Animal feed manufacturing

In this March 2016 photo provided by The Island Institute, Bigelow Laboratory Research Associate Brittney Honisch measures a piece of sugar kelp before harvest in Casco Bay, Maine. A group of scientists with Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences and farmers in northern New England are working on a plan to feed seaweed to cows to gauge whether it can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. (Scott Sell/The Island Institute via AP)
December 29, 2019 - 10:28 am
FREEPORT, Maine (AP) — Coastal Maine has a lot of seaweed , and a fair number of cows. A group of scientists and farmers think that pairing the two could help unlock a way to cope with a warming world. The researchers — from a marine science lab, an agriculture center and universities in northern...
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FILE - This May 28, 2015 file photo shows cheddar cheese Madison, Wis. The practice of adding color to cheddar cheese reaches back to when cheesemakers in England skimmed the butterfat from milk to make butter, according to Elizabeth Chubbuck of Murray’s Cheese in New York. The leftover milk was whiter, so pigments were added to recreate butterfat’s golden hue, she said. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)
December 10, 2018 - 4:55 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Many companies including McDonald's and Kellogg are purging artificial colors from their foods, but don't expect your cheeseburgers or cereal to look much different. Colors send important signals about food, and companies aren't going to stop playing into those perceptions. What's...
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FILE - This May 28, 2015 file photo shows cheddar cheese Madison, Wis. The practice of adding color to cheddar cheese reaches back to when cheesemakers in England skimmed the butterfat from milk to make butter, according to Elizabeth Chubbuck of Murray’s Cheese in New York. The leftover milk was whiter, so pigments were added to recreate butterfat’s golden hue, she said. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)
December 10, 2018 - 10:21 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Many companies including McDonald's and Kellogg are purging artificial colors from their foods, but don't expect your cheeseburgers or cereal to look much different. Colors send important signals about food, and companies aren't going to stop playing into those perceptions. What's...
Read More