Access to health care

FILE - In this March 15, 2017, file photo, an Uber car drives through LaGuardia Airport in New York. Starting Sunday, July 1, 2018, drivers for car services and ride-hailing apps like Uber and Lyft in New York will be able to get coverage for vision care as well as phone or video appointments with doctors, industry representatives announced. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
June 29, 2018 - 2:58 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Drivers for car services and ride-hailing apps like Uber and Lyft are usually on their own when it comes to buying health insurance, but starting Sunday in New York they will now be able to get coverage for vision care as well as phone or video appointments with doctors, industry...
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June 29, 2018 - 1:25 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Drivers for car services and ride-hailing apps like Uber and Lyft are usually on their own when it comes to buying health insurance, but starting Sunday in New York they will now be able to get coverage for vision care as well as phone or video appointments with doctors, industry...
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June 29, 2018 - 1:15 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — New York drivers for car services and ride-hailing apps like Uber will get coverage for vision care as well as phone or video appointments with doctors starting Sunday. The coverage for an estimated 43,000 drivers statewide will be paid for by the Black Car Fund, a workers'...
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FILE - In March 14, 2018 file photo, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta speaks during a Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, & Transportation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration is preparing to announce a new insurance option for small firms and self-employed people that would cost less but could cover fewer benefits than current plans. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
June 19, 2018 - 10:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration Tuesday rolled out a health insurance option for small businesses and self-employed people that could lead to lower premiums but may also cover fewer benefits than current plans. Labor Secretary Alex Acosta said the new "association health plans" will...
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June 18, 2018 - 4:13 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A bipartisan group of governors is speaking out against a Trump administration decision that could narrow access to health insurance benefits for those with pre-existing conditions. Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich (KAY'-sik), Democratic Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and the...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2018, file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical conditions. Sessions said in a letter to Congress on June 7, that President Donald Trump, who campaigned on repealing the law and nearly did so his first year in office, approved the legal strategy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 09, 2018 - 8:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's decision to stop defending in court the Obama health law's popular protections for consumers with pre-existing conditions could prove risky for Republicans in the midterm elections — and nudge premiums even higher. The Justice Department said in a court...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2018, file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical conditions. Sessions said in a letter to Congress on June 7, that President Donald Trump, who campaigned on repealing the law and nearly did so his first year in office, approved the legal strategy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 09, 2018 - 12:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's decision to stop defending in court the Obama health law's popular protections for consumers with pre-existing conditions could prove risky for Republicans in the midterm elections — and nudge premiums even higher. The Justice Department said in a court...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2018, file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical conditions. Sessions said in a letter to Congress on June 7, that President Donald Trump, who campaigned on repealing the law and nearly did so his first year in office, approved the legal strategy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 08, 2018 - 4:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's decision to stop defending in court the Obama health law's popular protections for consumers with pre-existing conditions could prove risky for Republicans in the midterm elections — and nudge premiums even higher. The Justice Department said in a court...
Read More
FILE - In this April 25, 2018, file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical conditions. Sessions said in a letter to Congress on June 7, that President Donald Trump, who campaigned on repealing the law and nearly did so his first year in office, approved the legal strategy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 08, 2018 - 4:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's decision to stop defending in court the Obama health law's popular protections for consumers with pre-existing conditions could prove risky for Republicans in the midterm elections — and nudge premiums even higher. The Justice Department said in a court...
Read More
FILE - In this April 25, 2018, file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical conditions. Sessions said in a letter to Congress on June 7, that President Donald Trump, who campaigned on repealing the law and nearly did so his first year in office, approved the legal strategy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 08, 2018 - 3:10 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical...
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