Science

June 20, 2019 - 9:58 am
HELSINKI (AP) — Estonian authorities say a wolf that captured international attention earlier this year after being rescued from an icy Estonian river by construction workers may have been killed. The Environment Agency told local broadcaster ERR late Wednesday the wolf's GPS tracking collar hasn't...
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FILE - In this image provided by NASA, astronaut Buzz Aldrin poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969. A new poll shows most Americans prefer focusing on potential asteroid impacts over a return to the moon. The survey by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research was released Thursday, June 20, one month before the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong and Aldrin’s momentous lunar landing. (Neil A. Armstrong/NASA via AP)
June 20, 2019 - 8:47 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Americans prefer a space program that focuses on potential asteroid impacts, scientific research and using robots to explore the cosmos over sending humans back to the moon or on to Mars, a poll shows. The poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public...
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FILE - In this image provided by NASA, astronaut Buzz Aldrin poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969. A new poll shows most Americans prefer focusing on potential asteroid impacts over a return to the moon. The survey by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research was released Thursday, June 20, one month before the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong and Aldrin’s momentous lunar landing. (Neil A. Armstrong/NASA via AP)
June 20, 2019 - 7:45 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Americans prefer a space program that focuses on potential asteroid impacts, scientific research and using robots to explore the cosmos over sending humans back to the moon or on to Mars, a poll shows. The poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2019, file photo, Regina Wells, foreground right, a forensic laboratories supervisor with the Kentucky State Police, demonstrates new crime-fighting technology in Frankfort, Ky. Rapid DNA machines roughly the size of an office printer have helped solve rape cases in Kentucky. Now a state board in Texas has asked a growing government provider of the DNA equipment used in those high-profile projects to halt work amid concerns of potentially jeopardized criminal cases, according to a letter obtained by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, File)
June 20, 2019 - 7:32 am
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — With a name that sounds like futuristic fiction, Rapid DNA machines roughly the size of an office printer have helped solve rape cases in Kentucky, identified California wildfire victims and verified family connections of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border. Now a state board in...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin gestures while speaking during his annual call-in show in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, June 20, 2019. Putin hosts call-in shows every year, which typically provide a platform for ordinary Russians to appeal to the president on issues ranging from foreign policy to housing and utilities. (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
June 20, 2019 - 7:30 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian officials have launched an operation to release nearly 100 illegally captured whales whose confinement in Russia's far east has become a rallying cry for environmentalists. A state TV reporter made the announcement during President Vladimir Putin's live Q&A show on...
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FILE - In this image provided by NASA, astronaut Buzz Aldrin poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969. A new poll shows most Americans prefer focusing on potential asteroid impacts over a return to the moon. The survey by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research was released Thursday, June 20, one month before the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong and Aldrin’s momentous lunar landing. (Neil A. Armstrong/NASA via AP)
June 20, 2019 - 5:44 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Americans prefer a space program that focuses on potential asteroid impacts, scientific research and using robots to explore the cosmos over sending humans back to the moon or on to Mars, a poll shows. The poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public...
Read More
FILE - In this image provided by NASA, astronaut Buzz Aldrin poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969. A new poll shows most Americans prefer focusing on potential asteroid impacts over a return to the moon. The survey by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research was released Thursday, June 20, one month before the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong and Aldrin’s momentous lunar landing. (Neil A. Armstrong/NASA via AP)
June 20, 2019 - 4:07 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Americans prefer a space program that focuses on potential asteroid impacts, scientific research and using robots to explore the cosmos over sending humans back to the moon or on to Mars, a new poll shows. The poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public...
Read More
FILE - In this April 10, 2019, file photo, Regina Wells, foreground right, a forensic laboratories supervisor with the Kentucky State Police, demonstrates new crime-fighting technology in Frankfort, Ky. Rapid DNA machines roughly the size of an office printer have helped solve rape cases in Kentucky. Now a state board in Texas has asked a growing government provider of the DNA equipment used in those high-profile projects to halt work amid concerns of potentially jeopardized criminal cases, according to a letter obtained by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, File)
June 20, 2019 - 1:22 am
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — With a name that sounds like futuristic fiction, Rapid DNA machines roughly the size of an office printer have helped solve rape cases in Kentucky, identified California wildfire victims and verified family connections of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border. Now a state board in...
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FILE -- In this April 24, 2019 file photo State Sen. Dr. Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, urges lawmakers to approve his proposal to give state public health officials instead of local doctors the power to decide which children can skip their shots before attending school, at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. A new version of Pan's bill, which would require public health officials tp scrutinize doctors who grant a high number of exemptions rather than review every exemption, will be will be taken up by the Assembly Health Committee, Thursday, June 20, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File )
June 20, 2019 - 1:11 am
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Residents are getting their first chance to weigh in on changes to a California measure that would give state public health officials oversight of doctors who grant a high number of medical exemptions for vaccinations and schools with vaccination rates less than 95%. The...
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FILE -- In this April 24, 2019 file photo State Sen. Dr. Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, urges lawmakers to approve his proposal to give state public health officials instead of local doctors the power to decide which children can skip their shots before attending school, at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. A new version of Pan's bill, which would require public health officials tp scrutinize doctors who grant a high number of exemptions rather than review every exemption, will be will be taken up by the Assembly Health Committee, Thursday, June 20, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File )
June 20, 2019 - 1:10 am
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Residents are getting their first chance to weigh in on a revised California measure giving state public health officials oversight of doctors who grant over five vaccination medical exemptions annually vaccinations and schools with vaccination rates less than 95%...
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