Science

FILE - In this May 17, 1999, file photo, two Makah Indian whalers stand atop the carcass of a dead gray whale moments after helping tow it close to shore in the harbor at Neah Bay, Wash. Earlier in the day, Makah Indians hunted and killed the whale in their first successful hunt since voluntarily quitting whaling over 70 years earlier. Two decades after the Makah Indian tribe in the northwestern corner of Washington state conducted its last legal whale hunt from a hand-carved canoe, lawyers, government officials and animal rights activists will gather in a small hearing room in Seattle to determine whether the tribe will be allowed once again to harpoon gray whales as its people had done from time immemorial. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
November 14, 2019 - 7:50 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Patrick DePoe was in high school the last time his Native American tribe in Washington state was allowed to hunt whales. He was on a canoe that greeted the crew towing in the body of a gray whale. His shop class worked to clean the bones and reassemble the skeleton, which hangs in a...
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File - In this Oct. 18, 2017, file photo, Asbestos Removal Technologies Inc., job superintendent Ryan Laitila, right, sprays amended water as job forman Megan Eberhart holds a light during asbestos abatement in Howell, Mich. A federal appeals court says the Trump administration unlawfully excluded millions of tons of some of the most dangerous materials in public use from a safety review. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
November 14, 2019 - 7:19 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration unlawfully excluded millions of tons of some of the most dangerous materials in public use from a safety review, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the U.S. Environmental...
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File - In this Oct. 18, 2017, file photo, Asbestos Removal Technologies Inc., job superintendent Ryan Laitila, right, sprays amended water as job forman Megan Eberhart holds a light during asbestos abatement in Howell, Mich. A federal appeals court says the Trump administration unlawfully excluded millions of tons of some of the most dangerous materials in public use from a safety review. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
November 14, 2019 - 7:08 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration unlawfully excluded millions of tons of some of the most dangerous materials in public use from a safety review, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the U.S. Environmental...
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FILE - This undated photo made available by NASA on Friday, Aug. 3, 2018 shows, from left, Sunita Williams, Josh Cassada, Eric Boe, Nicole Mann, Christopher Ferguson, Douglas Hurley, Robert Behnken, Michael Hopkins and Victor Glover standing in front of mockups of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsules at the Johnson Space Center in Texas. On Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019, NASA auditors warned the space agency faces “significant safety and technical challenges” that need to be solved before astronauts fly in private capsules. (NASA via AP)
November 14, 2019 - 5:33 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA auditors warned Thursday the space agency faces “significant safety and technical challenges” that need to be solved before astronauts fly in private capsules. In its report, NASA’s inspector general office noted Boeing and SpaceX are several years late in...
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FILE - In this May 17, 1999, file photo, two Makah Indian whalers stand atop the carcass of a dead gray whale moments after helping tow it close to shore in the harbor at Neah Bay, Wash. Earlier in the day, Makah Indians hunted and killed the whale in their first successful hunt since voluntarily quitting whaling over 70 years earlier. Two decades after the Makah Indian tribe in the northwestern corner of Washington state conducted its last legal whale hunt from a hand-carved canoe, lawyers, government officials and animal rights activists will gather in a small hearing room in Seattle to determine whether the tribe will be allowed once again to harpoon gray whales as its people had done from time immemorial. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
November 14, 2019 - 5:04 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Patrick DePoe was in high school the last time his Native American tribe in Washington state was allowed to hunt whales. He was on a canoe that greeted the crew towing in the body of a gray whale. His shop class worked to clean the bones and reassemble the skeleton, which hangs in a...
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In this Sept. 4, 2009 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, corals are seen at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico during an expedition called Reefs, Rigs and Wrecks. Federal regulators are close to approving a protection plan for vulnerable corals in the Gulf of Mexico that would create new protected zones designed to allow the corals to grow. The plan would create 21 protected areas off the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida (Dr. Ian MacDonald/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)
November 14, 2019 - 12:37 pm
A plan to protect corals in the Gulf of Mexico is close to becoming a law, drawing cheers from environmental groups who believe leaving the corals alone would help vulnerable ocean ecosystems to grow. The plan would create 21 protected areas off the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi...
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A lander is lifted during a test of hovering, obstacle avoidance and deceleration capabilities at a facility in Huailai in China's Hebei province, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019. China has invited international observers to the test of its Mars lander as it pushes for inclusion in more global space projects. Thursday's test was conducted at a site outside Beijing simulating conditions on the Red Planet, where the pull of gravity is about one-third that of Earth. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
November 14, 2019 - 11:35 am
HUAILAI, China (AP) — China showed off its Mars spacecraft during a landing test Thursday as the country pushes for inclusion in more global space projects. The demonstration of hovering, obstacle avoidance and deceleration capabilities was conducted at a site outside Beijing simulating conditions...
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A lander is lifted during a test of hovering, obstacle avoidance and deceleration capabilities at a facility in Huailai in China's Hebei province, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019. China has invited international observers to the test of its Mars lander as it pushes for inclusion in more global space projects. Thursday's test was conducted at a site outside Beijing simulating conditions on the Red Planet, where the pull of gravity is about one-third that of Earth. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
November 14, 2019 - 3:01 am
HUAILAI, China (AP) — China invited observers to a successful test Thursday of its Mars lander as the country pushes for inclusion in more global space projects. The demonstration of hovering, obstacle avoidance and deceleration capabilities was conducted at a site outside Beijing simulating...
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A lander is lifted during a test of hovering, obstacle avoidance and deceleration capabilities at a facility in Huailai in China's Hebei province, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019. China has invited international observers to the test of its Mars lander as it pushes for inclusion in more global space projects. Thursday's test was conducted at a site outside Beijing simulating conditions on the Red Planet, where the pull of gravity is about one-third that of Earth. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
November 14, 2019 - 2:13 am
HUAILAI, China (AP) — China invited international observers to a Thursday test of its Mars lander as it pushes for inclusion in more global space projects. The demonstration of hovering, obstacle avoidance and deceleration capabilities was conducted at a site outside Beijing simulating conditions...
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In this Aug. 20, 2019 file photo, a relative embraces a young patient receiving treatment for dengue at the University School Hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. In an international report released on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, doctors say children are growing up in a warmer world that will hit them with more and different health problems than their parents had. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
November 14, 2019 - 1:23 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Children are growing up in a warmer world that will hit them with more and different health problems than their parents experienced, an international report by doctors said. With increasing diarrhea diseases, more dangerous heat waves, air pollution and increases in mosquito-borne...
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