Archaeology

Mourners carry the flag-draped coffin of Iraqi archaeologist, Lamia al-Gailani, for burial during her funeral procession in the National Museum in Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, Jan. 21, 2019. Iraq is mourning the loss of a beloved archaeologist who helped rebuild her country's leading museum in the aftermath of the U.S. invasion in 2003. (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)
January 21, 2019 - 4:51 am
BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq on Monday mourned the loss of Lamia al-Gailani, a beloved archaeologist who helped rebuild the Baghdad museum after it was looted following the 2003 U.S.-led invasion to oust Saddam Hussein. Al-Gailani, who died in Amman, Jordan, on Friday at the age of 80, was one of Iraq's...
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January 21, 2019 - 3:37 am
BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq is mourning the loss of a beloved archaeologist who helped rebuild her country's leading museum in the aftermath of the U.S. invasion in 2003. Lamia al-Gailani, who died on Friday at the age of 80, was one of Iraq's first women to excavate the country's rich archaeological...
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January 20, 2019 - 10:57 am
BAGHDAD (AP) — An Iraqi archaeologist, who lent her expertise to rebuild the collection at the National Museum after it was looted in 2003, has died. Lamia al-Gailani was a devotee of Iraq's heritage and museums, and one of the first female Iraqi archaeologists to excavate the country's ancient...
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In this 2018 photo provided by Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, INAH, a skull-like stone carving and a stone trunk depicting the Flayed Lord, a pre-Hispanic fertility god depicted as a skinned human corpse, are stored after being excavated from the Ndachjian–Tehuacan archaeological site in Tehuacan, Puebla state, where archaeologists have discovered the first temple dedicated to the deity. Although depictions of the god, Xipe Totec, had been found before in other cultures, a whole temple had never been discovered. (Meliton Tapia Davila/INAH via AP)
January 02, 2019 - 8:54 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexican experts have found the first temple of the Flayed Lord, a pre-Hispanic fertility god depicted as a skinned human corpse, authorities said Wednesday. Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History said the find was made during recent excavations of Popoloca Indian...
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An archaeologist inspects the remains of a horse skeleton in the Pompeii archaeological site, Italy, Sunday, Dec. 23, 2018. A tall horse, well-groomed with the saddle and the richly decorated bronze trimmings, believed to have belonged to an high rank military magistrate has been recently discovered, Professor Massimo Osanna, director of the Pompeii archeological site said to the Italian news agency ANSA. (Cesare Abbate/ANSA Via AP)
December 23, 2018 - 1:51 pm
ROME (AP) — Archaeologists have unearthed the petrified remains of a harnessed horse and saddle in the stable of an ancient villa in a Pompeii suburb. Pompeii archaeological park head Massimo Osanna told Italian news agency ANSA that the villa belonged to a high-ranking military officer, perhaps a...
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This Jan. 28, 1915 made available by the U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command shows the USS San Diego while serving as flagship of the Pacific Fleet. Her name had been changed from California in September 1914. On a clear summer day, July 19, 1918, an external explosion near the ship’s engine room shook the armored cruiser. Water soon rushed into the hull. Within minutes, the 500-foot warship began to capsize. Weighed down with 2,900 tons coal for a planned voyage across the Atlantic Ocean, the vessel sank in just 20 minutes. Six crew members perished. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via AP)
December 13, 2018 - 11:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A hundred years ago, a mysterious explosion hit the only major U.S. warship to sink during World War I. Now the Navy believes it has the answer to what doomed the USS San Diego: An underwater mine set by a German submarine cruising in waters just miles from New York City. That's...
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This undated photo released by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities, shows an archaeologist working on a block of limestone that was found in the temple of Ra, the ancient Egyptian god of the sun, in the Matariya neighborhood of Cairo, Egypt. The Antiquities Ministry said Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2018, that archaeologists digging in Cairo found two blocks of limestone with inscriptions belonging to an engineer who worked for Ramses II, one of the longest ruling pharaohs in antiquity. (Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities via AP)
November 21, 2018 - 11:45 am
CAIRO (AP) — Egypt says archaeologists digging in Cairo have found two blocks of limestone with inscriptions belonging to an engineer who worked for Ramses II, one of the longest ruling pharaohs in antiquity. The Antiquities Ministry said on Wednesday that the artifacts were found in the Temple of...
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CORRECTS TITLE OF THE FIGURE SHOWN IN THE FRESCO, FROM GODDESS TO QUEEN OF SPARTA - The fresco ''Leda e il cigno'' (Leda and the swan) discovered last Friday in the Regio V archeological area in Pompeii, near Naples, Italy, is seen Monday, Nov. 19, 2018. The fresco depicts a story and art subject of Greek mythology, with Queen of Sparta Leda being impregnated by Zeus - Jupiter in Roman mythology - in the form of a swan. (Cesare Abbate/ANSA via AP)
November 19, 2018 - 2:24 pm
ROME (AP) — Archaeologists have found a fresco in an ancient Pompeii bedroom that depicts a sensual scene of the Roman god Jupiter, disguised as a swan, and a legendary queen of Sparta from Greek mythology. The figure of Leda being impregnated by the god in swan form was a fairly common home...
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CORRECTS TITLE OF THE FIGURE SHOWN IN THE FRESCO, FROM GODDESS TO QUEEN OF SPARTA - The fresco ''Leda e il cigno'' (Leda and the swan) discovered last Friday in the Regio V archeological area in Pompeii, near Naples, Italy, is seen Monday, Nov. 19, 2018. The fresco depicts a story and art subject of Greek mythology, with Queen of Sparta Leda being impregnated by Zeus - Jupiter in Roman mythology - in the form of a swan. (Cesare Abbate/ANSA via AP)
November 19, 2018 - 12:04 pm
ROME (AP) — Archaeologists have found a fresco in an ancient Pompeii bedroom that depicts a sensual scene of the Roman god Jupiter, disguised as a swan, and a legendary queen of Sparta from Greek mythology. The figure of Leda being impregnated by the god in swan form was a fairly common home...
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CORRECTS TITLE OF THE FIGURE SHOWN IN THE FRESCO, FROM GODDESS TO QUEEN OF SPARTA - The fresco ''Leda e il cigno'' (Leda and the swan) discovered last Friday in the Regio V archeological area in Pompeii, near Naples, Italy, is seen Monday, Nov. 19, 2018. The fresco depicts a story and art subject of Greek mythology, with Queen of Sparta Leda being impregnated by Zeus - Jupiter in Roman mythology - in the form of a swan. (Cesare Abbate/ANSA via AP)
November 19, 2018 - 8:56 am
ROME (AP) — Archaeologists have found in an ancient Pompeii bedroom a fresco depicting a sensual scene of a goddess and swan. Pompeii archaeological park director Massimo Osanna told Italian news agency ANSA on Monday that the figure of goddess Leda being impregnated by a swan representing Roman...
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