Animals

In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, photo, officials of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources feed milk to Marium, a baby dugong separated from her mother, on Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. The estimated 5-month-old female dugong that has developed an attachment to humans after getting lost in the ocean off southern Thailand is being nurtured by marine experts in hopes that it can one day fend for itself. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP)
June 14, 2019 - 7:42 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A baby dugong that has developed an attachment to humans after being separated from its mother and getting lost in the ocean off southern Thailand is being nurtured by marine experts in hopes that it can one day fend for itself. The estimated 5-month-old female dugong named Marium...
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June 14, 2019 - 3:31 am
HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Authorities have seized 7.5 tons of elephant ivory and pangolin scales in one of Vietnam's biggest wildlife trafficking cases. The 3.5 tons of ivory and 4 tons of pangolin scales were found Wednesday in barrels when customs officers checked a shipping container arriving at...
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Guatemalan farm hands on their way to work in Mexican fields from Guatemala toward Frontera Hidalgo, Mexico, Thursday, June 13, 2019. The Suchiate cuts a winding north-south course en route to the Pacific Ocean, the westernmost part of Mexico’s expansive southern frontier with Guatemala and Belize. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
June 13, 2019 - 11:15 pm
FRONTERA HIDALGO, Mexico (AP) — It was still dark when the first Guatemalan farm worker walked ashore in Mexico early Thursday, just the bottoms of his shorts damp from the shallow ford of the Suchiate River. As the sky brightened, another man drove a big blue tractor across the muddy waters to...
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Guatemalan farm hands on their way to work in Mexican fields from Guatemala toward Frontera Hidalgo, Mexico, Thursday, June 13, 2019. The Suchiate cuts a winding north-south course en route to the Pacific Ocean, the westernmost part of Mexico’s expansive southern frontier with Guatemala and Belize. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
June 13, 2019 - 5:45 pm
FRONTERA HIDALGO, Mexico (AP) — It was still dark when the first Guatemalan farm worker walked ashore in Mexico early Thursday, just the bottoms of his shorts damp from the shallow ford of the Suchiate River. As the sky brightened, another man drove a big blue tractor across the muddy waters to...
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The head of an Ice Age wolf, at the Mammoth Fauna Study Department at the Academy of Sciences of Yakutia, Russia, June 10, 2019. Experts believe the wolf roamed the earth about 40,000 years ago, but thanks to Siberia's frozen permafrost its brain, fur, tissues and even its tongue have been perfectly preserved, as scientific investigations are underway after it was found in August 2018. (Valery Plotnikov/Mammoth Fauna Study Department at the Academy of Sciences of Yakutia via AP)
June 13, 2019 - 2:42 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian scientists have found the furry head of an Ice Age wolf perfectly preserved in the Siberian permafrost. The head of a wolf, which died 40,000 years ago, was discovered in the Russian Arctic region of Yakutia. Valery Plotnikov, a top researcher at the local branch of the...
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In this May 13, 2019, photo, Bella the vervet monkey looks at the camera at Primates Inc., in Westfield, Wis. Besides Bella, previously a pet, the sanctuary has five rhesus macaque monkeys that were previously used in medical research. More research labs are retiring primates to sanctuaries like Primates Inc., a 17-acre rural compound in central Wisconsin, where they can live their remaining years after research studies are done, according to sanctuaries and researchers. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
June 13, 2019 - 7:45 am
WESTFIELD, Wis. (AP) — Izzle, Timon, Batman, River and Mars spent years confined inside a lab, their lives devoted to being tested for the benefit of human health. But these rhesus macaques have paid their dues and are now living in retirement — in larger enclosures that let them venture outside,...
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In this May 13, 2019, photo, Bella the vervet monkey looks at the camera at Primates Inc., in Westfield, Wis. Besides Bella, previously a pet, the sanctuary has five rhesus macaque monkeys that were previously used in medical research. More research labs are retiring primates to sanctuaries like Primates Inc., a 17-acre rural compound in central Wisconsin, where they can live their remaining years after research studies are done, according to sanctuaries and researchers. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
June 13, 2019 - 3:37 am
WESTFIELD, Wis. (AP) — Izzle, Timon, Batman, River and Mars spent years confined to inside of a lab, their lives devoted to being tested for the benefit of human health. But these rhesus macaques have paid their dues and are now living in retirement — in larger enclosures that let them venture...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 1:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one-sixth of their fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 1:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 12:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
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