FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2009 file photo, a radio transmitter is inserted into a little brown bat in an abandoned mine in Rosendale, N.Y. A 2018 survey of several cave-dwelling bat species in New Hampshire found very few spent their winters in abandoned mines and other locations that were once popular for them during the winter. Biologists said the numbers are the latest indication that the bats have yet to recover from a fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

Survey: Bats not choosing New Hampshire for the winter

April 28, 2018 - 10:58 am

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A new survey of several cave-dwelling bat species in New Hampshire found very few are spending their winters in abandoned mines and other locations once popular for them in winter.

The survey of four sites found only 26 bats and only one little brown bat, which was once the most common species in the Northeast.

Biologists say the numbers are the latest indication that the bats have yet to recover from a fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome. White-nose has been documented in about 31 states and five Canadian provinces since it first appeared in New York in 2006. The fungus thrives in caves and mines, growing on bats' wing membranes and noses while they hibernate.

Before white-nose hit New Hampshire in 2009, biologists found as many as 4,000 bats.

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