Science

June 03, 2019 - 11:53 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Dr. Patricia Bath, a pioneering ophthalmologist who became the first African American female doctor to receive a medical patent after she invented a more precise treatment of cataracts, has died. She was 76. Her daughter says Bath died from complications of cancer on May 30 at...
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FILE - This March 30, 2018 file photo shows a Proposition 65 warning sign behind a coffee mug at a Starbucks coffee shop in Burbank, Calif. California has officially concluded coffee does not pose a "significant" cancer risk. State regulators gave final approval Monday, June 3, 2019 to a rule that means coffee won't have to carry ominous warnings that the beverage may be bad for you. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)
June 03, 2019 - 9:10 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — California officially gave its blessing to coffee Monday, declaring the beverage does not pose a "significant" cancer risk. The rule, proposed a year ago by regulators, means coffee won't have to carry ominous warnings that the beverage may be bad for you. The state took the rare...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018 file photo, an embryo receives a small dose of Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA in a microscope in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province, during work by scientist He Jiankui's team. A report released on Monday, June 3, 2019, shows that people with a DNA mutation that reduces their chance of HIV infection have heightened overall death rate, warning that genetic tinkering can produce risks. Rasmus Nielsen of the University of California, Berkeley, senior author of the paper, acknowledged that his result cannot be applied directly to the two girls in China. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
June 03, 2019 - 11:02 am
NEW YORK (AP) — People with a DNA mutation that reduces their chance of HIV infection may die sooner, according to a study that suggests tinkering with a gene to try to fix one problem may cause others. The study authors cited the case of the Chinese researcher who tried to produce this mutation in...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018 file photo, a bird flies past as smoke emits from the chimneys of Serbia's main coal-fired power station near Kostolac, Serbia. People in all major cities across the Western Balkans face alarming levels of air pollution that are reducing resident’s life expectancies, as the underdeveloped, politically fragile region is still heavily reliant on burning coal to generate electricity and heat, the U.N. Environment Program said in a new report on Monday June 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, File)
June 03, 2019 - 7:19 am
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — People in all major cities across the western Balkans face alarming levels of air pollution that are reducing their life expectancies because the underdeveloped, politically fragile region is still heavily reliant on burning coal to generate power, the U.N. said...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018 file photo, a bird flies past as smoke emits from the chimneys of Serbia's main coal-fired power station near Kostolac, Serbia. People in all major cities across the Western Balkans face alarming levels of air pollution that are reducing resident’s life expectancies, as the underdeveloped, politically fragile region is still heavily reliant on burning coal to generate electricity and heat, the U.N. Environment Program said in a new report on Monday June 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, File)
June 03, 2019 - 7:04 am
SARAVEJO, Bosnia (AP) — The U.N. says people in all major cities across the Western Balkans face alarming levels of air pollution that are reducing their life expectancies because the underdeveloped, politically fragile region is still heavily reliant on burning coal to generate power. The report...
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June 02, 2019 - 1:24 pm
BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — A few thousand mostly academics and students held a protest march against a plan by Prime Minister Viktor Orban's government to seize control of the research network of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Critics say the government plan threatens academic freedom and...
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FILE - This Saturday, May 25, 2019, file photo provided by Cache County Sheriff's Office shows Alex Whipple. Police were able to quickly connect Whipple to the disappearance and death of a 5-year-old Utah girl using a new type of DNA test that can produce results within hours, authorities said. Logan police used a Rapid DNA test to link Alex Whipple to the Saturday disappearance of his niece, Elizabeth "Lizzy" Shelley, KSL-TV reported .(Cache County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
May 31, 2019 - 9:41 pm
LOGAN, Utah (AP) — Police were able to quickly connect a man to the disappearance and death of a 5-year-old Utah girl using a new type of DNA test that can produce results within hours, authorities said. Logan police used a Rapid DNA test to link Alex Whipple to the Saturday disappearance of his...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2004, file photo, a gray wolf is seen at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minn. Government officials say they are reviewing a report from a scientific panel that faulted plans to lift protections for the animals (AP Photo/Dawn Villella, File)
May 31, 2019 - 8:20 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Scientists tasked with reviewing government plans to lift protections for gray wolves across most of the U.S. said in a report released Friday that the proposal has numerous factual errors and other problems. The five-member scientific panel's conclusions were detailed in a...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2004, file photo, a gray wolf is seen at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minn. Government officials say they are reviewing a report from a scientific panel that faulted plans to lift protections for the animals (AP Photo/Dawn Villella, File)
May 31, 2019 - 7:56 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Scientists tasked with reviewing government plans to lift protections for gray wolves across most of the U.S. said in a report released Friday that the proposal has numerous factual errors and other problems. The five-member scientific panel's conclusions were detailed in a...
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In this May 24, 2019 photo, teachers and students from Northwest Montessori School in Seattle examine the carcass of a gray whale after it washed up on the coast of Washington's Olympic Peninsula, just north of Kalaloch Campground in Olympic National Park. Federal scientists on Friday, May 31 opened an investigation into what is causing a spike in gray whale deaths along the West Coast this year. So far, about 70 whales have stranded on the coasts of Washington, Oregon, Alaska and California, the most since 2000. (AP Photo/Gene Johnson)
May 31, 2019 - 7:50 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — U.S. scientists said Friday they will investigate why an unusual number of gray whales are washing up dead on West Coast beaches. About 70 whales have been found dead so far this year on the coasts of California, Oregon, Washington and Alaska, the most since 2000. About five more...
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