Rescues Around Houston Continue

See Pictures and Hear the Latest From Southeast Texas

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The disaster in Houston is unfolding on an epic scale, with the nation's fourth-largest city mostly paralyzed by the storm that has parked itself over the Gulf Coast. With nearly 2 more feet of rain expected on top of the 30-plus inches in some places, authorities worried the worst might be yet to come. Stay with WBEN online and on air for the latest:

ON THE WBEN LIVELINE: Hear Reporter Ryan Burrow On The Scene in Houston

Rescuers meanwhile continued plucking people from inundated neighborhoods. Mayor Sylvester Turner put the number by police at more than 3,000. The Coast Guard said it also had rescued more than 3,000 by boat and air and was taking more than 1,000 calls per hour.

The storm is generating an amount of rain that would normally be seen only once in more than 1,000 years, said Edmond Russo, a deputy district engineer for the Army Corps of Engineers, which was concerned that floodwater would spill around a pair of 70-year-old reservoir dams that protect downtown Houston.

"The rain is just unbelievable.. I've lived hear all my life and I've never seen anything like it"
 - former Houston radio reporter Michael Storm

The Long Honeymoon: WNY Couple In Galveston Before the Hurricane, Stuck There 


(and yes, BTW you can't have too many Debos on WBEN. He's a distant cousin of our reporter Dave Debo)
 

President Donald Trump is expected to visit two Texas cities for updates on the devastating flooding that has paralyzed the region in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

The White House announced late Monday that the president and first lady Melania Trump will depart Tuesday morning for Corpus Christi, where they'll receive a briefing on relief efforts by local leaders and relief organizations.

The couple will then head to Austin for a tour of the Texas Department of Public Safety's Emergency Operations Center.

The trip will conclude with a briefing there from state leaders.

 

PHOTO OF HARVEY RESCUE SPREADS ON INTERNET, FRONT PAGES

AP photo

(AP) In the photo, little Aiden Pham 13 months old and swaddled in a blanket - nestles asleep in his mother's arms, even as floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey surge around them.

Someday, no doubt, Aiden's mother will tell him about the day Houston police rescued them from their flooded home by boat, and about how one officer lifted them to safety. But thanks to the careful eye of a veteran Associated Press photographer assigned to cover the storm, the world already knows the mother, child and officer as the faces of the struggle to deal with the devastation.

"I was just keeping an eye out and as soon as I saw the SWAT team member carrying her and then seeing the baby, I just couldn't believe that baby was wrapped up in there and not crying," photographer David Phillip said of the moment Sunday afternoon when his lens found the trio. "It was just tender. It was very special."

Phillip's photo shows officer Daryl Hudeck, in baseball cap and fatigues, carrying Catherine Pham and the son she cradled through knee-deep water covering Interstate 610, in southwest Houston.

Phillip said the woman and child were rescued along with the baby's father from their home in the city's Meyerland section, where water reached many roofs.

By Monday, the image had quickly become a symbol of the storm and rescue efforts, featured across the web and many front pages.

The Phams, carried to a police staging point at a high spot in the road, were quickly whisked away Sunday, giving Phillip just a minute or two to get their names and witness their relief.

"House is completely flooded, but at least we are all together," Catherine Pham posted on her Facebook page late Sunday. "We are so thankful that God was looking over us today!"

Soon after the Phams were rescued, Phillip said, he broke away to transmit the photos. It's a good thing, too. Not long after, a boat he was on hit an object underwater, probably a submerged car, and the photographer was pitched backward into the water. His leg was scraped by the boat's outboard motor before fire department rescuers could pull him on board. One of his cameras and all the images it contained were lost.

Phillip, who is 51 and has been a photographer for the AP for 22 years, all based in Houston, has covered many hurricanes. But Katrina, Ike and Rita could not prepare him for the one that has swamped his home city.

During Katrina, "I did see a lot of disturbing things, you know, dogs eating bodies and that sort of thing," he said. "But having this in your home, it's just kind of a sickening feeling. I just kind of think it's a bad dream and we'll all wake up and it will all be gone. But it isn't going to be any time soon."

Still, Phillip said, seeing police rescue people like Catherine and Aiden Pham has been a reminder of his city's endurance.

 

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