Alcoholic beverage manufacturing

Sen. Lyle Hillyard, R-Logan, speaks during an interview outside the Senate floor Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019, in Salt Lake City. Utah is moving closer to shedding low alcohol limits for beer in grocery stores, despite opposition from the Mormon church and a number of local brewers. The state Senate easily passed a measure on Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019, that would bring it in line with most other states in doing away with low-alcohol beers. It now goes to the House, where it's expected to face more opposition. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
February 26, 2019 - 7:01 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah lawmakers moved closer Tuesday to adopting alcohol levels for beer that are in line with most production-line brews sold around the country, despite opposition from the influential Mormon church. The state Senate overwhelming passed the measure to raise low alcohol limits...
Read More
In this photo taken Jan. 25, 2019, Joe Ibrahim, head winemaker at Willamette Valley Vineyards in Turner, Ore., displays a bottle of rose of pinot noir made from grapes grown in southern Oregon that a California winemaker canceled a contract on purchasing just before harvest, claiming they were tainted by wildfire smoke. A federal agency approved the label for the wine, which four Oregon wineries collaborated on to save the winegrowers from financial ruin, just before the government shutdown, but label applications for chardonnay and pinot noir made from the salvaged grapes are among a huge backlog at the federal agency awaiting approval. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky)
January 30, 2019 - 2:44 pm
TURNER, Ore. (AP) — Winegrowers in southern Oregon faced financial ruin after a California winemaker claimed wildfire smoke tainted their grapes and refused to buy them. Now, the rejected fruit that was turned into wine by local vintners is facing another setback. Two Oregon wineries stepped in to...
Read More
FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2018 file photo, with a downed power utility pole in the foreground, Eric England, right, searches through a friend's vehicle after the wildfire burned through Paradise, Calif. Pacific Gas & Electric Corp. is expected to file for bankruptcy protection Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
January 29, 2019 - 1:05 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California regulators were poised for a bankruptcy declaration by the nation's largest utility as it faces billions of dollars in potential damages from wildfires in the state. Pacific Gas and Electric Corp. had said the decision could come on Tuesday, and the California Public...
Read More
A general view of the Fullers brewery in Chiswick, west London, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. Japanese brewer Asahi is buying Fuller Smith & Turner’s beer business for 250 million pounds ($327 million), in a deal that includes its flagship London Pride. (Steve Parsons/PA via AP)
January 25, 2019 - 8:51 am
LONDON (AP) — Japanese brewer Asahi is buying the beer business of Britain's Fuller Smith & Turner's for 250 million pounds ($327 million), in a deal that includes its flagship London Pride. The deal announced Friday includes the Griffin Brewery in the London neighborhood of Chiswick, where the...
Read More
FILE- In this Jan. 9, 2019, file photo Michael Northern, vice president of WJP Restaurant Group, stands next to an empty table at dinnertime at Rocket City Tavern near numerous federal agencies in Huntsville, Ala. Businesses that count heavily on federal employees as customers are feeling the punishing effects of the government shutdown. Northern said business is down 35 percent. “People are just going home and nesting, trying to conserve resources,” said Northern. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
January 24, 2019 - 6:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — From power restaurants in Washington and a belt-buckle maker in Colorado to a brewery in California, businesses that count heavily on federal employees as customers are feeling the punishing effects of the government shutdown. In many cases, it's forcing them to cut workers' hours...
Read More
People demonstrate in Richmond, Va., to support The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and Bureau of Prisons employees who are affected by the partial government shut down Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. (Alexa Welch Edlund/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)
January 24, 2019 - 5:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — From power restaurants in Washington and a belt-buckle maker in Colorado to a brewery in California, businesses that count heavily on federal employees as customers are feeling the punishing effects of the government shutdown. In many cases, it's forcing them to cut workers' hours...
Read More
FILE- In this Jan. 18, 2019, file photo passengers wait in line at a security checkpoint at Miami International Airport in Miami. While security screeners and air traffic controllers have been told to keep working, Federal Aviation Administration safety inspectors weren’t, until the agency began recalling some Jan. 12. About 2,200 of the more than 3,000 inspectors are now back on the job, overseeing work done by airlines, aircraft manufacturers and repair shops. The government says they’re doing critical work but forgoing such tasks as issuing new pilot certificates.(AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
January 20, 2019 - 12:18 pm
You and your loved ones aren't federal employees or contractors, and you don't live in a setting or have a job closely tied to government programs. So what does the government shutdown have to do with you? More than you might think. Washington's doings, or not-doings, can be woven into everyday...
Read More
January 20, 2019 - 12:16 pm
You and your loved ones aren't federal employees or contractors, and you don't live in a setting or have a job closely tied to government programs. So what does the government shutdown have to do with you? More than you might think. Washington's doings, or not-doings, can be woven into everyday...
Read More
Sean Mossman, director of sales and marketing for COOP Ale Works, draws a beer in the COOP taproom in Oklahoma City, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019. Rules that went into effect in Oklahoma in October allow grocery, convenience and retail liquor stores to sell chilled beer with an alcohol content of up to 8.99 percent. Previously, grocery and convenience stores could offer only 3.2 percent beer. Liquor stores, where stronger beers were available, were prohibited from selling it cold. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
January 19, 2019 - 11:23 am
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Beer snobs are raising their mugs to a stronger brew in three states that once forbade grocers from selling anything but low-alcohol brands, and the changes could indirectly chill the industry in two others where such regulations remain. Until October, Oklahoma grocery and...
Read More
Sean Mossman, director of sales and marketing for COOP Ale Works, draws a beer in the COOP taproom in Oklahoma City, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019. Rules that went into effect in Oklahoma in October allow grocery, convenience and retail liquor stores to sell chilled beer with an alcohol content of up to 8.99 percent. Previously, grocery and convenience stores could offer only 3.2 percent beer. Liquor stores, where stronger beers were available, were prohibited from selling it cold. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
January 19, 2019 - 10:49 am
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Beer snobs are raising their mugs to a stronger brew in three states that once forbid grocers from selling anything but low-alcohol brands, and the changes could indirectly chill the industry in two others where such regulations remain. Until October, Oklahoma grocery and...
Read More

Pages