Biology

FILE - In this Sunday, July 14, 2019, file photo, the sun sets behind telescopes at the summit of Mauna Kea. Scientists are expected to explore fundamental questions about our universe when they use a giant new telescope planned for the summit of Hawaii’s tallest mountain. That includes whether there’s life outside our solar system and how stars and galaxies formed in the earliest years of the universe. But some Native Hawaiians don’t want the Thirty Meter Telescope to be built at Mauna Kea’s summit, saying it will further harm a place they consider sacred. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
July 19, 2019 - 10:06 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Is there life on planets outside our solar system? How did stars and galaxies form in the earliest years of the universe? How do black holes shape galaxies? Scientists are expected to explore those and other fundamental questions about the universe when they peer deep into the night...
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FILE - This undated image provided by National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center shows a 5.5-inch long rare pocket shark. A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species, and one that squirts little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named it the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama (mah-lihs-KWAH-muh) mississippiensis (MISS-ih-SIP-ee-EHN-sis). (Mark Grace/National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 5:41 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species. And the mysterious pouches that it's named for, up near its front fins? Scientists say they squirt little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York...
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FILE - This undated image provided by National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center shows a 5.5-inch long rare pocket shark. A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species, and one that squirts little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named it the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama (mah-lihs-KWAH-muh) mississippiensis (MISS-ih-SIP-ee-EHN-sis). (Mark Grace/National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 4:38 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species. And the mysterious pouches that it's named for, up near its front fins? Scientists say they squirt little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York...
Read More
FILE - This undated image provided by National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center shows a 5.5-inch long rare pocket shark. A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species, and one that squirts little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named it the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama (mah-lihs-KWAH-muh) mississippiensis (MISS-ih-SIP-ee-EHN-sis). (Mark Grace/National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 4:35 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico turns out to be a new species. And the mysterious pouches that it's named for? Scientists say they squirt little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named the species the...
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FILE - In this Sunday, July 14, 2019, file photo, the sun sets behind telescopes at the summit of Mauna Kea. Scientists are expected to explore fundamental questions about our universe when they use a giant new telescope planned for the summit of Hawaii’s tallest mountain. That includes whether there’s life outside our solar system and how stars and galaxies formed in the earliest years of the universe. But some Native Hawaiians don’t want the Thirty Meter Telescope to be built at Mauna Kea’s summit, saying it will further harm a place they consider sacred. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
July 19, 2019 - 10:35 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Is there life on planets outside our solar system? How did stars and galaxies form in the earliest years of the universe? How do black holes shape galaxies? Scientists are expected to explore those and other fundamental questions about the universe when they peer deep into the night...
Read More
Georgia Department of Natural Resources personnel and beachgoers struggle to keep a short-fin pilot whale from crashing into the seawall on St. Simons Island, Ga., Tuesday, July16, 2019. Dozens of pilot whales beached themselves on a Georgia shore and most were rescued by authorities and onlookers who pulled the animals further into the water. (Bobby Haven /The Brunswick News via AP)
July 17, 2019 - 3:23 pm
ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. (AP) — The Latest on efforts to keep a group of pilot whales from beaching themselves in Georgia (all times local): 3:20 p.m. A state biologist in Georgia says dozens of pilot whales appear to be heading back to sea a day after many of them came perilously close to swimming...
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This microscope image shows the 46 human chromosomes, blue, with telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. Research released on Tuesday, July 16, 2019 offers some of the first biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease, and how this most common form of dementia varies by gender. (Hesed Padilla-Nash, Thomas Ried/National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health via AP)
July 16, 2019 - 3:10 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — New research gives some biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease and how this most common form of dementia varies by sex. At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Los Angeles on Tuesday, scientists offered evidence...
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This microscope image shows the 46 human chromosomes, blue, with telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. Research released on Tuesday, July 16, 2019 offers some of the first biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease, and how this most common form of dementia varies by gender. (Hesed Padilla-Nash, Thomas Ried/National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health via AP)
July 16, 2019 - 2:45 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — New research gives some biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease and how this most common form of dementia varies by sex. At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Los Angeles on Tuesday, scientists offered evidence...
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In this undated photo provided by her family, showing Suzanne Eaton, a 59-year-old molecular biologist. A state coroner on Wednesday, July 10, 2019, on the Greek island of Crete says that the body of a woman believed to be the missing American scientist had died as a result of a "criminal act" although her identity still has to be confirmed, after Eaton was reported missing last week. (AP Photo)
July 16, 2019 - 11:07 am
ATHENS, Greece (AP) — A 27-year-old man was charged with murder and rape Tuesday in the killing of an American scientist who disappeared on the Greek island of Crete and whose body was found in a tunnel formerly used as a storage site during World War II. Crete police said a Greek man from the...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 1:28 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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