Science

October 15, 2018 - 12:27 pm
LONDON (AP) — Stephen Hawking has spoken from beyond the grave to warn the world that science and education are under threat around the world. The words of the scientist, who died in March at 76, were broadcast Monday at a London launch event for his final book "Brief Answers To The Big Questions...
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FILE - This Wednesday, April 19, 2017 file photo shows the beer cooler behind the counter in a convenience store in Sheridan, Ind. In future sweltering years with a double whammy of heat and drought, losses of barley yield can be as much as 17 percent, computer simulations show. And that means “beer prices would, on average, double,” even adjusting for inflation, said a study published in the journal Nature Plants on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
October 15, 2018 - 11:03 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Add beer to chocolate , coffee and wine as some of life's little pleasures that global warming will make scarcer and costlier, scientists say. Increasing bouts of extreme heat waves and drought will hurt production of barley, a key beer ingredient, in the future. Losses of barley...
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FILE - This Wednesday, April 19, 2017 file photo shows the beer cooler behind the counter in a convenience store in Sheridan, Ind. In future sweltering years with a double whammy of heat and drought, losses of barley yield can be as much as 17 percent, computer simulations show. And that means “beer prices would, on average, double,” even adjusting for inflation, said a study published in the journal Nature Plants on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
October 15, 2018 - 11:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study says global warming may leave people crying in their costlier beer. The international study says bouts of extreme heat waves and drought will cut production of barley, a key ingredient of beer. When that happens, beer prices on average could double. In countries like...
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President Donald Trump crosses the South Lawn on his return to the White House, Saturday Oct. 13, 2018, in Washington, after a trip to Kentucky. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
October 14, 2018 - 8:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is backing off his claim that climate change is a hoax but says he doesn't know if it's manmade and suggests that the climate will "change back again." In an interview with CBS' "60 Minutes" that aired Sunday night, Trump said he doesn't want to put the U.S...
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President Donald Trump crosses the South Lawn on his return to the White House, Saturday Oct. 13, 2018, in Washington, after a trip to Kentucky. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
October 14, 2018 - 8:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is backing off his claim that climate change is a hoax but says he doesn't know if it's manmade and suggests the climate will "change back again." In an interview with CBS' "60 Minutes," Trump says he doesn't want to put the U.S. at a disadvantage in...
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In this photo made available by Roscosmos on Friday, Oct. 12. 2018, agency leader Dmitry Rogozin, center, embraces cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin, left, and U.S. astronaut Nick Hague at Star City, Russia, a space training center outside Moscow. After an aborted launch on Thursday, Rogozin promised that Hague and Ovchinin will be given another chance soon to work on the International Space Station. (Roscosmos via AP)
October 12, 2018 - 3:59 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — NASA's chief heard one reassuring sound over the radio link after the aborted launch of a Soyuz capsule with an American and a Russian aboard. It was U.S. astronaut Nick Hague calmly relaying information in Russian to flight controllers. "My reaction was, 'things aren't going well and...
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In this photo released by Roscosmos, NASA Astronaut Nick Hague, left, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin pose for a photo in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018, after an emergency landing following the failure of a Russian booster rocket carrying them to the International Space Station. (Roscosmos via AP)
October 12, 2018 - 11:00 am
MOSCOW (AP) — A U.S. astronaut and his Russian crewmate arrived Friday at the Russian space center for medical checks following a failed launch that led to an emergency landing in the steppes of Kazakhstan. NASA's Nick Hague and Roscosmos' Alexei Ovchinin jettisoned in a rescue capsule from their...
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In this photo released by Roscosmos, NASA Astronaut Nick Hague, left, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin pose for a photo in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018, after an emergency landing following the failure of a Russian booster rocket carrying them to the International Space Station. (Roscosmos via AP)
October 12, 2018 - 7:00 am
MOSCOW (AP) — A U.S. astronaut and his Russian crewmate arrived Friday at the Russian space center for medical checks following a failed launch that led to an emergency landing in the steppes of Kazakhstan. NASA's Nick Hague and Roscosmos' Alexei Ovchinin blasted off to the International Space...
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FILE - In this Friday, April 27, 2018 file photo, Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, who authorities suspect is the "Golden State Killer" responsible for at least a dozen murders and 50 rapes in the 1970s and 80s, is accompanied by Sacramento County Public Defender Diane Howard, right, during his arraignment in Sacramento County Superior Court in Sacramento, Calif. Authorities said they used a genetic genealogy website to connect some crime-scene DNA to DeAngelo. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
October 11, 2018 - 2:02 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — About 60 percent of the U.S. population with European heritage may be identifiable from their DNA by searching consumer websites, even if they've never made their own genetic information available, a study estimates. And that number will grow as more and more people upload their DNA...
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FILE - In this Friday, April 27, 2018 file photo, Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, who authorities suspect is the "Golden State Killer" responsible for at least a dozen murders and 50 rapes in the 1970s and 80s, is accompanied by Sacramento County Public Defender Diane Howard, right, during his arraignment in Sacramento County Superior Court in Sacramento, Calif. Authorities said they used a genetic genealogy website to connect some crime-scene DNA to DeAngelo. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
October 11, 2018 - 2:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new study estimates that about 60 percent of the U.S. population with European heritage may be identifiable from their DNA by searching consumer websites, even if they've never made their own genetic information available. That number is expected to grow as more and more people...
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