Health

FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2018, file photo, Atlanta Falcons head coach Dan Quinn is shown during their NFL training camp football practice in Flowery Branch, Ga. Quinn said he's had a spot "removed or checked on" in annual skin cancer checks during physical exams. He and some of his assistants normally wear long shirts under their T-shirts during practice _ despite the Georgia heat and humidity. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)
August 17, 2018 - 5:02 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The toughest opponent for many NFL players and coaches during the blazing hot days of training camp sits far above the football field. The sun's powerful ultraviolet rays are a leading cause of skin cancer, and shade is rare at most practice sites. So, slathered-on sunscreen, big...
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This combination photo shows, top row from left, Ed helms, Bradley Cooper, Reese Witherspoon and Keith Urban, and bottom row from left, Mahershala Ali, Jennifer Garner, Maria Menounos and Marg Helgenberger, who are among the stars joining the sixth Stand Up To Cancer telethon on Sept. 7. Cooper is returning as co-executive producer of the live, hour-long event. (AP Photo)
August 16, 2018 - 7:03 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Reese Witherspoon, Mahershala Ali and Keith Urban are among the stars joining the sixth Stand Up To Cancer telethon. Jennifer Garner, Trevor Noah, Marlee Matlin, Matthew McConaughey and organization co-founder Katie Couric also will take part in the Sept. 7 fundraiser. Stand Up...
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This combination photo shows, top row from left, Ed helms, Bradley Cooper, Reese Witherspoon and Keith Urban, and bottom row from left, Mahershala Ali, Jennifer Garner, Maria Menounos and Marg Helgenberger, who are among the stars joining the sixth Stand Up To Cancer telethon on Sept. 7. Cooper is returning as co-executive producer of the live, hour-long event. (AP Photo)
August 16, 2018 - 7:02 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Reese Witherspoon and Keith Urban are among the stars joining the sixth Stand Up To Cancer telethon. Jennifer Garner, Trevor Noah and Katie Couric also will take part in the Sept. 7 fundraiser. Bradley Cooper is returning as co-executive producer of the live, hour-long event. It...
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FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 13, 2017 file photo, a nurse practitioner prepares to start the first human gene editing treatment for Hunter syndrome, an inherited metabolic disease, at a hospital in Oakland, Calif. On Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, federal officials said that gene therapy is becoming an established form of medical care and carries no special risks that warrant special regulation, as they revised rules for vetting such experiments and products. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
August 15, 2018 - 6:57 pm
U.S. health officials are eliminating special regulations for gene therapy experiments, saying that what was once exotic science is quickly becoming an established form of medical care with no extraordinary risks. A special National Institutes of Health oversight panel will no longer review all...
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FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 13, 2017 file photo, a nurse practitioner prepares to start the first human gene editing treatment for Hunter syndrome, an inherited metabolic disease, at a hospital in Oakland, Calif. On Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, federal officials said that gene therapy is becoming an established form of medical care and carries no special risks that warrant special regulation, as they revised rules for vetting such experiments and products. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
August 15, 2018 - 6:05 pm
U.S. health officials are eliminating special regulations for gene therapy experiments. They say that what was once exotic science is quickly becoming an established form of medical care with no extraordinary risks. Gene therapy aims to get at the root cause of a disease by altering DNA rather than...
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FILE - In this June 22, 2012 file photo, a smoker extinguishes a cigarette in an ash tray in Sacramento, Calif. If you quit smoking and gain weight, it may seem like you’re trading one set of health problems for another. But a new U.S. study released on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018 finds you’re still better off in the long run. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
August 15, 2018 - 5:06 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — If you quit smoking and gain weight, it may seem like you're trading one set of health problems for another. But a new U.S. study finds you're still better off in the long run. Compared with smokers, even the quitters who gained the most weight had at least a 50 percent lower risk...
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FILE - In this June 22, 2012 file photo, a smoker extinguishes a cigarette in an ash tray in Sacramento, Calif. If you quit smoking and gain weight, it may seem like you’re trading one set of health problems for another. But a new U.S. study released on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018 finds you’re still better off in the long run. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
August 15, 2018 - 5:02 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — If you quit smoking and gain weight, it may seem like you're trading one set of health problems for another. But a new U.S. study finds you're still better off in the long run. The Harvard-led study found that compared with smokers, even the quitters who gained the most weight had...
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This undated photo provided by the National Cancer Institute shows Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., winner of the 2018 Albany Medical Center's Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research. (Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute via AP)
August 15, 2018 - 8:37 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Tumors once considered untreatable have disappeared and people previously given months to live are surviving for decades thanks to new therapies emerging from the work of three scientists chosen to receive a $500,000 medical prize. The recipients of the annual Albany Medical...
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This undated photo provided by the National Cancer Institute shows Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., winner of the 2018 Albany Medical Center's Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research. (Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute via AP)
August 15, 2018 - 8:34 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Three scientists will share a $500,000 medical prize for their studies of the immune system that have led to innovative treatments for cancer, HIV and other diseases. The recipients of the annual Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research were announced...
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In this Aug. 1, 2018 photo, Lauren Woehr hands her 16-month-old daughter Caroline, held by her husband Dan McDowell, a cup filled with bottled water at their home in Horsham, Pa. In Horsham and surrounding towns in eastern Pennsylvania, and at other sites around the United States, the foams once used routinely in firefighting training at military bases contained per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. EPA testing between 2013 and 2015 found significant amounts of PFAS in public water supplies in 33 U.S. states. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
August 13, 2018 - 2:50 pm
HORSHAM, Pa. (AP) — Lauren Woeher wonders if her 16-month-old daughter has been harmed by tap water contaminated with toxic industrial compounds used in products like nonstick cookware, carpets, firefighting foam and fast-food wrappers. Henry Betz, at 76, rattles around his house alone at night,...
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