FILE - In this Sept. 23, 1972 file photo, The Right Rev. Paul Moore Jr. arrives at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York to be installed as the 13th Episcopal bishop of New York. The Episcopal Church is acknowledging the power of the #MeToo movement by officially lamenting its past role in sexual exploitation. The church’s self-examination, which included a session at which first-person accounts of clergy abuse were read aloud by bishops, has been particularly dramatic in the Diocese of New York; it is now describing its most famous bishop, the late Paul Moore Jr., as a "serial predator." (AP Photo)

Episcopal Church confronts past role in sexual exploitation

October 15, 2018 - 5:37 am

NEW YORK (AP) — With striking displays of candor, the Episcopal Church is acknowledging the potency of the #MeToo movement by officially lamenting its past role in sexual exploitation and pledging steps to combat it.

The Protestant denomination's national convention this summer included an emotional session at which first-person accounts of abuse by clergy were read aloud by 12 bishops. Dioceses nationwide are now seeking to gather similar stories from victims in their local church communities.

That process of story sharing has been particularly dramatic in the Diocese of New York, where Bishop Andrew Dietsche recently released a blunt pastoral letter. It described the most famous of his predecessors, the late Paul Moore Jr., as a "serial predator" who engaged in "long-time patterns" of sexual exploitation.

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