Science

In this Oct. 9, 2018 photo, an embryologist adjusts a microplate containing embryos that were injected with gene-editing components in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Most Americans say it would be OK to change the DNA of babies before they're born to protect them from a variety of diseases _ but a December 2018 poll shows they'd draw the line at gene editing to create children who are smarter, faster or taller. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 29, 2018 - 12:24 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say it would be OK to use gene-editing technology to create babies protected against a variety of diseases — but a new poll finds they'd draw the line at changing DNA so children are born smarter, faster or taller. A month after startling claims of the births of the...
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FILE - In this July 27, 2018, file photo, the Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo. The Trump administration on Friday targeted an Obama-era regulation credited with helping dramatically reduce toxic mercury pollution from coal-fired power plants, saying the benefits to human health and the environment may not be worth the cost of the regulation. The 2011 Obama administration rule, called the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, led to what electric utilities say was an $18 billion clean-up of mercury and other toxins from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)
December 29, 2018 - 12:21 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration has targeted an Obama-era regulation credited with helping dramatically reduce toxic mercury pollution from coal-fired power plants, saying the benefits to human health and the environment may not be worth the cost of the regulation. The 2011 Obama...
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FILE - In this July 27, 2018, file photo, the Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo. The Trump administration on Friday targeted an Obama-era regulation credited with helping dramatically reduce toxic mercury pollution from coal-fired power plants, saying the benefits to human health and the environment may not be worth the cost of the regulation. The 2011 Obama administration rule, called the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, led to what electric utilities say was an $18 billion clean-up of mercury and other toxins from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)
December 28, 2018 - 5:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Friday targeted an Obama-era regulation credited with helping dramatically reduce toxic mercury pollution from coal-fired power plants, saying the benefits to human health and the environment may not be worth the cost of the regulation. The 2011 Obama...
Read More
In this Oct. 9, 2018 photo, an embryologist adjusts a microplate containing embryos that were injected with gene-editing components in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Most Americans say it would be OK to change the DNA of babies before they're born to protect them from a variety of diseases _ but a December 2018 poll shows they'd draw the line at gene editing to create children who are smarter, faster or taller. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 28, 2018 - 8:18 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say it would be OK to use gene-editing technology to create babies protected against a variety of diseases — but a new poll shows they'd draw the line at changing DNA so children are born smarter, faster or taller. A month after startling claims of the births of the...
Read More
In this Oct. 9, 2018 photo, an embryologist adjusts a microplate containing embryos that were injected with gene-editing components in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Most Americans say it would be OK to change the DNA of babies before they're born to protect them from a variety of diseases _ but a December 2018 poll shows they'd draw the line at gene editing to create children who are smarter, faster or taller. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 28, 2018 - 8:04 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say it would be OK to use gene-editing technology to create babies protected against a variety of diseases — but a new poll shows they'd draw the line at changing DNA so children are born smarter, faster or taller. A month after startling claims of the births of the...
Read More
In this Oct. 9, 2018 photo, an embryologist adjusts a microplate containing embryos that were injected with gene-editing components in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Most Americans say it would be OK to change the DNA of babies before they're born to protect them from a variety of diseases _ but a December 2018 poll shows they'd draw the line at gene editing to create children who are smarter, faster or taller. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 28, 2018 - 8:03 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new poll finds most Americans support using gene-editing technology to create babies protected against a variety of diseases — but not to make children smarter, faster or taller. Friday's release of the poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research comes a...
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Soldiers remove debris from a damaged house in the tsunami-hit village of Carita, Indonesia, Friday, Dec. 28, 2018. Indonesia has widened the no-go zone around an island volcano that triggered a tsunami on the weekend, killing hundreds of people in Sumatra and Java. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
December 28, 2018 - 7:49 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Bad weather and a massive ash column hampered efforts to assess whether Indonesia's Anak Krakatau volcano island could trigger another deadly tsunami as authorities said Friday the search for victims in the worst-affected province will continue into January. Indonesia's...
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Soldiers remove debris from a damaged house in the tsunami-hit village of Carita, Indonesia, Friday, Dec. 28, 2018. Indonesia has widened the no-go zone around an island volcano that triggered a tsunami on the weekend, killing hundreds of people in Sumatra and Java. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
December 28, 2018 - 4:24 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Bad weather and a massive ash column hampered efforts to assess whether Indonesia's Anak Krakatau volcano island could trigger another deadly tsunami as authorities said Friday the search for victims in the worst-affected province will continue into January. Indonesia's...
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Soldiers remove debris from a damaged house in the tsunami-hit village of Carita, Indonesia, Friday, Dec. 28, 2018. Indonesia has widened the no-go zone around an island volcano that triggered a tsunami on the weekend, killing hundreds of people in Sumatra and Java. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
December 28, 2018 - 3:42 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Bad weather hampered efforts to assess whether Indonesia's Anak Krakatau volcano island could trigger another deadly tsunami as authorities said the search for victims in the worst-affected province will continue into January. Indonesia's disaster agency said Friday that...
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An official looks a seismograph at an observation post near a recent volcanic eruption in Carita, Indonesia, Thursday, Dec. 27, 2018. Indonesia has widened the no-go zone around an island volcano that triggered a tsunami on the weekend, killing hundreds of people in Sumatra and Java. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
December 27, 2018 - 7:30 pm
CARITA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesia raised the danger level for an island volcano that triggered a tsunami on the weekend, killing at least 430 people in Sumatra and Java, and widened its no-go zone. The country's volcanology agency on Thursday increased the Anak Krakatau volcano's alert status to...
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