Biochemistry

In this 2011 photo provided by Bence Viola of the University of Toronto, researchers excavate a cave for Denisovan fossils in the Altai Krai area of Russia. On Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, scientists reported in the journal Nature that they have found the remains of an ancient female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. (Bence Viola/Department of Anthropology - University of Toronto/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology via AP)
August 22, 2018 - 1:05 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they've found the remains of a prehistoric female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. The 90,000-year-old bone fragment found in southern Siberia marks the first time a direct...
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In this 2011 photo provided by Bence Viola of the University of Toronto, researchers excavate a cave for Denisovan fossils in the Altai Krai area of Russia. On Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, scientists reported in the journal Nature that they have found the remains of an ancient female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. (Bence Viola/Department of Anthropology - University of Toronto/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology via AP)
August 22, 2018 - 1:03 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they've found the remains of an ancient female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. Researchers reported Wednesday in Nature that DNA from a bone fragment found in a Siberian cave...
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May 01, 2018 - 9:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Wanted: A million people willing to share their DNA and 10 years of health habits, big and small, for science. On Sunday, the U.S. government will open nationwide enrollment for an ambitious experiment: If they can build a large enough database comparing the genetics, lifestyles...
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CORRECTS LOCATION TO WHITEHOUSE, NOT SWANTON - This March 2017 photo provided by Heidi Bisbee shows Carly Kudzia, 7, with her mother, Heather Unsinger, in Whitehouse, Ohio. Carly participated in a study suggesting that the drug lonafarnib may extend life for children with progeria, a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging. Other kids "always think I'm a baby," Carly says. But "I'm a regular kid." (Heidi Bisbee via AP)
April 24, 2018 - 3:47 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Children with a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging and early death may live longer if treated with an experimental drug first developed for cancer patients, a study suggests. The small, preliminary study isn't proof the drug works and it found only a small benefit:...
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CORRECTS LOCATION TO WHITEHOUSE, NOT SWANTON - This March 2017 photo provided by Heidi Bisbee shows Carly Kudzia, 7, with her mother, Heather Unsinger, in Whitehouse, Ohio. Carly participated in a study suggesting that the drug lonafarnib may extend life for children with progeria, a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging. Other kids "always think I'm a baby," Carly says. But "I'm a regular kid." (Heidi Bisbee via AP)
April 24, 2018 - 11:17 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Children with a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging and early death may live longer if treated with an experimental drug first developed for cancer patients, a study suggests. The small, preliminary study isn't proof the drug works and it found only a small benefit:...
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In this Aug. 14, 2017 photo, Marie Kesten Zahn, an archaeologist and education coordinator at the Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth, Mass., probes the concretion surrounding a leg bone that was salvaged from the Whydah shipwreck off the coast of Wellfleet on Cape Cod. Researchers are working to determine if the remains belong to Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy, the captain of the ship. (Merrily Cassidy/Cape Cod Times via AP)
February 19, 2018 - 7:56 pm
YARMOUTH, Mass. (AP) — Researchers are working to use DNA to identify whether a human bone recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck belongs to the infamous pirate Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy. The Whydah (WIH'-duh) Pirate Museum in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, publicly displayed the bone Monday. It was found...
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In this Aug. 14, 2017 photo, Marie Kesten Zahn, an archaeologist and education coordinator at the Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth, Mass., probes the concretion surrounding a leg bone that was salvaged from the Whydah shipwreck off the coast of Wellfleet on Cape Cod. Researchers are working to determine if the remains belong to Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy, the captain of the ship. (Merrily Cassidy/Cape Cod Times via AP)
February 19, 2018 - 5:02 pm
YARMOUTH, Mass. (AP) — Researchers say they're working to use DNA to identify whether a human bone recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck belongs to the infamous pirate Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy. The Whydah (WIH'-duh) Pirate Museum in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, publicly displayed the bone Monday. The...
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