In this Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, photo, Dr. Jasmine Saavedra, a pediatrician at Esperanza Health Centers whose parents emigrated from Mexico in the 1980s, examines Alondra Marquez, a newborn baby in her clinic in Chicago. Doctors and public health experts warn of poor health outcomes and rising costs they say will come from sweeping changes that would deny green cards to many immigrants who use Medicaid, as well as food stamps and other forms of public assistance. Saavedra is convinced that if new Trump administration criteria were in effect for her parents three decades ago, she wouldn’t have become a pediatrician. (AP Photo/Amr Alfiky)

Doctors warn of fallout from new immigration rule

August 17, 2019 - 10:39 am

CHICAGO (AP) — Doctors and public health experts warn of poor health outcomes and rising costs they say will come from sweeping changes that would deny green cards to many immigrants who use Medicaid, food stamps or other public assistance.

President Donald Trump's administration trumpeted its aggressive approach as a way to keep only self-sufficient immigrants in the country. Some advocates say they're already seeing the fallout even before the complex 837-page rule takes effect in October.

Health experts argue it could force millions of low-income migrants to choose between needed services and their bid to stay legally in the U.S. The result could be across-the-board poorer health outcomes.

Medical experts say there are signs it's already happening in cities including Chicago, Detroit and New York.

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