Amphibians

This Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019 photo shows male mosquitos at the the Vosshall Laboratory at Rockefeller University in New York. In 2018, researchers at the lab published a much-improved description of the DNA code for a particularly dangerous species of mosquito: Aedes aegypti, notorious for spreading Zika, dengue and yellow fever. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
March 29, 2019 - 12:36 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Just about every week, it seems, scientists publish the unique DNA code of some creature or plant. Just in February, they published the genome for the strawberry, the paper mulberry tree, the great white shark and the Antarctic blackfin icefish. They also announced that, thanks to a...
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This Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019 photo shows male mosquitos at the the Vosshall Laboratory at Rockefeller University in New York. In 2018, researchers at the lab published a much-improved description of the DNA code for a particularly dangerous species of mosquito: Aedes aegypti, notorious for spreading Zika, dengue and yellow fever. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
March 29, 2019 - 11:25 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Just about every week, it seems, scientists publish the unique DNA code of some creature or plant. Just in February, they published the genome for the strawberry, the paper mulberry tree, the great white shark and the Antarctic blackfin icefish. They also announced that, thanks to a...
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FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2017 file photo, water flows from five of the gates on Shasta Dam for the first time in six years. trio of salamander species in Northern California could complicate a controversial $1.4 billion public works project to heighten the Shasta Dam, the state's largest reservoir. The Los Angeles Times reports Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2018, that two environmental groups filed a federal lawsuit last month asking a judge to force the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to determine if Shasta salamanders should be protected under the Endangered Species Act. (Greg Barnette/Record Searchlight via AP, File)
December 26, 2018 - 2:57 pm
SHASTA LAKE, Calif. (AP) — A trio of salamander species in Northern California could complicate a controversial $1.4 billion public works project to heighten the Shasta Dam, the state's largest reservoir. The Los Angeles Times reports Wednesday that two environmental groups filed a federal lawsuit...
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December 26, 2018 - 1:56 pm
SHASTA LAKE, Calif. (AP) — A trio of salamander species in Northern California could complicate a controversial $1.4 billion public works project to heighten the Shasta Dam, the state's largest reservoir. The Los Angeles Times reports Wednesday that two environmental groups filed a federal lawsuit...
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Firefighters at Chester Zoo after a fire broke out in the Monsoon Forest habitat area of the zoo, in Chester, England, Saturday Dec. 15, 2018. The fire forced keepers to evacuate visitors and move animals away from the fire, with winds fanning flames in the inflatable roof of the building.(Peter Byrne/PA via AP)
December 16, 2018 - 8:33 am
LONDON (AP) — A zoo in northwest England says insects, frogs, fish and small birds perished in a fire that broke out in an enclosure devoted to exotic tropical habitats. Chester Zoo said in a statement issued on Sunday that keepers were able to lure all mammal species to safety, including...
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In this undated photo provided by researchers in December 2018, a male tungara frog in Panama uses his vocal sac to call out in Gamboa, Panama. A study released on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018, examines why these amphibians adapt their mating calls in urban areas _ an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on forests. (Adam Dunn via AP)
December 10, 2018 - 11:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — City frogs and rainforest frogs don't sing the same tune, researchers have found. A study released Monday examined why Panama's tiny tungara frogs adapt their mating calls in urban areas — an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on...
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FILE - This Sept. 27, 2011, file photo shows a gopher frog at the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans. The U.S. Supreme Court said Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018 that a Louisiana-based federal appeals court must take another look at a federal agency’s designation of a tract of Louisiana timberland as “critical habitat” for gopher frogs, endangered frogs currently found only in Mississippi. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
November 27, 2018 - 5:25 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Federal judges must look again at an agency's decision to declare a tract of Louisiana timberland "critical habitat" for an endangered Southeastern frog, following a ruling Tuesday by the nation's highest court. The U.S. Supreme Court's 8-0 ruling concerns the endangered dusky...
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July 11, 2018 - 12:01 pm
PLYMOUTH, Ind. (AP) — An alligator that was hanging out in a northern Indiana retention pond has been captured after being lured to shore with a frog. Brandon Crawford of Goshen tells WSBT-TV that he and a friend captured the reptile about 3 a.m. Wednesday and turned it over to police in Plymouth,...
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This April 24, 2018 photo provided by Clara do Amaral shows a wood frog in Ohio. In a report released on Tuesday, May 1, 2018, scientists have found that wood frogs, which don’t urinate in the winter, recycle urea _ the main waste in urine _ into useful nitrogen which keeps the small animals alive as they hibernate and freeze, inside and out. It doesn’t warm them up, but protects cells and tissues, even as the amphibian’s heart, brain and bloodstream stop. (Clara do Amaral, Mount St. Joseph University via AP)
May 01, 2018 - 7:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — If you've ever been unable to find a bathroom in a moment of need, you know the gotta-go feeling. That's nothing compared to the wood frog, which doesn't urinate all winter. In Alaska, wood frogs go eight months without peeing. And scientists have now figured out how they do it,...
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This undated photo provided by Corinne Richards-Zawacki in March 2018 shows a healthy golden frog in the streams of Panama. A deadly fungal disease devastated amphibians in Central America more than a decade ago, quieting some mountain streams. But new research released on Thursday, March 28, 2018 shows evolution may have saved the day _ and the frogs. (Corinne Richards-Zawacki/via AP)
March 29, 2018 - 2:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — After years of silence, the rhythmic dee-dee-deeps of frogs and toads are returning in parts of Panama. A deadly fungal disease devastated amphibians in Central America more than a decade ago, quieting some mountain streams. But new research shows evolution may have saved the day...
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