Small business

FILE - In this June 28, 2004, file photo, a customer looks over color chips at a Sherwin-Williams store in Columbus, Ohio. The nation's major suppliers of lead paint have agreed to pay California's largest cities and counties $305 million to settle a nearly two-decade old lawsuit. The settlement announced Wednesday, July 17, 2019, comes after years of legal and legislative battling in California and other states. The settlement is with the Sherwin-Williams Company, ConAgra Grocery Products Company and NL Industries, Inc. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
July 17, 2019 - 6:54 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The nation's former major suppliers of lead paint have agreed to pay California's largest cities and counties $305 million to settle a nearly 20-year-old lawsuit, attorneys said Wednesday. The settlement comes after years of legal and legislative battling in California and...
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FILE - In this June 28, 2004, file photo, a customer looks over color chips at a Sherwin-Williams store in Columbus, Ohio. The nation's major suppliers of lead paint have agreed to pay California's largest cities and counties $305 million to settle a nearly two-decade old lawsuit. The settlement announced Wednesday, July 17, 2019, comes after years of legal and legislative battling in California and other states. The settlement is with the Sherwin-Williams Company, ConAgra Grocery Products Company and NL Industries, Inc. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
July 17, 2019 - 5:45 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The nation's major suppliers of lead paint have agreed to pay California's largest cities and counties $305 million to settle a nearly 20-year-old lawsuit, attorneys said Wednesday. The settlement comes after years of legal and legislative battling in California and other...
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File - In this July 26, 2018, file photo, U.S. Deputy Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt waits to speak during the annual state of Colorado energy luncheon sponsored by the Colorado Petroleum council in Denver. The headquarters of the U.S. government's largest land agency will move from the nation's capital to western Colorado, a Republican senator said Monday, July 15, 2019, a high-profile component of the Trump administration's plan to reorganize management of the nation's natural resources. Rep. Raul M. Grijalva, D-Arizona, chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, attacked the headquarters move and noted that Grand Junction is not far from Interior Secretary David Bernhardt's hometown of Rifle, Colorado. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
July 16, 2019 - 7:56 pm
DENVER (AP) — The Trump administration said Tuesday that it can save taxpayers millions of dollars, make better decisions and trim a "top heavy" office in Washington by moving the headquarters of the nation's biggest land agency to Colorado and dispersing scores of jobs across 11 states in the U.S...
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FILE - In this June 19, 2019, file photo cargo containers are stacked on a ship at the Port of Los Angeles in Los Angeles. The market for small businesses cooled for the third straight quarter. That report comes from BizBuySell.com, an online marketplace for small companies that counted 2,444 transactions reported by business brokers from April through June, down 9.6% from 2,705 in the second quarter of last year. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
July 15, 2019 - 1:19 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The market for small businesses cooled for the third straight quarter during the spring as tariffs from the trade war with China made some sellers and buyers uneasy about making a deal. That report comes from BizBuySell.com, an online marketplace for small companies that counted 2,...
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In this May 10, 2019 photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Office of Spill Prevention and Response, oil flows at a Chevron oil field in Kern County, Calif. Nearly 800,000 gallons of oil and water has seeped from the ground since May. Chevron and California officials say the spill is not near any waterway and has not significantly affected wildlife. (California Deptartment of Fish and Wildlife's Office of Spill Prevention and Response via AP)
July 12, 2019 - 8:54 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Officials began to clean up a massive oil spill Friday that dumped nearly 800,000 gallons of oil and water into a California canyon, making it larger — if less devastating — than the state's last two major oil spills. The newly revealed spill has been flowing off and on...
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In this Monday, July 8, 2019 photo, Troy Young, a hemp grower in North Salt Lake, stops for breakfast at a nearby coffee shop before returning to his indoor grow facility. Young, who recently applied for a medical marijuana growers license in Utah, lost his mother to an opioid addiction. If she had access to less destructive pain-relieving drug, like marijuana, Young said maybe she'd still be alive. (AP Photo/Morgan Smith)
July 12, 2019 - 4:25 pm
NEPHI, Utah (AP) — The wide metal barn on the Utah alfalfa farm owned by Russell and Diane Jones will host their youngest son's wedding next month. By September, they hope the structure will be full of marijuana plants. The Joneses are fourth-generation farmers, members of The Church of Jesus...
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In this Monday, July 8, 2019 photo, Troy Young, a hemp grower in North Salt Lake, stops for breakfast at a nearby coffee shop before returning to his indoor grow facility. Young, who recently applied for a medical marijuana growers license in Utah, lost his mother to an opioid addiction. If she had access to less destructive pain-relieving drug, like marijuana, Young said maybe she'd still be alive. (AP Photo/Morgan Smith)
July 12, 2019 - 12:38 pm
NEPHI, Utah (AP) — The wide metal barn on the Utah alfalfa farm owned by Russell and Diane Jones will host their youngest son's wedding next month. By September, they hope the structure will be full of marijuana plants. The Joneses are fourth-generation farmers, members of The Church of Jesus...
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Assemblyman Chris Holden, D-Pasadena, center, shakes hands with Assemblyman Chad Mayes, R-Yucca Valley, after their wildfire measure they co-authored, along with Assemblywoman Autumn Burke, D-Inglewood was approved by the Assembly in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, July 11, 2019. The bill, AB1054, aimed at stabilizing the state's electric utilities in the face of devastating wildfires caused by their equipment, was approved overwhelmingly and now goes to the governor. At left is state Sen. Bill Dodd, D-Napa, who carried the measure in the Senate. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
July 11, 2019 - 6:50 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California lawmakers approved a multibillion-dollar plan Thursday to shore up the state's biggest electric utilities in the face of catastrophic wildfires and claims for damage from past blazes caused by their equipment. It requires major utilities to spend at least $5...
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FILE - In this July 8, 2019 file photo President Donald Trump listens as Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt speaks during an event on the environment in the East Room of the White House in Washington. A congressional committee is investigating whether the U.S. Interior Department helped an Arizona developer and supporter of President Donald Trump get a crucial permit. U.S. Rep. Raúl Grijalva is leading an investigation into the proposed 28,000-home development. Bernhardt had an unofficial meeting when he was deputy secretary with developer Mike Ingram, Arizona Diamondbacks co-owner and a prominent GOP donor. Interior officials deny politics played a part in the permit. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
July 10, 2019 - 7:20 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A congressional committee is investigating whether the U.S. Interior Department helped an Arizona developer and supporter of President Donald Trump get a crucial permit after a wildlife official said the housing project would threaten habitat for imperiled species. U.S. Rep. Raúl...
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FILE - In this July 8, 2019 file photo President Donald Trump listens as Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt speaks during an event on the environment in the East Room of the White House in Washington. A congressional committee is investigating whether the U.S. Interior Department helped an Arizona developer and supporter of President Donald Trump get a crucial permit. U.S. Rep. Raúl Grijalva is leading an investigation into the proposed 28,000-home development. Bernhardt had an unofficial meeting when he was deputy secretary with developer Mike Ingram, Arizona Diamondbacks co-owner and a prominent GOP donor. Interior officials deny politics played a part in the permit. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
July 10, 2019 - 6:19 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A congressional committee is investigating whether the U.S. Interior Department helped an Arizona developer and supporter of President Donald Trump get a crucial permit after a wildlife official said the housing project would threaten habitat for imperiled species. U.S. Rep. Raúl...
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