Aviation safety and security

FILE - This Thursday, March 14, 2019, file photo shows a Boeing 737 Max 8 airplane parked at Boeing Field in Seattle. America's standing as the model for aviation-safety regulation will be on trial as congressional hearings begin Wednesday, March 27, 2019, into the Federal Aviation Administration's oversight of Boeing before and after two deadly crashes of its best-selling airliner. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
March 27, 2019 - 6:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Congressional hearings looking into the Federal Aviation Administration's oversight of Boeing (all times local): ___ 5:50 p.m. Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., challenged FAA Acting Administrator Daniel Elwell on whether the FAA should ban "selling safety features a la...
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In this photo taken with a fish-eye lens, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits on the assembly line during a brief media tour in Boeing's 737 assembly facility, Wednesday, March 27, 2019, in Renton, Wash. The Federal Aviation Administration plans to revamp oversight of airplane development after the two deadly crashes of Boeing's new 737 Max 8 airplane, according to testimony prepared for a Capitol Hill hearing on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
March 27, 2019 - 5:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Aviation Administration plans to revamp oversight of airplane development after the two deadly crashes of Boeing's new 737 Max raised questions of whether the FAA has gone too far in letting companies regulate themselves, a Transportation Department official said...
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In this Monday, March 11, 2019 file photo, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group sits parked in the background at right at Boeing Co.'s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Wash. The Transportation Department confirmed that its watchdog agency will examine how the FAA certified the Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, the now-grounded plane involved in two fatal accidents within five months. The FAA had stood by the safety of the plane up until last Wednesday, March 13, 2019 despite other countries grounding it. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
March 21, 2019 - 3:07 am
Boeing's grounded airliners are likely to be parked longer now that European and Canadian regulators plan to conduct their own reviews of changes the company is making after two of the jets crashed. The Europeans and Canadians want to do more than simply take the U.S. Federal Aviation...
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In this Monday, March 11, 2019 file photo, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group sits parked in the background at right at Boeing Co.'s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Wash. The Transportation Department confirmed that its watchdog agency will examine how the FAA certified the Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, the now-grounded plane involved in two fatal accidents within five months. The FAA had stood by the safety of the plane up until last Wednesday, March 13, 2019 despite other countries grounding it. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
March 20, 2019 - 9:59 pm
Boeing's grounded airliners are likely to be parked longer now that European and Canadian regulators plan to conduct their own reviews of changes the company is making after two of the jets crashed. The Europeans and Canadians want to do more than simply take the U.S. Federal Aviation...
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Rescue workers install a screen on the spot where a body was covered with a white blanket following a shooting in Utrecht, Netherlands, Monday, March 18, 2019. Police in the central Dutch city of Utrecht say on Twitter that "multiple" people have been injured as a result of a shooting in a tram in a residential neighborhood. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
March 18, 2019 - 1:05 pm
UTRECHT, Netherlands (AP) — A gunman killed three people and wounded five on a tram in the Dutch city of Utrecht on Monday morning in what the mayor said appeared to be a terror attack, touching off a manhunt that saw heavily armed officers with dogs zero in on an apartment building nearby...
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Rescue workers install a screen on the spot where a body was covered with a white blanket following a shooting in Utrecht, Netherlands, Monday, March 18, 2019. Police in the central Dutch city of Utrecht say on Twitter that "multiple" people have been injured as a result of a shooting in a tram in a residential neighborhood. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
March 18, 2019 - 12:55 pm
UTRECHT, Netherlands (AP) — A gunman killed three people and wounded five on a streetcar in the Dutch city of Utrecht on Monday morning in what the mayor said appeared to be a terror attack, touching off a manhunt that saw heavily armed officers with dogs zero in on an apartment building nearby...
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FILE - In this Feb. 5, 2019, file photo, Southwest Airlines planes are loaded at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Seattle. Southwest Airlines and a union representing its mechanics say they're on the verge of ending a bitter, long-running labor dispute that has triggered hundreds of flight cancellations and raised safety concerns. The two sides say the breakthrough announced Saturday, March 16, 2019, consists of a preliminary agreement on a new contract after six years of negotiation between Southwest and the Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
March 17, 2019 - 3:52 pm
DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines and a union representing its mechanics could be on the verge of ending a bitter, long-running labor dispute that has triggered hundreds of flight cancellations and raised safety concerns. The two sides announced the tentative contract agreement late Saturday after...
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FILE - This Friday, June 19, 2015 file photo shows the Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration building, in Washington. For more than six decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has relied on employees of airplane manufacturers to do government-required safety inspections as planes are being designed or assembled. But critics say the system, dubbed the "Designee Program," is too cozy as company employees do work for an agency charged with keeping the skies safe while being paid by an industry that the FAA is regulating. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
March 15, 2019 - 3:24 pm
For more than six decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has relied on employees of airplane manufacturers to do government-required safety inspections as planes are being designed or assembled. But critics say the system, dubbed the "designee program," is too cozy as company employees do...
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FILE - This Friday, June 19, 2015 file photo shows the Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration building, in Washington. For more than six decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has relied on employees of airplane manufacturers to do government-required safety inspections as planes are being designed or assembled. But critics say the system, dubbed the "Designee Program," is too cozy as company employees do work for an agency charged with keeping the skies safe while being paid by an industry that the FAA is regulating. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
March 15, 2019 - 6:58 am
For more than six decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has relied on employees of airplane manufacturers to do government-required safety inspections as planes are being designed or assembled. But critics say the system, dubbed the "designee program," is too cozy as company employees do...
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A worker walks next to a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane parked at Boeing Field, Thursday, March 14, 2019, in Seattle. The fatal crash Sunday of a 737 MAX 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines was the second fatal flight for a Boeing 737 Max 8 in less than six months, and more than 40 countries, including the U.S., have now grounded the planes or refused to let them into their airspace. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
March 14, 2019 - 8:35 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — In an era of unprecedented airline safety, Boeing's newest version of its best-selling airliner has crashed twice in less than six months, killing 346 people and delivering a massive blow to the company's reputation. More than 40 countries either grounded the planes or refused to...
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