Aerospace and defense industry

This June 6, 2017 photo shows NASA astronaut candidate Robb Kulin at Ellington Field in Houston. Kulin has resigned halfway through his two years of training at Johnson Space Center in Houston. A NASA spokeswoman says his departure is effective Friday, Aug. 31, 2018, and that he is leaving for personal reasons that the space agency cannot discuss due to privacy laws. (Robert Markowitz/NASA via AP)
August 28, 2018 - 12:12 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — For the first time in 50 years, an astronaut-in-training is quitting NASA. Astronaut candidate Robb Kulin has resigned halfway through his two years of training at Johnson Space Center in Houston. A NASA spokeswoman says his departure is effective Friday and that he is...
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FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2017, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks at George Mason University Arlington, Va., campus. Complaints and lawsuits lodged against for-profit colleges are unfolding as DeVos engineers a seismic shift in the regulatory landscape that stands to benefit the multibillion-dollar industry. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
August 24, 2018 - 7:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A lawsuit against Ashford University describes an admissions office with a cutthroat sales culture more akin to a used-car lot than a place of higher learning, peddling "false promises and faulty information" to lure students eligible for federal financial aid. Sound familiar? The...
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FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2017, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks at George Mason University Arlington, Va., campus. Complaints and lawsuits lodged against for-profit colleges are unfolding as DeVos engineers a seismic shift in the regulatory landscape that stands to benefit the multibillion-dollar industry. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
August 24, 2018 - 1:58 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A lawsuit against Ashford University describes an admissions office with a cutthroat sales culture more akin to a used-car lot than a place of higher learning, peddling "false promises and faulty information" to lure students eligible for federal financial aid. Sound familiar? The...
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August 24, 2018 - 1:22 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A lawsuit against Ashford University describes an admissions office with a cutthroat sales culture more akin to a used-car lot than a place of higher learning, peddling "false promises and faulty information" to lure students eligible for federal financial aid. Sound familiar? The...
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FILE - In this May 22, 2018, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies at a House Committee on Education and the Workforce on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Education Department said Aug. 23 that it is weighing whether to allow states to use federal funds to purchase guns for schools, prompting a storm of criticism from Democratic lawmakers and educators. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
August 24, 2018 - 12:21 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Education Department says it is weighing whether to allow states to use federal funds to purchase guns for schools, prompting a storm of criticism from Democratic lawmakers and educators. If approved, the plan would likely generate a lot of controversy at a time when a string...
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FILE - In this May 22, 2018, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies at a House Committee on Education and the Workforce on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Education Department said Aug. 23 that it is weighing whether to allow states to use federal funds to purchase guns for schools, prompting a storm of criticism from Democratic lawmakers and educators. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
August 23, 2018 - 10:41 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Education Department said Thursday that it is weighing whether to allow states to use federal funds to purchase guns for schools, prompting a storm of criticism from Democratic lawmakers and educators. If approved, the plan would likely generate a lot of controversy at a time...
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FILE - In this May 22, 2018, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies at a House Committee on Education and the Workforce on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Education Department said Aug. 23 that it is weighing whether to allow states to use federal funds to purchase guns for schools, prompting a storm of criticism from Democratic lawmakers and educators. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
August 23, 2018 - 10:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Education Department said Thursday that it is weighing whether to allow states to use federal funds to purchase guns for schools, prompting a storm of criticism from Democratic lawmakers and educators. If approved, the plan would likely generate a lot of controversy at a time...
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FILE - In this May 22, 2018, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies at a House Committee on Education and the Workforce on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Education Department said Aug. 23 that it is weighing whether to allow states to use federal funds to purchase guns for schools, prompting a storm of criticism from Democratic lawmakers and educators. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
August 23, 2018 - 7:20 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Education Department said Thursday that it is weighing whether to allow states to use federal funds to purchase guns for schools, prompting a storm of criticism from Democratic lawmakers and educators. If approved, the plan would likely generate a lot of controversy at a time...
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FILE - In this May 22, 2018, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies at a House Committee on Education and the Workforce on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Education Department said Aug. 23 that it is weighing whether to allow states to use federal funds to purchase guns for schools, prompting a storm of criticism from Democratic lawmakers and educators. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
August 23, 2018 - 5:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Education Department said Thursday that it is weighing whether to allow states to use federal funds to purchase guns for schools, prompting a storm of criticism from Democratic lawmakers and educators. If approved, the plan would likely generate a lot of controversy at a time...
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David Hogg, center right, a survivor of the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla., walks in a planned 50-mile march, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018, in Worcester, Mass. The march, held to call for gun law reforms, began Thursday, in Worcester, and is scheduled to end Sunday, Aug. 26, 2018, in Springfield, Mass., at the headquarters of gun manufacturer Smith & Wesson. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
August 23, 2018 - 2:02 pm
WORCESTER, Mass. (AP) — Gun control advocates, including one of the survivors of the Parkland, Florida, school shooting and the parents of one of the victims, are marching 50 miles (80 kilometers) across Massachusetts this week to the headquarters of gun manufacturer Smith & Wesson as part of a...
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