Health

FILE - In this file photo taken Nov. 22, 2014, Blue Bridge Benefits LLC agent Patricia Sarabia, right, and Adolfo Briceno, left, with Spanish Speaking LLC, help a potential customer with Blue Cross Blue Shield at a kiosk promoting Obama Care at Compare Foods in Winston-Salem, N.C. A new poll finds that more than half of Hispanic adults have encountered a communication barrier in the health care system. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, file)
July 27, 2018 - 1:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new poll finds that nearly 6 in 10 Hispanic adults have had a difficult time communicating with a health care provider because of a language or cultural barrier. The poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that half of those who have faced...
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July 26, 2018 - 11:31 am
LONDON (AP) — The British government says doctors will now be able to legally prescribe cannabis-based medicines, following criticism over the denial of medical treatment to severely epileptic children. Home Secretary Sajid Javid relaxed the rules Thursday after considering expert advice from a...
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FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo President Donald Trump , left, and Texas State Sen. Dawn Buckingham, right, listen as Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Seema Verma speaks during a meeting on women in healthcare in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. Verma is slamming ‘Medicare for All,’ the proposal from Vermont Democratic Sen. Bernie Sanders for a national health care plan that would cover all Americans. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
July 25, 2018 - 6:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's Medicare chief on Wednesday slammed Sen. Bernie Sanders' call for a national health plan, saying "Medicare for All" would undermine care for seniors and become "Medicare for None." The broadside from Medicare and Medicaid administrator Seema Verma came...
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Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin speaks with reporters about a new report detailing an increase in drug overdose deaths on Wednesday, July 25, 2018, in Frankfort, Ky. (AP Photo/Adam Beam)
July 25, 2018 - 6:14 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Since 2011, a year when Kentucky was flooded with 371 million doses of opioid painkillers, state officials have cracked down on pain clinics, sued pharmaceutical companies and limited how many pills doctors can prescribe. The result is nearly 100 million fewer opioid...
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July 25, 2018 - 5:56 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Since 2011, a year when Kentucky was flooded with 371 million doses of opioid painkillers, state officials have cracked down on pain clinics, sued pharmaceutical companies and limited how many pills doctors can prescribe. The result is nearly 100 million fewer opioid...
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July 25, 2018 - 5:55 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Drug overdose deaths in Kentucky are increasing despite a drop in opioid prescriptions and heroin use. A new report from the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy says 1,565 people died from drug overdoses in 2017. That's an 11.5 percent increase from 2016. Kentucky overdose...
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FILE - This Oct. 7, 2003 file photo shows a section of a human brain with Alzheimer's disease on display at the Museum of Neuroanatomy at the University at Buffalo, in Buffalo, N.Y. On Wednesday, July 25, 2018, two drug makers said an experimental therapy slowed mental decline by 30 percent in patients who got the highest dose in a mid-stage study, and it removed much of the sticky plaque gumming up their brains. The drug, called BAN2401, is from Eisai and Biogen. (AP Photo/David Duprey)
July 25, 2018 - 4:38 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Hopes are rising again for a drug to alter the course of Alzheimer's disease after repeated failures. Two drug companies said that an experimental therapy they are developing slowed mental decline by 30 percent in patients who got the highest dose. It also removed much of the sticky...
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In this March 23, 2017 photo provided by the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, patient Rick Karr is prepared for treatment at the facility in Toronto, Canada. Karr was the first Alzheimer's patient treated with focused ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier. Scientists are using ultrasound waves to temporarily jiggle an opening in the brain’s protective shield, in hopes the technique one day might help drugs for Alzheimer’s, brain tumors and other diseases better reach their target. (Kevin Van Paassen/Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre via AP)
July 25, 2018 - 1:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A handful of Alzheimer's patients signed up for a bold experiment: They let scientists beam sound waves into the brain to temporarily jiggle an opening in its protective shield. The so-called blood-brain barrier prevents germs and other damaging substances from leaching in through...
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In this March 23, 2017 photo provided by the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, patient Rick Karr is prepared for treatment at the facility in Toronto, Canada. Karr was the first Alzheimer's patient treated with focused ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier. Scientists are using ultrasound waves to temporarily jiggle an opening in the brain’s protective shield, in hopes the technique one day might help drugs for Alzheimer’s, brain tumors and other diseases better reach their target. (Kevin Van Paassen/Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre via AP)
July 25, 2018 - 1:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A handful of Alzheimer's patients signed up for a bold experiment: They let scientists beam sound waves into the brain to temporarily jiggle an opening in its protective shield. That shield, called the blood-brain barrier, prevents germs and other damaging substances from leaching...
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Margaret Graham, 74, has her blood pressure checked while visiting the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C., on Friday, July 13, 2018. She had participated in a multi-year study, published on Wednesday, July 25, 2018, investigating a connection between high blood pressure and the risk of mental decline. "I feel like maybe with this study, some findings may come that will develop new drugs and also new activities, exercise, theories that will help people to maintain an acceptable blood pressure level," Graham says. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)
July 25, 2018 - 9:42 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Lowering blood pressure more than usually recommended not only helps prevent heart problems, it also cuts the risk of mental decline that often leads to Alzheimer's disease, a major study finds. It's the first time a single step has been clearly shown to help prevent a dreaded...
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