Science

FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2018, file photo, fishing trawlers sit on the frozen harbor of Lake Montauk surrounded by thin sheets of ice in Montauk, N.Y. A quick study of the brutal American cold snap found that the Arctic blast really was a freak of nature. Climate change wasn’t a factor but it is making such frigid weather spells much rarer. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)
January 11, 2018 - 9:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A quick study of the brutal American cold snap finds that the Arctic blast really wasn't global warming but a freak of nature. A team of international scientists who studies extreme weather calculate that the recent cold spell that began around Christmas is 15 times rarer than it...
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January 11, 2018 - 9:04 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A quick study of the brutal American cold snap finds that the Arctic blast really wasn't global warming but a freak of nature. A team of international scientists who studies extreme weather calculate that the recent cold spell that began around Christmas is 15 times rarer than it...
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January 11, 2018 - 6:52 am
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say millions more people around the world are threatened by river floods in coming decades due to climate change. Researchers in Germany say greater flood defenses are particularly needed in the United States, parts of India and Africa, Indonesia and Central Europe. River...
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In this Dec. 13, 2017 photo, a female barred owl sits on a branch in the wooded hills outside Philomath, Ore. A federal appeals court in San Francisco has upheld a plan by wildlife officials to kill one type of owl to study its effect on another type of owl. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
January 10, 2018 - 8:51 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal appeals court in San Francisco has upheld a plan by wildlife officials to kill one type of owl to study its effect on another type of owl. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said Wednesday that the experiment by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service didn't violate a...
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This undated handout picture released Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 by the company Ocean Infinity shows the vessel 'Seabed Constructor' which has been dispatched to the southern Indian Ocean to search for the wreckage of the missing plane, MH370. Malaysia's government said Wednesday it will pay U.S. company Ocean Infinity up to $70 million if it can find the wreckage or black boxes of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 within three months, in a renewed bid to solve the plane's disappearance nearly four years ago. (Ocean Infinity via AP)
January 10, 2018 - 8:08 pm
PUTRAJAYA, Malaysia (AP) — Malaysia's government said Wednesday it will pay U.S. company Ocean Infinity up to $70 million if it can find the wreckage or black boxes of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 within three months, in a renewed bid to solve the plane's disappearance nearly four years ago...
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FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2016 file photo, a man watches a BP refinery in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. New York City officials say they will begin the process of dumping about $5 billion in pension fund investments in fossil fuel companies, including BP, because of environmental concerns. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
January 10, 2018 - 3:07 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — New York City is taking on the oil industry on two fronts, announcing a lawsuit Wednesday that blames the top five oil companies for contributing to global warming and saying the city will sell off billions in fossil fuel investments from the city's pension funds. Democratic Mayor...
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In this 2014 photo provided by Joshua Daskin, a hippopotamus charges into the waters of Lake Urema, in Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique. Although some animals are killed in the crossfire or by mines, war primarily changes social and economic conditions in a way that make it tough on animals, said study co-author Rob Pringle, an ecologist at Princeton University. Gorongosa's hippos and other wildlife were devastated by civil war in the 1980s and 90s, but have recovered dramatically over the past decade thanks to a pioneering effort by the Mozambican Government to enlist conservationists, scientists, and local communities in ecological restoration. (Joshua Daskin via AP)
January 10, 2018 - 1:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — War is hell for wildlife, too. A new study finds that wartime is the biggest threat to Africa's elephants, rhinos, hippos and other large animals. The researchers analyzed how decades of conflict in Africa have affected populations of large animals. More than 70 percent of Africa'...
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FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2016 file photo, a man watches a BP refinery in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. New York City officials say they will begin the process of dumping about $5 billion in pension fund investments in fossil fuel companies, including BP, because of environmental concerns. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
January 10, 2018 - 12:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — New York City sued five major oil companies, claiming they have contributed to global warming, on the same day officials announced they will sell off billions in fossil fuel investments from the city's pension funds. Mayor Bill de Blasio said the city would be seeking billions of...
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This Dec. 8, 2017, photo provided by the National Aviary shows a female Linnaeus' two-toed sloth born Aug. 21, 2017, named Vivien after "Gone with the Wind" actress Vivien Leigh and hand-raised to serve as an educational ambassador for the National Aviary in Pittsburgh. Caretakers at Pittsburgh's indoor zoo dedicated to birds began displaying the baby sloth for National Aviary visitors on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, with public appearances scheduled during a regular feeding time at 12:30 p.m. daily. (Jamie Greene/National Aviary for AP)
January 10, 2018 - 9:09 am
PITTSBURGH (AP) — Pittsburgh's indoor zoo dedicated to birds has an adorable new member: a baby two-toed sloth. The National Aviary introduced 5-month-old Vivien Leigh on Tuesday. The aviary says Vivien was acquired from a breeder in Florida. The sloth will be hand-raised by experts so it will be...
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Director General of Civil Aviation Malaysia, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, left, shakes hand and exchanges the Memorandum of Understanding documents with CEO of Ocean Infinity Limited, Oliver Plunkett, right, during the signing ceremony of the MH370 missing plane search operations between Malaysian government and Ocean Infinity Limited in Putrajaya, Malaysia, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Sadiq Asyraf)
January 10, 2018 - 7:17 am
PUTRAJAYA, Malaysia (AP) — Malaysia's government said Wednesday it will pay U.S. company Ocean Infinity up to $70 million if it can find the wreckage or black boxes of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 within three months, in a renewed bid to solve the plane's disappearance nearly four years ago...
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