Health

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2003, file photo, Rep. Stephanie Stuckey Benfield, D-Decatur, promotes the breast cancer prevention stamp from the well on the floor of the House in Atlanta. Countless breast cancer patients in the future will be spared millions of dollars of chemotherapy thanks in part to something that millions of Americans did that cost them just pennies: bought a postage stamp. Proceeds from the U.S. Postal Service's breast cancer stamp enabled a landmark study that showed which women need chemo and which do not. (AP Photo/Ric Feld, File)
June 04, 2018 - 4:58 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Countless breast cancer patients in the future will be spared millions of dollars of chemotherapy thanks in part to something that millions of Americans did that cost them just pennies: bought a postage stamp. Proceeds from the U.S. Postal Service's breast cancer stamp put...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2003, file photo, Rep. Stephanie Stuckey Benfield, D-Decatur, promotes the breast cancer prevention stamp from the well on the floor of the House in Atlanta. Countless breast cancer patients in the future will be spared millions of dollars of chemotherapy thanks in part to something that millions of Americans did that cost them just pennies: bought a postage stamp. Proceeds from the U.S. Postal Service's breast cancer stamp enabled a landmark study that showed which women need chemo and which do not. (AP Photo/Ric Feld, File)
June 04, 2018 - 12:03 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Countless breast cancer patients in the future will be spared millions of dollars of chemotherapy thanks in part to something that millions of Americans did that cost them just pennies: bought a postage stamp. Proceeds from the U.S. Postal Service's breast cancer stamp put...
Read More
FILE - In this June 14, 2011, file photo, various prescription drugs on the automated pharmacy assembly line at Medco Health Solutions in Willingboro, N.J. Medicare recipients cut back on pricey brand-name drugs but they still had to spend more on such medications anyway, according to a government report that blames rising manufacturer prices for squeezing older people and taxpayers. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
June 04, 2018 - 9:49 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare recipients filled fewer prescriptions for pricey brand-name drugs — but spent more on such meds anyway, says a government report released Monday. It blames rising manufacturer prices for squeezing older people and taxpayers. The Health and Human Services inspector general...
Read More
FILE - In this June 14, 2011, file photo, various prescription drugs on the automated pharmacy assembly line at Medco Health Solutions in Willingboro, N.J. Medicare recipients cut back on pricey brand-name drugs but they still had to spend more on such medications anyway, according to a government report that blames rising manufacturer prices for squeezing older people and taxpayers. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
June 04, 2018 - 6:10 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare recipients filled fewer prescriptions for pricey brand-name drugs — but spent more on such meds anyway, says a government report due out Monday. It blames rising manufacturer prices for squeezing older people and taxpayers. The Health and Human Services inspector general'...
Read More
FILE - In this June 14, 2011, file photo, various prescription drugs on the automated pharmacy assembly line at Medco Health Solutions in Willingboro, N.J. Medicare recipients cut back on pricey brand-name drugs but they still had to spend more on such medications anyway, according to a government report that blames rising manufacturer prices for squeezing older people and taxpayers. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
June 04, 2018 - 12:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare recipients filled fewer prescriptions for pricey brand-name drugs — but spent more on such meds anyway, says a government report due out Monday. It blames rising manufacturer prices for squeezing older people and taxpayers. The Health and Human Services inspector general'...
Read More
FILE - In this June 14, 2011, file photo, various prescription drugs on the automated pharmacy assembly line at Medco Health Solutions in Willingboro, N.J. Medicare recipients cut back on pricey brand-name drugs but they still had to spend more on such medications anyway, according to a government report that blames rising manufacturer prices for squeezing older people and taxpayers. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
June 04, 2018 - 12:57 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new government report says Medicare recipients filled fewer prescriptions for pricey brand-name drugs — but spent more on such meds anyway. The Health and Human Services inspector general's office blames rising manufacturer prices for squeezing older people and taxpayers alike...
Read More
In this Thursday, May 24, 2018 photo, Adine Usher, 78, meets with breast cancer study leader Dr. Joseph Sparano at the Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx borough of New York. Usher was one of about 10,000 participants in the study which shows women at low or intermediate risk for breast cancer recurrence may safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of survival. (AP Photo/Kathy Young)
June 03, 2018 - 4:20 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, doctors are reporting from a landmark study that used genetic testing to gauge each patient's risk. The study is the largest ever done...
Read More
In this Thursday, May 24, 2018 photo, Adine Usher, 78, meets with breast cancer study leader Dr. Joseph Sparano at the Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx borough of New York. Usher was one of about 10,000 participants in the study which shows women at low or intermediate risk for breast cancer recurrence may safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of survival. (AP Photo/Kathy Young)
June 03, 2018 - 7:32 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, doctors are reporting from a landmark study that used genetic testing to gauge each patient's risk. The study is the largest ever done...
Read More
In this Thursday, May 24, 2018 photo, Adine Usher, 78, meets with breast cancer study leader Dr. Joseph Sparano at the Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx borough of New York. Usher was one of about 10,000 participants in the study which shows women at low or intermediate risk for breast cancer recurrence may safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of survival. (AP Photo/Kathy Young)
June 03, 2018 - 7:30 am
CHICAGO (AP) — The largest study ever done of breast cancer treatment finds that most women with the most common form of the disease can skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the cancer. The results are expected to spare up to 70,000 patients a year in the United States and...
Read More
June 02, 2018 - 10:58 am
TALLINN, Estonia (AP) — A Danish group says a citizens' initiative seeking to set a minimum age of 18 for non-medical male circumcision in Denmark has gathered the required 50,000 signatures to send the proposal to Parliament for debate this year. Lena Nyhus of Intact Denmark told The Associated...
Read More

Pages