Abortion

FILE - In this April 10, 2019 file photo, some members of the Ohio House applaud following their vote while others photograph protestors who unfurled banners reading "This is not a House of Worship" and "This is not a Doctor's office" following a vote on the Heartbeat Bill at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio. A group of conservative lawmakers in Ohio has introduced a bill to outlaw abortion outright, declaring a fetus a person and subjecting doctors who terminate pregnancies to potential murder charges. The legislation introduced Thursday, Nov. 14, appears to make an exception for the life of the mother.(Brooke LaValley/The Columbus Dispatch via AP, File)
November 15, 2019 - 5:02 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A group of conservative lawmakers in Ohio has introduced a bill to outlaw abortion outright except to save the pregnant woman’s life. State Rep. Candice Keller, a Republican from Middletown, says the bill’s backers are tired of taking an incremental approach to ending abortion...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2019 file photo, some members of the Ohio House applaud following their vote while others photograph protestors who unfurled banners reading "This is not a House of Worship" and "This is not a Doctor's office" following a vote on the Heartbeat Bill at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio. A group of conservative lawmakers in Ohio has introduced a bill to outlaw abortion outright, declaring a fetus a person and subjecting doctors who terminate pregnancies to potential murder charges. The legislation introduced Thursday, Nov. 14, appears to make an exception for the life of the mother.(Brooke LaValley/The Columbus Dispatch via AP, File)
November 15, 2019 - 3:38 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A group of conservative lawmakers in Ohio has introduced a bill to outlaw abortion outright except to save the pregnant woman’s life. State Rep. Candice Keller, a Republican from Middletown, says the bill’s backers are tired of taking an incremental approach to ending abortion...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019 file photo, August Mulvihill, of Norwalk, Iowa, center, holds a sign depicting a wire clothes hanger during a rally at the Statehouse in Des Moines, Iowa, to protest recent abortion bans. On Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019, a federal judge in New York struck down a rule letting health care clinicians object to providing abortions and other services on moral or religious grounds. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
November 06, 2019 - 1:21 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday struck down a new rule, not yet in effect, that allowed health care providers to refuse participation in abortions and other services on moral or religious grounds. U.S. District Judge Paul A. Engelmayer in New York said he was tossing out the rule in...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019 file photo, August Mulvihill, of Norwalk, Iowa, center, holds a sign depicting a wire clothes hanger during a rally at the Statehouse in Des Moines, Iowa, to protest recent abortion bans. On Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019, a federal judge in New York struck down a rule letting health care clinicians object to providing abortions and other services on moral or religious grounds. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
November 06, 2019 - 11:53 am
NEW YORK (AP) — A federal judge in New York has struck down a rule letting health care clinicians object to providing abortions and other services on moral or religious grounds. Judge Paul A. Engelmayer ruled Wednesday in Manhattan. The ruling came after health organizations and others sued the U.S...
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November 06, 2019 - 11:41 am
NEW YORK (AP) — A federal judge in New York has struck down a rule letting health care clinicians object to providing abortions and other services on moral or religious grounds. Judge Paul A. Engelmayer ruled Wednesday in Manhattan. The ruling came after health organizations and others sued the U.S...
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Dr.Colleen McNicholas, chief medical officer at Planned Parenthood, holds a plastic cannula, a piece of equipment Planned Parenthood uses during abortion procedures, as she answers questions by Planned Parenthood attorney Richard Muniz on the third day of hearings between Planned Parenthood and Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services on whether Planned Parenthood can keep its abortion license on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in St. Louis. (Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
October 30, 2019 - 8:39 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The top doctor at Missouri's sole abortion clinic on Wednesday defended its handling of four patients who faced complications — women whose care has been cited by the state as it seeks to revoke the clinic's license. The testimony from Dr. Colleen McNicholas at a hearing that could...
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Dr.Colleen McNicholas, chief medical officer at Planned Parenthood, holds a plastic cannula, a piece of equipment Planned Parenthood uses during abortion procedures, as she answers questions by Planned Parenthood attorney Richard Muniz on the third day of hearings between Planned Parenthood and Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services on whether Planned Parenthood can keep its abortion license on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in St. Louis. (Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
October 30, 2019 - 6:00 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The top doctor at Missouri's sole abortion clinic on Wednesday defended its handling of four patients who faced complications — women whose care has been cited by the state as it seeks to revoke the clinic's license. The testimony from Dr. Colleen McNicholas at a hearing that could...
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Sreenivasa Rao Dandamudi, left, commissioner of the Missouri Administrative Hearing Commission, listens as Dr. Randall Williams, director of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, answers questions from Assistant Missouri Attorney General John Sauer on the second day of hearings between Planned Parenthood and Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019, at the Wainwright State Office Building in St. Louis. At stake is whether Planned Parenthood will keep its abortion license. (Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
October 29, 2019 - 6:18 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Missouri's health department director on Tuesday said he tracked the menstrual cycles of Planned Parenthood patients as part of an effort to identify what the agency says were "failed abortions" at a St. Louis clinic. Department of Health and Senior Services Director Randall...
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Sreenivasa Rao Dandamudi, left, commissioner of the Missouri Administrative Hearing Commission, listens as Dr. Randall Williams, director of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, answers questions from Assistant Missouri Attorney General John Sauer on the second day of hearings between Planned Parenthood and Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019, at the Wainwright State Office Building in St. Louis. At stake is whether Planned Parenthood will keep its abortion license. (Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
October 29, 2019 - 5:55 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Missouri's health department director on Tuesday said he tracked the menstrual cycles of Planned Parenthood patients as part of an effort to identify what the agency says were "failed abortions" at a St. Louis clinic. Department of Health and Senior Services Director Randall...
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FILE - This Sept. 17, 2014, file photo, shows Dr. Ulrich Klopfer. Questions about what motivated the enigmatic abortion doctor to keep over 2,000 fetal remains at his Chicago-area home may never be fully answered. The remains were discovered stacked in his garage after Klopfer died at 79 on Sept. 3. (South Bend Tribune via AP, File)
October 25, 2019 - 8:53 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Questions about why an abortion doctor kept over 2,000 sets of fetal remains at his Chicago-area home may never be fully answered. There's no indication Ulrich Klopfer told others about his grim collection before he died at 79 last month. Klopfer was one of the Midwest's most...
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