Asteroids

This image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows an explosive dropped from Hayabusa2 spacecraft to make a crater on the asteroid Ryugu Friday, April 5, 2019. Japan's space agency JAXA said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully dropped the "small carry-on impactor" made of copper onto the asteroid and collect its underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. (JAXA via AP)
April 05, 2019 - 8:57 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's space agency said an explosive dropped Friday from its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully blasted the surface of an asteroid for the first time to form a crater and pave the way for the collection of underground samples for possible clues to the origin of the solar system...
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This image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows an explosive dropped from Hayabusa2 spacecraft to make a crater on the asteroid Ryugu Friday, April 5, 2019. Japan's space agency JAXA said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully dropped the "small carry-on impactor" made of copper onto the asteroid and collect its underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. (JAXA via AP)
April 05, 2019 - 6:00 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's space agency said an explosive dropped Friday from its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully blasted the surface of an asteroid for the first time to form a crater and pave the way for the collection of underground samples for possible clues to the origin of the solar system...
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This image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows an explosive dropped from Hayabusa2 spacecraft to make a crater on the asteroid Ryugu Friday, April 5, 2019. Japan's space agency JAXA said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully dropped the "small carry-on impactor" made of copper onto the asteroid and collect its underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. (JAXA via AP)
April 05, 2019 - 3:35 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's space agency said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully dropped an explosive designed to make a crater on an asteroid and collect its underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. Friday's crater mission is the riskiest for Hayabusa2, as it had...
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In this computer graphics image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Hayabusa2 spacecraft is seen above on the asteroid Ryugu. Japan's space agency JAXA said Friday, April 5, 2019, its Hayabusa2 spacecraft released an explosive onto an asteroid to make a crater on its surface and collect underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. The mission is the riskiest for Hayabusa2, as it has to immediately get away so it won't get hit by flying shards from the blast. (ISAS/JAXA via AP)
April 05, 2019 - 3:23 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's space agency said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully dropped an explosive designed to make a crater on an asteroid and collect its underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. Friday's crater mission is the riskiest for Hayabusa2, as it had...
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This image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows the asteroid Ryugu Friday, April 5, 2019. Japan's space agency JAXA said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft released an explosive onto the asteroid to make a crater on its surface and collect underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. Friday's mission is the riskiest for Hayabusa2, as it has to immediately get away so it won't get hit by flying shards from the blast. (JAXA via AP)
April 05, 2019 - 12:33 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's space agency said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft released an explosive onto an asteroid to make a crater on its surface and collect underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. Friday's crater mission is the riskiest for Hayabusa2, as it had to...
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April 04, 2019 - 11:51 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's space agency says its Hayabusa2 spacecraft has released an explosive onto an asteroid to make a crater on its surface and collect underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. Friday's mission is the riskiest for Hayabusa2, as it has to...
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FILE - This Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017 file photo shows a model of a Tyrannosaurus rex on display in the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuquerque, N.M. New research released on Friday, March 29, 2019 captures a fossilized snapshot of the day nearly 66 million years ago when an asteroid hit the Earth, fire rained from the sky and the ground shook far worse than any modern earthquake. It was the day that nearly all life on Earth went extinct, including the dinosaurs. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)
March 29, 2019 - 7:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — New research released Friday captures a fossilized snapshot of the day nearly 66 million years ago when an asteroid smacked Earth, fire rained from the sky and the ground shook far worse than any modern earthquake. It was the day that nearly all life on Earth went extinct,...
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March 29, 2019 - 4:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — New research captures a fossilized snapshot of the day nearly 66 million years ago when an asteroid smacked Earth, fire rained from the sky and the ground shook far worse than any modern earthquake. It was the day that nearly all life on Earth went extinct, including the dinosaurs...
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This combination of Dec. 2, 2018 photos made available by NASA shows a set of stereoscopic images of a large, 170-foot (52-meter) boulder that juts from asteroid Bennu's southern hemisphere and the rocky slopes that surround it. The 3D images were captured by the Osiris-Rex spacecraft. (NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona via AP)
March 28, 2019 - 1:39 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA has released a pair of artsy shots of two little asteroids. Thursday's picture shows an asteroid coming apart at its dusty seams, courtesy of the Hubble Space Telescope . Two long comet-like tails are streaming from asteroid Gault, a 2.5-mile-wide (4-kilometer-wide...
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FILE - This artist's rendering made available by NASA in July 2016 shows the mapping of the near-Earth asteroid Bennu by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft. Scientists had thought the asteroid Bennu had wide, open areas to scoop up dirt and gravel. But on Tuesday, March 19, 2019, NASA announced the probe hasn’t found any big spots for sampling. (NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona via AP)
March 19, 2019 - 4:40 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — NASA's plan to scoop up dirt and gravel from an asteroid has hit a snag, but scientists say they can overcome it. The asteroid Bennu was thought to have wide, open areas suitable for the task. But a recently arrived spacecraft revealed the asteroid is covered with boulders and there...
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