In this Jan. 9, 2017, photo, Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., left, and Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md. listen as President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. Bargainers seeking a bipartisan immigration accord planned talks as soon as Wednesday as President Donald Trump and leading lawmakers sought to parlay an extraordinary White House meeting into momentum for resolving a politically blistering issue.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The Latest: Trump calls court system 'broken and unfair'

January 10, 2018 - 9:59 am

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump, Congress and immigration (all times local):

9:45 a.m.

President Donald Trump says the U.S. court system is — in his words — "broken and unfair."

That's his reaction after a trial-level federal judge in California temporarily blocked the administration from ending a program that protects certain young immigrants from deportation.

The government could appeal that ruling to a San Francisco-based appeals court — where the administration's travel ban has run into legal problems.

In his latest tweet, Trump says "it just shows everyone how broken and unfair" the court system is when those opposed to his policies find they "almost always" win in that appeals court before eventually being reversed.

On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge William Alsup granted a request by California and other plaintiffs to prevent Trump from ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program while their lawsuits play out in court.

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8:49 a.m.

A White House spokeswoman says a judge's ruling against the Trump administration involving a program that protects young immigrants is "outrageous."

Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement Wednesday that the ruling was "outrageous, especially in light of the President's successful bipartisan meeting with House and Senate members at the White House on the same day."

Sanders said the issue should "go through the normal legislative process" and pledged President Donald Trump "will work with members of both parties to reach a permanent solution."

U.S. District Judge William Alsup on Tuesday granted a request by California and other plaintiffs to prevent Trump from ending the program while their lawsuits play out in court.

The Department of Justice has said federal government is acting within its authority to wind down the program.

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1 a.m.

Bargainers seeking a bipartisan immigration accord plan to resume talks quickly. Their desire for speed comes as President Donald Trump and lawmakers seek to parlay an extraordinary White House meeting into momentum for resolving a politically blistering issue.

Negotiators want to revive protections against deportation that Trump ended for nearly 800,000 immigrants who arrived illegally in the U.S. as children. In exchange, Trump and Republicans want toughened border protections and tightened restrictions on others trying to migrate to this country.

At a White House bargaining session Tuesday, Trump told nearly two dozen lawmakers that they were "not that far away from comprehensive immigration reform."

Adding pressure: Republicans need Democratic votes by Jan. 19 to prevent a federal shutdown. Democrats have threatened to withhold those votes without an immigration agreement.

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