Science

FILE - In this Thursday, March 14, 2019 file photo, U.S. astronaut Christina Koch, member of the main crew of the expedition to the International Space Station (ISS), speaks with her relatives through a safety glass prior the launch of Soyuz MS-12 space ship at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. Koch told The Associated Press on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020, her 319th consecutive day in space _ that taking part in the first all-female spacewalk was the highlight of her mission. She's been living on the International Space Station since March and returns to Earth on Feb. 6, landing in Kazakhstan with two colleagues aboard a Russian capsule. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, Pool)
February 06, 2020 - 5:27 am
MOSCOW (AP) — NASA astronaut Christina Koch, who has spent nearly 11 months in orbit on the longest spaceflight by a woman, landed landed safely in Kazakhstan on Thursday along with two of her International Space Station crewmates. The Soyuz capsule carrying Koch, along with station Commander Luca...
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FILE - In this Thursday, March 14, 2019 file photo, U.S. astronaut Christina Koch, member of the main crew of the expedition to the International Space Station (ISS), speaks with her relatives through a safety glass prior the launch of Soyuz MS-12 space ship at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. Koch told The Associated Press on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020, her 319th consecutive day in space _ that taking part in the first all-female spacewalk was the highlight of her mission. She's been living on the International Space Station since March and returns to Earth on Feb. 6, landing in Kazakhstan with two colleagues aboard a Russian capsule. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, Pool)
February 06, 2020 - 4:39 am
MOSCOW (AP) — An international space station crew including NASA astronaut Christina Koch, who has spent more time in space on a single mission than any other woman, landed safely in Kazakhstan on Thursday. The Soyuz capsule carrying Koch, along with station Commander Luca Parmitano of the European...
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In this Jan. 11, 2020 photo a man photographs waves crashing onto the cliffs at Rodea Point in Lincoln County, Ore. during an extreme high tide that coincided with a big winter storm. Amateur scientists are whipping out their smartphones to document the effects of extreme high tides on shore lines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels due to climate change will mean for coastal communities around the world. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
February 05, 2020 - 1:01 pm
DEPOE BAY, Ore. (AP) — Tourists, nature lovers and amateur scientists are whipping out their cameras to document the effects of extreme high tides on shorelines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels will mean for coastal communities...
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In this handout photo taken in Jan. 2020 and provided by Nekton, scientists lower the “Limiting Factor” submarine into the Mediterranean Sea, part of sea trials before the next stage of the Nekton Mission begins in mid-March. A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean - into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches, but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in the unexplored area. (Nekton via AP)
February 05, 2020 - 12:37 pm
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean — into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in...
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In this handout photo taken in Jan. 2020 and provided by Nekton, scientists lower the “Limiting Factor” submarine into the Mediterranean Sea, part of sea trials before the next stage of the Nekton Mission begins in mid-March. A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean - into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches, but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in the unexplored area. (Nekton via AP)
February 05, 2020 - 2:25 am
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean — into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in...
Read More
In this handout photo taken in Jan. 2020 and provided by Nekton, scientists lower the “Limiting Factor” submarine into the Mediterranean Sea, part of sea trials before the next stage of the Nekton Mission begins in mid-March. A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean - into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches, but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in the unexplored area. (Nekton via AP)
February 05, 2020 - 2:16 am
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean — into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in...
Read More
In this Jan. 11, 2020 photo a man photographs waves crashing onto the cliffs at Rodea Point in Lincoln County, Ore. during an extreme high tide that coincided with a big winter storm. Amateur scientists are whipping out their smartphones to document the effects of extreme high tides on shore lines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels due to climate change will mean for coastal communities around the world. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
February 05, 2020 - 1:09 am
DEPOE BAY, Ore. (AP) — Tourists, nature lovers and amateur scientists are whipping out their cameras to document the effects of extreme high tides on shorelines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels will mean for coastal communities...
Read More
Pelicans fly over and sit on man made rock revetment on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, La., Monday, Feb. 3, 2020. The island provides a crucial nesting ground for pelicans and other seabirds and is being restored to nearly its former size after decades of coastal erosion and the devastating blow of an offshore oil spill 10 years ago. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
February 04, 2020 - 3:54 am
QUEEN BESS ISLAND, La. (AP) — A Louisiana island that provides a crucial nesting ground for pelicans and other seabirds is being restored to nearly its former size after decades of coastal erosion and a devastating offshore oil spill 10 years ago. Gov. John Bel Edwards visited the island Monday,...
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Pelicans fly over and sit on man made rock revetment on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, La., Monday, Feb. 3, 2020. The island provides a crucial nesting ground for pelicans and other seabirds and is being restored to nearly its former size after decades of coastal erosion and the devastating blow of an offshore oil spill 10 years ago. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
February 03, 2020 - 7:20 pm
QUEEN BESS ISLAND, La. (AP) — A Louisiana island that provides a crucial nesting ground for pelicans and other seabirds is being restored to nearly its former size after decades of coastal erosion and a devastating offshore oil spill 10 years ago. Gov. John Bel Edwards visited the island Monday,...
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Pelicans fly over and sit on man made rock revetment on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, La., Monday, Feb. 3, 2020. The island provides a crucial nesting ground for pelicans and other seabirds and is being restored to nearly its former size after decades of coastal erosion and the devastating blow of an offshore oil spill 10 years ago. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
February 03, 2020 - 6:25 pm
QUEEN BESS ISLAND, La. (AP) — A Louisiana island that provides a crucial nesting ground for pelicans and other seabirds is being restored to nearly its former size after decades of coastal erosion and a devastating offshore oil spill 10 years ago. About 6,500 brown pelicans and 3,000 smaller...
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