Animal population control

This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows a mature northern fur seal standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 8:31 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location: a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows northern fur seal pups standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 7:08 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location: a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows northern fur seal pups standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 1:17 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location _ a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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September 26, 2019 - 3:21 pm
LOS BANOS, Calif. (AP) — In a story Sept. 25 about (topic), The Associated Press reported erroneously that the Central Valley is an agricultural region 130 miles (210 kilometers) north of Sacramento. The Central Valley region spans about 400 miles (645 kilometers) from Redding to Bakersfield,...
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This April 18, 2019, photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a nutria in Merced County, Calif. With $10 million in state funding, the Department of Fish and Wildlife is preparing to deploy new tactics in its efforts to eradicate nutria. (California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP)
September 25, 2019 - 1:20 pm
LOS BANOS, Calif. (AP) — One of the most recent threats to California's environment has webbed feet, white whiskers, shaggy fur and orange buck teeth that could be mistaken for carrots. "Boy, they're an ugly-looking thing," said David Passadori, an almond and walnut grower in central California. "...
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This April 18, 2019, photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a nutria in Merced County, Calif. With $10 million in state funding, the Department of Fish and Wildlife is preparing to deploy new tactics in its efforts to eradicate nutria. (California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP)
September 25, 2019 - 1:23 am
LOS BANOS, Calif. (AP) — One of the most recent threats to California's environment has webbed feet, white whiskers, shaggy fur and orange buck teeth that could be mistaken for carrots. "Boy, they're an ugly-looking thing," said David Passadori, an almond and walnut grower in central California. "...
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File - In this May 4, 2010, file photo, a sea lion tosses a partially eaten salmon in the Columbia River near Bonneville Dam, where six more sea lions were trapped earlier in the day with one to be euthanized, in North Bonneville, Wash. More than 1,100 sea lions could be killed annually in a nearly 300-mile stretch of the Columbia River on the Oregon-Washington border to boost faltering populations of salmon and steelhead. The National Marine Fisheries Service said Friday, Aug. 30, 2019, it's taking public comments on the plan requested by Idaho, Oregon, Washington and tribes in those states. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
August 30, 2019 - 5:32 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — More than 1,100 sea lions could be killed annually along a stretch of the Columbia River on the Oregon-Washington border to boost faltering populations of salmon and steelhead, federal officials said Friday. The National Marine Fisheries Service said it's taking public comments...
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August 30, 2019 - 1:05 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — More than 1,100 sea lions could be killed annually along a stretch of the Columbia River to boost faltering populations of salmon and steelhead. Billions of dollars have been spent in Idaho, Oregon and Washington to save 13 species of Columbia Basin salmon and steelhead...
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A Royal Bengal tiger rests at its enclosure at the Alipore zoo in Kolkata, India, Monday, July 29, 2019. India's tiger population has grown to nearly 3,000, making the country one of the safest habitats for the endangered animals.Prime Minister Narendra Modi released the tiger count for 2018 on Monday said it's a "historic achievement" for India as the big cat's population had dwindled to 1,400 about 14-15 years ago. (AP Photo/Bikas Das)
July 29, 2019 - 6:30 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — India's tiger population has grown to nearly 3,000, making the country one of the safest habitats for the endangered animals. Prime Minister Narendra Modi released the tiger count for 2018 on Monday and said it's a "historic achievement" for India, whose big cat population had...
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FILE- In this May 5, 2009 file photo, a tiger cools off at its enclosure at the zoo in Ahmadabad, India. India's tiger population has grown to nearly 3,000, making the country one of the safest habitats for the endangered animals. Prime Minister Narendra Modi says it's a "historic achievement" for India as the big cat's population had dwindled to 1,400 about 14-15 years ago. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki, File)
July 29, 2019 - 3:58 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — India's tiger population has grown to nearly 3,000, making the country one of the safest habitats for the endangered animals. Prime Minister Narendra Modi released the tiger count for 2018 on Monday said it's a "historic achievement" for India as the big cat's population had...
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