In this Sept. 4, 2019 photo, Sudanese activist Khalda Saber, poses for a photograph at her apartment, in Cairo, Egypt. Saber, a mother of two, was one of hundreds of thousands of Sudanese women who risked their lives leading protests that eventually pushed the military to overthrow al-Bashir in April. Under a joint military-civilian council in power now, they hope for more freedom and equality, and seek to overturn many of the restrictive Islamic laws from the previous era. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

In new Sudan, women want more freedom, bigger political role

September 19, 2019 - 3:09 am

CAIRO (AP) — Sudan's uprising has raised hopes for a new era for the nation and for Sudanese women after three decades of autocratic rule by Omar al-Bashir.

Sudanese women played a pivotal role in the protests that brought down al-Bashir, and under an interim government in power now, they hope for more freedom and equality.

Activists say they seek to overturn many of the restrictive Islamic laws from the previous era.

Khalda Saber is one such activist, but had to leave Sudan two days after al-Bashir's overthrow.

She was threatened for documenting rights abuses against women before and during the pro-democracy uprising.

Wifaq Gurashi, a women's rights activist in Khartoum, says: "It's a long way" to go "to get rid of the traditional way of thinking in this masculine and authoritarian society."

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