Biodiversity

FILE - This Sept. 5, 2006, file photo, provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows a bearded seal in Kotzebue, Alaska. A federal agency will decide by September how much ocean and coast will be designated as critical habitat for two ice seal species found in Alaska. The Center for Biological Diversity announced Monday, Nov. 25, 2019, it had reached an agreement with the Commerce Department for the Trump administration to issue a critical habitat rule for ringed and bearded seals. The Center for Biological Diversity sued in June because no critical habitat had been designated. (Michael Cameron/NOAA Fisheries Service via AP, file)
November 25, 2019 - 8:15 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A federal agency will decide by September how much ocean and coast in northern Alaska will be designated as critical habitat for two ice seal species. The Center for Biological Diversity announced Monday it had reached an agreement with the Commerce Department for the Trump...
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FILE - This Sept. 5, 2006, file photo, provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows a bearded seal in Kotzebue, Alaska. A federal agency will decide by September how much ocean and coast will be designated as critical habitat for two ice seal species found in Alaska. The Center for Biological Diversity announced Monday, Nov. 25, 2019, it had reached an agreement with the Commerce Department for the Trump administration to issue a critical habitat rule for ringed and bearded seals. The Center for Biological Diversity sued in June because no critical habitat had been designated. (Michael Cameron/NOAA Fisheries Service via AP, file)
November 25, 2019 - 8:00 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A federal agency will decide by September how much ocean and coast in northern Alaska will be designated as critical habitat for two ice seal species. The Center for Biological Diversity announced Monday it had reached an agreement with the Commerce Department for the Trump...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a side view of a recently emerged adult female western glacier stonefly from below Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park, Mont. The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the northern Rocky Mountains will be protected as threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. (Joe Giersch/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)
November 20, 2019 - 7:09 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a side view of a recently emerged adult female western glacier stonefly from below Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park, Mont. The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the northern Rocky Mountains will be protected as threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. (Joe Giersch/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)
November 20, 2019 - 6:41 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the...
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In this Jun. 21, 2018, photo, a silver-backed chevrotain is captured by camera trap in an undisclosed forest in south central Vietnam. The species, commonly known as Vietnamese mouse deer, was rediscovered after 30 years. (Southern Institute of Ecology/Global Wildlife Conservation/Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research/NCNP via AP)
November 12, 2019 - 5:04 am
HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — A tiny deer-like species not seen by scientists for nearly 30 years has been photographed in a forest in southern Vietnam, a conservation group said Tuesday. Images of the silver-backed chevrotain, commonly called the Vietnamese mouse deer, were captured in the wild by trap...
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File - In this Oct. 26, 2019, file photo, riders herd bison during the annual bison roundup on Antelope Island in Utah. Evidence is mounting that wild North American bison are gradually shedding their genetic diversity across many of the isolated herds overseen by the U.S. government, weakening future resilience against disease and climate events in the shadow of human encroachment. Advances in genetics are bringing the concern in to sharper focus. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
November 03, 2019 - 11:35 am
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Evidence is mounting that wild North American bison are gradually shedding their genetic diversity across many of the isolated herds overseen by the U.S. government, weakening future resilience against disease and climate events in the shadow of human encroachment. Advances in...
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In this 2007 photo provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, an interior least tern hatchling sits with other eggs in a nest on an island in the Lower Mississippi River. Once hurt the by the damning of major rivers like the Missouri and before that diminished by hunting for feathers for hats, the interior tern population has increased tenfold in population since 1985 to more than 18,000. On Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose taking the interior population of the least tern off the endangered list. (USACE, Memphis District via AP)
October 23, 2019 - 10:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — After 34 years on the endangered species list, a tiny Midwestern bird is ready to fly free of federal protection. Once diminished by hunting for feathers for hats and hurt by the damming of major rivers like the Missouri, the interior least tern population has increased tenfold...
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In this 2007 photo provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, an interior least tern hatchling sits with other eggs in a nest on an island in the Lower Mississippi River. Once hurt the by the damning of major rivers like the Missouri and before that diminished by hunting for feathers for hats, the interior tern population has increased tenfold in population since 1985 to more than 18,000. On Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose taking the interior population of the least tern off the endangered list. (USACE, Memphis District via AP)
October 23, 2019 - 5:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — After 34 years on the endangered species list, a tiny Midwestern bird is ready to fly free of federal protection. Once hurt the by the damming of major rivers like the Missouri and before that diminished by hunting for feathers for hats, the interior least tern population has...
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FILE - In this May 1, 2015 file photo, a dunes sagebrush lizard is shown. The dunes sagebrush lizard is found among the dunes straddling New Mexico and West Texas in one of the nation's richest oil basins and is at the center of a new lawsuit. Environmentalists want the federal government to add the lizard to the endangered species list. The fight stretches back to the Bush and Obama administrations and could affect part of the multibillion-dollar energy industry in the Permian Basin. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)
October 01, 2019 - 4:08 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A small lizard found among the dunes straddling New Mexico and West Texas in one of the nation's richest oil basins is at the center of a legal complaint filed Tuesday. Environmentalists want the U.S. government to add the lizard to the endangered species list as part of a...
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September 27, 2019 - 6:32 am
GENEVA (AP) — An international conservation group is warning that more than half of the trees in Europe that exist nowhere else in the world are threatened with extinction. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature says in their latest assessment of Europe's biodiversity that 58% of...
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