Science

FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2011 file photo visitors view the dramatic bend in the Colorado River at the popular Horseshoe Bend in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, in Page, Ariz. Some 40 million people in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming draw from the Colorado River and its tributaries. Much of that originates as snow. A wet winter likely will fend off mandated water shortages for states in the U.S. West that rely on the river but won't erase the impact of climate change. Climate change means the region is still getting drier and hotter. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:56 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2014 file photo, what was once a marina sits high and dry due to Lake Mead receding in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Extreme swings in weather are expected as part of a changing climate, something Brad Udall, a water and climate research scientist at Colorado State University, has called "weather whiplash." The drought-stricken Southwest got a reprieve this year with average and above-average snowfall following a year that sent many states into extreme drought. Nearly empty reservoirs quickly rose, including Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the largest man-made reservoirs in the country that hold back Colorado River water. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:53 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
Read More
FILE - In this July 16, 2014 file photo, what was once a marina sits high and dry due to Lake Mead receding in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Extreme swings in weather are expected as part of a changing climate, something Brad Udall, a water and climate research scientist at Colorado State University, has called "weather whiplash." The drought-stricken Southwest got a reprieve this year with average and above-average snowfall following a year that sent many states into extreme drought. Nearly empty reservoirs quickly rose, including Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the largest man-made reservoirs in the country that hold back Colorado River water. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:43 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
Read More
FILE - In this July 16, 2014 file photo, what was once a marina sits high and dry due to Lake Mead receding in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Extreme swings in weather are expected as part of a changing climate, something Brad Udall, a water and climate research scientist at Colorado State University, has called "weather whiplash." The drought-stricken Southwest got a reprieve this year with average and above-average snowfall following a year that sent many states into extreme drought. Nearly empty reservoirs quickly rose, including Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the largest man-made reservoirs in the country that hold back Colorado River water. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:14 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
Read More
FILE - In this July 16, 2014 file photo, what was once a marina sits high and dry due to Lake Mead receding in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Extreme swings in weather are expected as part of a changing climate, something Brad Udall, a water and climate research scientist at Colorado State University, has called "weather whiplash." The drought-stricken Southwest got a reprieve this year with average and above-average snowfall following a year that sent many states into extreme drought. Nearly empty reservoirs quickly rose, including Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the largest man-made reservoirs in the country that hold back Colorado River water. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:13 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, likely fending off mandated water shortages next year for states that rely on the Colorado River. Although snow and rain swelled rivers and streams, that doesn't mean conditions are improving long term. Climate change...
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FILE - In this Oct. 17, 2011 file photo, guests stand outside the new Spaceport America hangar in Upham, N.M. Virgin Galactic is scheduled to unveil the interior of its digs at Spaceport America, providing the first glimpse of mission control, a prep area for pilots and where paying customers will lounge ahead of their suborbital flights. Company officials are gathering Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, at the remote facility in the New Mexico desert to show off two levels of the custom-tailored hangar at the taxpayer-financed spaceport. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:10 am
UPHAM, N.M. (AP) — Spaceport America is no longer just a shiny shell of hope that space tourism would one day launch from this remote spot in the New Mexico desert. The once-empty hangar that anchors the taxpayer-financed launch and landing facility has been transformed into a custom-tailored...
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FILE - In this Oct. 17, 2011 file photo, guests stand outside the new Spaceport America hangar in Upham, N.M. Virgin Galactic is scheduled to unveil the interior of its digs at Spaceport America, providing the first glimpse of mission control, a prep area for pilots and where paying customers will lounge ahead of their suborbital flights. Company officials are gathering Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, at the remote facility in the New Mexico desert to show off two levels of the custom-tailored hangar at the taxpayer-financed spaceport. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:05 am
UPHAM, N.M. (AP) — Virgin Galactic plans to unveil its digs at Spaceport America, providing the first glimpse of mission control, a prep area for pilots and a lounge where paying customers will wait for their flights to space. Company officials are gathering Thursday at the remote facility in the...
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This undated photo provided by the 'Helmholtz centre for polar and marine research the Alfred Wegener institute' shows snow samples from Tschuggen, Switzerland, locked and ready for transport to Davos. Scientists of the institute say they proved plastic in the snow of the Alps and the Arctic. (Juerg Trachsel/WSL-Institut für Schnee- und Lawinenforschung SLF via AP)
August 14, 2019 - 2:50 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they've found an abundance of tiny plastic particles in Arctic snow, indicating that so-called microplastics are being sucked into the atmosphere and carried long distances to some of the remotest corners of the planet. The researchers examined snow collected from sites...
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This undated photo provided by the 'Helmholtz centre for polar and marine research the Alfred Wegener institute' shows snow samples from Tschuggen, Switzerland, locked and ready for transport to Davos. Scientists of the institute say they proved plastic in the snow of the Alps and the Arctic. (Juerg Trachsel/WSL-Institut für Schnee- und Lawinenforschung SLF via AP)
August 14, 2019 - 2:44 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they've found an abundance of tiny plastic particles in Arctic snow, indicating that so-called microplastics are being sucked into the atmosphere and carried long distances to some of the remotest corners of the planet. The researchers examined snow collected from sites...
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August 14, 2019 - 2:03 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say tiny bits of plastic are being sucked into the atmosphere and carried thousands of miles to some of the remotest corners of the planet. Researchers from Germany and Switzerland said in a study published on Wednesday they've found evidence of so-called microplastics...
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