How did stars and galaxies form in the earliest years of the universe? How do black holes shape galaxies? Scientists are expected to explore those and other fundamental questions about the universe when they peer deep into the night...
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FILE - This undated image provided by National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center shows a 5.5-inch long rare pocket shark. A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species, and one that squirts little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named it the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama (mah-lihs-KWAH-muh) mississippiensis (MISS-ih-SIP-ee-EHN-sis). (Mark Grace/National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 5:41 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species. And the mysterious pouches that it's named for, up near its front fins? Scientists say they squirt little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York...
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FILE - This undated image provided by National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center shows a 5.5-inch long rare pocket shark. A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species, and one that squirts little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named it the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama (mah-lihs-KWAH-muh) mississippiensis (MISS-ih-SIP-ee-EHN-sis). (Mark Grace/National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 4:38 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species. And the mysterious pouches that it's named for, up near its front fins? Scientists say they squirt little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York...
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FILE - This undated image provided by National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center shows a 5.5-inch long rare pocket shark. A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species, and one that squirts little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named it the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama (mah-lihs-KWAH-muh) mississippiensis (MISS-ih-SIP-ee-EHN-sis). (Mark Grace/National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 4:35 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico turns out to be a new species. And the mysterious pouches that it's named for? Scientists say they squirt little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named the species the...
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FILE - In this Sunday, July 14, 2019, file photo, the sun sets behind telescopes at the summit of Mauna Kea. Scientists are expected to explore fundamental questions about our universe when they use a giant new telescope planned for the summit of Hawaii’s tallest mountain. That includes whether there’s life outside our solar system and how stars and galaxies formed in the earliest years of the universe. But some Native Hawaiians don’t want the Thirty Meter Telescope to be built at Mauna Kea’s summit, saying it will further harm a place they consider sacred. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
July 19, 2019 - 10:35 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Is there life on planets outside our solar system? How did stars and galaxies form in the earliest years of the universe? How do black holes shape galaxies? Scientists are expected to explore those and other fundamental questions about the universe when they peer deep into the night...
Read More
Georgia Department of Natural Resources personnel and beachgoers struggle to keep a short-fin pilot whale from crashing into the seawall on St. Simons Island, Ga., Tuesday, July16, 2019. Dozens of pilot whales beached themselves on a Georgia shore and most were rescued by authorities and onlookers who pulled the animals further into the water. (Bobby Haven /The Brunswick News via AP)
July 17, 2019 - 3:23 pm
ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. (AP) — The Latest on efforts to keep a group of pilot whales from beaching themselves in Georgia (all times local): 3:20 p.m. A state biologist in Georgia says dozens of pilot whales appear to be heading back to sea a day after many of them came perilously close to swimming...
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