Access to health care

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting on the Coronavirus with health care company leaders, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Tuesday, March 10, 2020, in Washington. From left, Pence, Trump, Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Seema Verma, and CEO of UnitedHealth Group Dave Wichmann. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
March 10, 2020 - 4:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Major insurers pledged to cover coronavirus tests at no cost to patients at the White House Tuesday, but those assurances — while welcome — may not resolve public concerns about testing. For one, insurers can't control the availability of the tests themselves. While the capacity...
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In this March 5, 2020, photo, a Royal Mail employee wears gloves as he hold parcels and the signature handheld as he delivers in London. While white collar workers trying to avoid contagion can work from home or call in sick if they experience symptoms of the new virus, such precautions are not an options for the millions of waiters, delivery workers, cashiers, ride-hailing drivers, museum attendants and countless others who routinely come into contact with the public. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
March 10, 2020 - 7:20 am
LONDON (AP) — A barber in Beijing is supporting his wife and child by charging food and other expenses to a credit card while he waits for his employer's shop to reopen. A waiter at a barbecue restaurant in Kansas City, Missouri, washes his hands more often and hopes for the best. A parcel delivery...
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FILE - In this March 3, 2020, file photo, the New National Stadium, a venue for the opening and closing ceremonies at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, is seen from Shibuya Sky observation deck in Tokyo. The tentacles of cancelling the Tokyo Olympics — or postponing or staging it in empty venues — would reach into every corner of the globe, much like the spreading virus that now imperils the opening ceremony on July 24. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
March 10, 2020 - 6:57 am
TOKYO (AP) — The tentacles of canceling the Tokyo Olympics — or postponing or staging it in empty venues — would reach into every corner of the globe, much like the spreading virus that now imperils the opening ceremony on July 24. The International Olympic Committee and local organizers say the...
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In this March 5, 2020, photo, a Royal Mail employee wears gloves as he hold parcels and the signature handheld as he delivers in London. While white collar workers trying to avoid contagion can work from home or call in sick if they experience symptoms of the new virus, such precautions are not an options for the millions of waiters, delivery workers, cashiers, ride-hailing drivers, museum attendants and countless others who routinely come into contact with the public. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
March 10, 2020 - 6:39 am
LONDON (AP) — A barber in Beijing is supporting his wife and child by charging food and other expenses to a credit card while he waits for his employer's shop to reopen. A waiter at a barbecue restaurant in Kansas City, Missouri, washes his hands more often and hopes for the best. A parcel delivery...
Read More
FILE - In this March 3, 2020, file photo, the New National Stadium, a venue for the opening and closing ceremonies at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, is seen from Shibuya Sky observation deck in Tokyo. The tentacles of cancelling the Tokyo Olympics — or postponing or staging it in empty venues — would reach into every corner of the globe, much like the spreading virus that now imperils the opening ceremony on July 24. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
March 10, 2020 - 4:15 am
TOKYO (AP) — The tentacles of canceling the Tokyo Olympics — or postponing or staging it in empty venues — would reach into every corner of the globe, much like the spreading virus that now imperils the opening ceremony on July 24. The International Olympic Committee and local organizers say the...
Read More
In this March 5, 2020, photo, a waitress of the Chinese restaurant Hot Pot serves customers in London. While white collar workers trying to avoid contagion can work from home or call in sick if they experience symptoms of the virus, such precautions are not an options for the millions of waiters, delivery workers, cashiers, ride-hailing drivers, museum attendants and countless others who routinely come into contact with the public. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
March 10, 2020 - 3:36 am
LONDON (AP) — A barber in Beijing is supporting his wife and child by charging food and other expenses to a credit card while he waits for his employer's shop to reopen. A waiter at a barbecue restaurant in Kansas City, Missouri, washes his hands more often and hopes for the best. A parcel delivery...
Read More
In this March 5, 2020, photo, a waitress of the Chinese restaurant Hot Pot serves customers in London. While white collar workers trying to avoid contagion can work from home or call in sick if they experience symptoms of the virus, such precautions are not an options for the millions of waiters, delivery workers, cashiers, ride-hailing drivers, museum attendants and countless others who routinely come into contact with the public. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
March 10, 2020 - 12:09 am
LONDON (AP) — A barber in Beijing is supporting his wife and child by charging food and other expenses to a credit card while he waits for his employer's shop to reopen. A waiter at a barbecue restaurant in Kansas City, Missouri, washes his hands more often and hopes for the best. A parcel delivery...
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A man wears a face mask in central Madrid, Spain, Monday, March 9, 2020. Health authorities in the Madrid region say that infections for the new coronavirus have more than doubled in the past 24 hours. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
March 09, 2020 - 1:08 pm
ROME (AP) — The Latest on the coronavirus epidemic sweeping the globe (all times local): 6:10 p.m. Major Seattle businesses including Amazon, Microsoft, Starbucks and Alaska Airlines are chipping in to help those hit hardest economically by the new coronavirus. The companies joined with the city of...
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President Donald Trump holds up an $8.3 billion bill to fight the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S., Friday, March 6, 2020 at the White House in Washington after signing, as Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, looks on. The legislation provides federal public health agencies with money for vaccines, tests and potential treatments and helps state and local governments prepare and respond to the threat. The rapid spread of the virus has rocked financial markets, interrupted travel and threatens to affect everyday life in the United States. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
March 06, 2020 - 5:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus legislation signed by President Donald Trump on Friday lets Medicare expand the use of telemedicine in outbreak areas, potentially reducing infection risks for vulnerable seniors. Coverage of telemedicine is now limited primarily to residents of rural areas facing...
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Vice President Mike Pence with President Donald Trump and White House coronavirus response coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx, speaks during a coronavirus briefing with Airline CEOs in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Wednesday, March 4, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
March 05, 2020 - 2:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A day after Vice President Mike Pence assured Americans that lab tests for coronavirus would be covered by private and government health insurance, that promise appears to be less than airtight. The bottom line: Medicare, Medicaid, and “Obamacare” insurance plans will cover the...
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