Science

In this image made from a Feb. 1, 2019, video, Robert Kwiatkowski, a graduate student at Columbia University, demonstrates a robotic arm picking up a red ball and dropping it in a cup at the school in New York. Columbia University engineers have given a robot the ability to model itself without prior knowledge of physics or its own shape. It’s learned that it’s a robotic arm using a process of self-simulation. (AP Photo)
February 04, 2019 - 5:59 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Forget dreaming of electric sheep. Robots first need to figure out how to imagine themselves. One New York robot has done just that. It's learned that it's a robotic arm using a process of self-simulation. Columbia University engineers have given the robot the ability to model...
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FILE- In this July 23, 2017, file photo the midnight sun shines across sea ice along the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The magnetic north pole is wandering about 34 miles (55 kilometers) a year. At the end of 2017 it crossed the international date line. That means it’s not even the same day at the new magnetic north pole as it is at the spot of 2010’s magnetic north pole. It’s leaving the Canadian Arctic on its way to Siberia. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
February 04, 2019 - 5:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — North isn't quite where it used to be. Earth's north magnetic pole has been drifting so fast in the last few decades that scientists say that past estimates are no longer accurate enough for precise navigation. On Monday, they released an update of where magnetic north really was...
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FILE- In this July 23, 2017, file photo the midnight sun shines across sea ice along the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The magnetic north pole is wandering about 34 miles (55 kilometers) a year. At the end of 2017 it crossed the international date line. That means it’s not even the same day at the new magnetic north pole as it is at the spot of 2010’s magnetic north pole. It’s leaving the Canadian Arctic on its way to Siberia. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
February 04, 2019 - 4:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — True north isn't quite where it used to be. Earth's north magnetic pole has been drifting so fast in the last few decades that scientists that past estimates are no longer accurate enough for precise navigation. On Monday, they released an update of where true north really was,...
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FILE- In this July 23, 2017, file photo the midnight sun shines across sea ice along the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The magnetic north pole is wandering about 34 miles (55 kilometers) a year. At the end of 2017 it crossed the international date line. That means it’s not even the same day at the new magnetic north pole as it is at the spot of 2010’s magnetic north pole. It’s leaving the Canadian Arctic on its way to Siberia. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
February 04, 2019 - 3:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — True north isn't quite where it used to be. The magnetic north pole has been moving so fast that scientists on Monday released an update of where true north really was, nearly a year ahead of schedule. Earth's north magnetic pole is wandering about 34 miles (55 kilometers) a year...
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February 01, 2019 - 9:46 pm
HAVANA (AP) — Residents and tourists in a town in western Cuba saw a flare pass through the sky and heard an explosion Friday in what officials said was a meteorite strike. Witnesses reported seeing a ball of fire and a smoke trail in a clear midday sky, and a rain of black stones fell on the...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo, animal conservation activists hold pictures of elephants being killed for their ivory tusks, outside the Legislative Council in Hong Kong. Hong Kong customs officers have intercepted a record 8.3 tons of pangolin scales and hundreds of elephant tusks worth more than $8 million combined, underscoring the threat to endangered species from demand in Asia. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File)
February 01, 2019 - 8:49 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong customs officers have intercepted a record 8.3 tons of pangolin scales and hundreds of elephant tusks worth more than $8 million combined, underscoring the threat to endangered species from demand in Asia. Acting on a tip from mainland Chinese authorities, local officials...
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Elephant seals and their pups occupy Drakes Beach, Friday, Feb. 1, 2019, in Point Reyes National Seashore, Calif. Tourists unable to visit a popular beach in Northern California that was taken over by a colony of nursing elephant seals during the government shutdown will be able to get an up-close view of the creatures, officials said Friday. Rangers and volunteer docents will lead small groups of visitors starting Saturday to the edge of a parking lot so they can safely see the elephant seals and their newborn pups, said park spokesman John Dell'Osso. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
February 01, 2019 - 8:19 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — National park visitors cut new trails in sensitive soil. They pried open gates while no one was watching. They found bathrooms locked, so they went outside. One off-roader even mowed down an iconic twisted-limbed Joshua tree in California. During the 35-day government shutdown...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2014 file photo, what was once a marina sits high and dry due to Lake Mead receding in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Arizona is nearing a deadline to approve a plan to ensure a key reservoir in the West doesn't become unusable as a water source for farmers, cities, tribes and developers. Other Western states are watching. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation expects full agreement on a drought contingency plan by Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
February 01, 2019 - 7:24 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Two states in the U.S. West have work to do on a plan to combat the shrinking supply of Colorado River water that 40 million people depend on but that's threatened by a prolonged drought, a federal official said Friday. Complex agreements among water users in California and...
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Elephant seals and their pups occupy Drakes Beach, Friday, Feb. 1, 2019, in Point Reyes National Seashore, Calif. Tourists unable to visit a popular beach in Northern California that was taken over by a colony of nursing elephant seals during the government shutdown will be able to get an up-close view of the creatures, officials said Friday. Rangers and volunteer docents will lead small groups of visitors starting Saturday to the edge of a parking lot so they can safely see the elephant seals and their newborn pups, said park spokesman John Dell'Osso. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
February 01, 2019 - 6:44 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — National park visitors cut new trails in sensitive soil. They pried open gates while no one was watching. They found bathrooms locked, so they went outside. One off-roader even mowed down an iconic twisted-limbed Joshua tree in California. During the 35-day government shutdown...
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February 01, 2019 - 6:26 pm
HAVANA (AP) — Residents and tourists in a town in western Cuba saw a flare pass through the sky and heard an explosion Friday in what state media and scientists say was likely a meteorite. Witnesses reported seeing a ball of fire and a smoke trail in a clear midday sky, and a rain of small black...
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