Biology

This 2005 photo provided by Bethany Bradley shows cheatgrass, at right, invading shrubs, left, near Lovelock, Nev. A new study finds that for much of the United States, invasive grass species, such as cheatgrass, are making wildfires more frequent, especially in fire-prone California. (Bethany Bradley/University of Massachusetts via AP)
November 04, 2019 - 3:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study finds that for much of the United States, invasive grass species are making wildfires more frequent, especially in fire-prone California. Study co-author Bethany Bradley of the University of Massachusetts says in a way a dozen non-native grass species act like little...
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FILE- In this March 27, 2019, file photo, vials of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine sit in a cooler at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y. Research released on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, shows yet another reason to vaccinate children against measles. After a bout of measles, youngsters are more vulnerable to other germs _ from chickenpox to strep _ that they once could fend off. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
October 31, 2019 - 2:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Measles has a stealth side effect: New research shows it erases much of the immune system's memory of how to fight other germs, so children recover only to be left more vulnerable to bugs like flu or strep. Scientists dubbed the startling findings "immune amnesia." The body can...
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Mark Schipp, the President of World Organization for Animal Health briefs media in Sydney, Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, on the threat of African swine fever. Schipp says that the spread of the disease in the past year to countries including China, which has half the world's pig population, had inflamed a worldwide crisis. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)
October 31, 2019 - 3:49 am
SYDNEY (AP) — Around a quarter of the world's pigs are expected to die from African swine fever as authorities grapple with a complex disease spreading rapidly in the globalization era, the World Organization for Animal Health's president said Thursday. A sharp reduction in the world's pig...
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FILE - This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions. Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious and rare illness, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. University of California, San Francisco, researchers tested how the immune system fought back and found clear signs that an enterovirus, a common seasonal virus that specialists have suspected, was indeed the culprit. The the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that AFM spikes coincided with seasons when certain strains of enteroviruses - EV-D68 and EV-A71 - were causing widespread respiratory illnesses. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Yiting Zhang/CDC via AP, File)
October 21, 2019 - 11:35 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious illness that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. The poliolike syndrome, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, is very rare. Since the first reports from California in...
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FILE - This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions. Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious and rare illness, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. University of California, San Francisco, researchers tested how the immune system fought back and found clear signs that an enterovirus, a common seasonal virus that specialists have suspected, was indeed the culprit. The the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that AFM spikes coincided with seasons when certain strains of enteroviruses - EV-D68 and EV-A71 - were causing widespread respiratory illnesses. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Yiting Zhang/CDC via AP, File)
October 21, 2019 - 11:25 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious illness that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. The paralysis is very rare. U.S. health officials have confirmed 590 cases over the past five years. Finding the cause...
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File-Picture taken in August 2017 show linear clusters of trilobites (arthropods) on the surface of the rock slab. These fossils come the Fezouata Shale in Morocco (near Zagora). Their age is 480 million years. The trilobites are all oriented towards the same direction. The head part has a long spine in the front. There are also two lateral spines along the animal's body. (AP Photo/Jean Vannier)
October 17, 2019 - 11:55 am
BERLIN (AP) — Ever felt like you've been queuing forever? Scientists say fossils found in Morocco suggest the practice of forming orderly lines may date back 480 million years and could have had evolutionary advantages. Their study, published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports, describes...
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FILE - In this Monday, Dec. 10, 2018 file photo, a bust of the Nobel Prize founder, Alfred Nobel on display at the Concert Hall during the Nobel Prize award ceremony in Stockholm. Controversy stalks the Nobel prizes for peace and literature in a way it rarely does for science. The revamped panel at the Swedish Academy who will hand out the Nobel literature prizes Thursday Oct. 10, 2019, for both 2018 and 2019 would relish arguments about the winners, rather than intrigue about the #MeToo scandal that forced the institution to suspend the prize last year. (Henrik Montgomery/Pool Photo via AP, File)
October 10, 2019 - 2:25 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Two Nobel Prizes in literature will be announced Thursday after the 2018 literature award was postponed following sex abuse allegations that rocked the Swedish Academy. The chemistry prize went Wednesday to three scientists for their work leading to the development of lithium-ion...
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FILE - In this Monday, Dec. 10, 2018 file photo, a bust of the Nobel Prize founder, Alfred Nobel on display at the Concert Hall during the Nobel Prize award ceremony in Stockholm. Controversy stalks the Nobel prizes for peace and literature in a way it rarely does for science. The revamped panel at the Swedish Academy who will hand out the Nobel literature prizes Thursday Oct. 10, 2019, for both 2018 and 2019 would relish arguments about the winners, rather than intrigue about the #MeToo scandal that forced the institution to suspend the prize last year. (Henrik Montgomery/Pool Photo via AP, File)
October 09, 2019 - 3:19 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will be announced Wednesday, a day after the Physics award was given to a Canadian-American cosmologist and two Swiss scientists. On Monday, the award for Physiology or Medicine went to two Americans and one British scientist. And on Thursday come...
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FILE - In this Monday, Dec. 10, 2018 file photo, a bust of the Nobel Prize founder, Alfred Nobel on display at the Concert Hall during the Nobel Prize award ceremony in Stockholm. Controversy stalks the Nobel prizes for peace and literature in a way it rarely does for science. The revamped panel at the Swedish Academy who will hand out the Nobel literature prizes Thursday Oct. 10, 2019, for both 2018 and 2019 would relish arguments about the winners, rather than intrigue about the #MeToo scandal that forced the institution to suspend the prize last year. (Henrik Montgomery/Pool Photo via AP, File)
October 09, 2019 - 3:02 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will be announced Wednesday, a day after the Physics award was given to a Canadian-American cosmologist and two Swiss scientists. On Monday, the award for Physiology or Medicine went to two Americans and one British scientist. And on Thursday come...
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Professor Gregg Semenza, accompanied by Johns Hopkins University President Ron Daniels, waves to the crowd during a news conference after he was awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medicine Hospital in Baltimore, Md., Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. The 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine has been jointly awarded to William Kaelin Jr., Sir Peter Ratcliffe and Gregg Semenza for their pioneering research into how human cells respond to changing oxygen levels. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
October 07, 2019 - 8:35 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Two Americans and a British scientist won a Nobel Prize on Monday for discovering details of how the body's cells sense and react to low oxygen levels, providing a foothold for developing new treatments for anemia, cancer and other diseases. Drs. William G. Kaelin Jr. of Harvard...
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