Science

FILE - This Oct. 29, 2015, file photo shows signs warning of a shark sighting, which was posted at Makaha Beach Park in Waianae, Hawaii. University of Florida researchers say far fewer shark bites were reported worldwide last year. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy, File)
January 28, 2019 - 4:12 pm
GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — University of Florida researchers say far fewer shark bites were reported worldwide last year. According to the university's International Shark Attack File, 66 bites were documented in 2018, compared with 88 the previous year. That's 26 percent lower than the five-year...
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FILE - In this July 19, 2007 file photo, Nobel Prize-winning scientist Craig Mello, front, acknowledges applause from members of the Massachusetts House and Senate on the floor of the House Chamber at the Statehouse in Boston. Emails obtained by The Associated Press show Chinese scientist He Jiankui told Mello about the gene-edited babies in April 2018, months before the claim became public. Mello objected to the experiment and remained an adviser to He's biotech company for eight more months before resigning. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
January 28, 2019 - 4:04 pm
Long before the claim of the world's first gene-edited babies became public, Chinese researcher He Jiankui shared the news with a U.S. Nobel laureate who objected to the experiment yet remained an adviser to He's biotech company. The revelation that another prominent scientist knew of the work,...
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People walk through a snowstorm in downtown Jackson, Mich., Monday, Jan. 28, 2019. (J. Scott Park/Jackson Citizen Patriot via AP)
January 28, 2019 - 3:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — It might seem counterintuitive, but the dreaded polar vortex is bringing its icy grip to the Midwest thanks to a sudden blast of warm air in the Arctic. Get used to it. The polar vortex has been wandering more often in recent years. It all started with misplaced Moroccan heat...
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FILE - This May 31, 2018 file photo shows the reduced water level of Lake Mead behind Hoover Dam in Arizona. Arizona is nearing a deadline to approve a plan to ensure a key reservoir in the West doesn't become unusable as a water source for farmers, cities, tribes and developers. Other Western states are watching. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation expects full agreement on a drought contingency plan by Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
January 28, 2019 - 3:06 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Arizona is facing a deadline to become the last of several states in the U.S. West to approve a plan ensuring shared water from the Colorado River doesn't dry up for millions of farmers, cities, tribes and developers that depend on it. The other six states have agreed to...
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January 28, 2019 - 1:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story Jan. 22 looking at public views on the impact of climate change, The Associated Press erroneously reported the name of the group where climate scientist Heidi Roop works as the Climate Impact Group at the University of Washington. The correct name is the Climate Impacts...
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FILE - In this July 19, 2007 file photo, Nobel Prize-winning scientist Craig Mello, front, acknowledges applause from members of the Massachusetts House and Senate on the floor of the House Chamber at the Statehouse in Boston. Emails obtained by The Associated Press show Chinese scientist He Jiankui told Mello about the gene-edited babies in April 2018, months before the claim became public. Mello objected to the experiment and remained an adviser to He's biotech company for eight more months before resigning. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
January 28, 2019 - 12:06 pm
Long before the claim of the world's first gene-edited babies became public, Chinese researcher He Jiankui shared the news with a U.S. Nobel laureate who objected to the experiment yet remained an adviser to He's biotech company. The revelation that another prominent scientist knew of the work,...
Read More
FILE - In this July 19, 2007 file photo, Nobel Prize-winning scientist Craig Mello, front, acknowledges applause from members of the Massachusetts House and Senate on the floor of the House Chamber at the Statehouse in Boston. Emails obtained by The Associated Press show Chinese scientist He Jiankui told Mello about the gene-edited babies in April 2018, months before the claim became public. Mello objected to the experiment and remained an adviser to He's biotech company for eight more months before resigning. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
January 28, 2019 - 12:05 pm
Emails show the Chinese researcher behind the claim of gene-edited babies told a U.S. Nobel laureate about the experiment months before the news became public. The revelation comes as scientists debate whether and how to alert troubling research, and the need for clearer guidelines. Several U.S...
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Toshiba Corp.'s energy systems unit group manager Jun Suzuki shows a remote-controlled melted fuel probe device at its facility in Yokohama, near Tokyo, Monday, Jan. 28, 2019. Toshiba unveiled the device carrying tongs that comes out of a long telescopic pipe for an internal probe in one of three damaged reactor chambers at Japan’s tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear plant - this time to touch chunks of melted fuel. (AP Photo/Mari Yamaguchi)
January 28, 2019 - 7:51 am
YOKOHAMA, Japan (AP) — Toshiba Corp. has unveiled a remote-controlled robot with tongs that it hopes will be able to probe the inside of one of the three damaged reactors at Japan's tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear plant and manipulate chunks of melted fuel. The device displayed Monday is designed to...
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FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2017 file photo, Haider, left, and Abdullah carry belongings they collected from their damaged house to wash before returning to live in the Old City of Mosul, Iraq. For centuries, residents of Mosul have spoken a unique form of Arabic enriched by the Iraqi city’s long history as a crossroads of civilization, a singsong dialect that many now fear will die out after years of war and displacement. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
January 28, 2019 - 1:10 am
MOSUL, Iraq (AP) — Residents of Mosul have for centuries spoken a unique form of Arabic enriched by the Iraqi city's long history as a crossroads of civilization. It's a singsong dialect that many now fear will die out after years of war and displacement. Much of Mosul's Old City, where speakers of...
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FILE - This Sept. 6, 2012, file photo, shows the Amazon logo. A new study says Amazon’s facial-detection technology often misidentifies women, particularly those with darker skin. The researchers from MIT and the University of Toronto say they studied Amazon’s technology because it has marketed it to law enforcement. Privacy and civil rights advocates say Amazon should not do so because of worries about discrimination against minorities. Amazon says the study uses a “facial analysis” and not “facial recognition” technology and that Amazon has updated its technology since the study. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)
January 25, 2019 - 4:23 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Facial-detection technology that Amazon is marketing to law enforcement often misidentifies women, particularly those with darker skin, according to researchers from MIT and the University of Toronto. Privacy and civil rights advocates have called on Amazon to stop marketing its...
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