Atmospheric science

A man holds up a phone during a video call to show a a flooded alley outside a shop, in Venice, Italy, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Exceptionally high tidal waters returned to Venice on Friday, prompting the mayor to close the iconic St. Mark's Square and call for donations to repair the Italian lagoon city just three days after it experienced its worst flooding in 50 years. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
November 15, 2019 - 4:46 pm
VENICE, Italy (AP) — The historic lagoon city of Venice exists on the edge of a double threat: As it sinks, the seas rise. That reality became more stark this week when Venice was hit with its worst flood in over 50 years, caused by a nearly 1.9 meter (6-foot) tide that sent waist-high water...
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A man holds up a phone during a video call to show a a flooded alley outside a shop, in Venice, Italy, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Exceptionally high tidal waters returned to Venice on Friday, prompting the mayor to close the iconic St. Mark's Square and call for donations to repair the Italian lagoon city just three days after it experienced its worst flooding in 50 years. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
November 15, 2019 - 3:04 pm
VENICE, Italy (AP) — The historic lagoon city of Venice exists on the edge of a double threat: As it sinks, the seas rise. That reality became more stark this week when Venice was hit with its worst flood in over 50 years, caused by a nearly 1.9 meter (6-foot) tide that sent waist-high water...
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A man holds up a phone during a video call to show a a flooded alley outside a shop, in Venice, Italy, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Exceptionally high tidal waters returned to Venice on Friday, prompting the mayor to close the iconic St. Mark's Square and call for donations to repair the Italian lagoon city just three days after it experienced its worst flooding in 50 years. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
November 15, 2019 - 2:15 pm
VENICE, Italy (AP) — The historic lagoon city of Venice exists on the edge of a double threat: As it sinks, the seas rise. That reality became more stark this week when Venice was hit with its worst flood in over 50 years, caused by a nearly 1.9 meter (6-foot) tide that sent waist-high water...
Read More
A man holds up a phone during a video call to show a a flooded alley outside a shop, in Venice, Italy, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Exceptionally high tidal waters returned to Venice on Friday, prompting the mayor to close the iconic St. Mark's Square and call for donations to repair the Italian lagoon city just three days after it experienced its worst flooding in 50 years. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
November 15, 2019 - 1:37 pm
MILAN (AP) — The historic lagoon city of Venice exists on the edge of a double threat: As it sinks, the seas rise. That reality became more stark this week when Venice was hit with its worst flood in over 50 years, caused by a nearly 1.9 meter (6-foot) tide that sent waist-high water flowing...
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In this Aug. 20, 2019 file photo, a relative embraces a young patient receiving treatment for dengue at the University School Hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. In an international report released on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, doctors say children are growing up in a warmer world that will hit them with more and different health problems than their parents had. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
November 13, 2019 - 6:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new international report by doctors says children are growing up in a warmer world that will hit them with more and different health problems than their parents experienced. Wednesday’s report says global warming is already worsening conditions that spread diarrhea diseases,...
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FILE - In a Aug. 30, 2005 file photo, floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina fill the streets near downtown New Orleans. The most destructive U.S. hurricanes are hitting three times more frequently than they did a century ago, a new study by a Danish research team said Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
November 11, 2019 - 3:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Big, destructive hurricanes are hitting the U.S. three times more frequently than they did a century ago, according to a new study. Experts generally measure a hurricane's destruction by adding up how much damage it did to people and cities. That can overlook storms that are...
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Climate activist Greta Thunberg speaks after a climate change march in Los Angeles, on Friday, Nov. 1, 2019. Thunberg says young people are rallying to fight climate change because their age leaves them with the most to lose from damage to the planet. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
November 02, 2019 - 9:41 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Greta Thunberg, Sweden's 16-year-old climate-change activist, joined fellow teenagers from throughout California Friday in telling a cheering crowd of hundreds at a Los Angeles rally that they can and will fight to save their planet from global warming. Thunberg, who has been...
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Climate activist Greta Thunberg speaks after a climate change march in Los Angeles, on Friday, Nov. 1, 2019. Thunberg says young people are rallying to fight climate change because their age leaves them with the most to lose from damage to the planet. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
November 01, 2019 - 8:19 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Greta Thunberg, Sweden's 16-year-old climate-change activist, joined fellow teenagers from throughout California Friday in telling a cheering crowd of hundreds at a Los Angeles rally that they can and will fight to save their planet from global warming. Thunberg, who has been...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2013, file photo, workers build a water barrier with sandbags as floodwater threaten their factory at Amata Nakorn industrial estate in Chonburi province, eastern Thailand. The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong, File)
October 29, 2019 - 12:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space...
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FILE - In this Sept. 4, 2019, file photo, people hold hands and navigate their way through a flooded street as it rains in Mumbai, India. The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday, Oct. 29. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade, File)
October 29, 2019 - 12:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study says the number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought. But it's not because of more water. The study says it is because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower...
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