Health

HOLD FOR USE WITH STORY MOVING WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2018-In this Feb. 23, 2018 photo Air Force veteran Ed Warren, 82, and his wife, Jac Warren, 81, pose for a photo while visiting San Diego, to attend the Democrats' annual convention and talk to lawmakers. The couple is voicing opposition to a regulation that requires veterans in state homes to be discharged before they can use a new state law allowing physician-assisted deaths for the terminally ill. The California Department of Veterans Affairs officials say the Department of Veterans Affairs does not allow federal funds to be used for assisted suicides. The couple lives at the nation's largest retirement home in Yountville, California. (AP Photo by Julie Watson)
March 07, 2018 - 2:29 am
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Suffering from heart problems, Bob Sloan told his children he wants to use California's new law allowing life-ending drugs for the terminally ill when his disease becomes too advanced to bear. But then the 73-year-old former U.S. Army sergeant learned that because he lives at the...
Read More
HOLD FOR USE WITH STORY MOVING WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2018-In this Feb. 23, 2018 photo Air Force veteran Ed Warren, 82, and his wife, Jac Warren, 81, pose for a photo while visiting San Diego, to attend the Democrats' annual convention and talk to lawmakers. The couple is voicing opposition to a regulation that requires veterans in state homes to be discharged before they can use a new state law allowing physician-assisted deaths for the terminally ill. The California Department of Veterans Affairs officials say the Department of Veterans Affairs does not allow federal funds to be used for assisted suicides. The couple lives at the nation's largest retirement home in Yountville, California. (AP Photo by Julie Watson)
March 07, 2018 - 2:27 am
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Veterans in California and other states that that have legalized physician-assisted deaths are finding they cannot access such laws in most government-run homes because they conflict with the policies of the Department of Veterans Affairs. In California, the nation's largest...
Read More
FILE - In this June 13, 2017, file photo, a man injects heroin into this arm under a bridge along the Wishkah River at Kurt Cobain Memorial Park in Aberdeen, Wash. The government said non-fatal overdoses visits to hospital emergency rooms were up about 30 percent late last summer, compared to the same three-month period in 2016. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the numbers Tuesday, March 6, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
March 06, 2018 - 3:37 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Emergency rooms saw a big jump in overdoses from opioids last year — the latest evidence the nation's drug crisis is getting worse. A government report released Tuesday shows overdoses from opioids increased 30 percent late last summer, compared to the same three-month period in...
Read More
FILE - In this June 13, 2017, file photo, a man injects heroin into this arm under a bridge along the Wishkah River at Kurt Cobain Memorial Park in Aberdeen, Wash. The government said non-fatal overdoses visits to hospital emergency rooms were up about 30 percent late last summer, compared to the same three-month period in 2016. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the numbers Tuesday, March 6, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
March 06, 2018 - 2:38 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Emergency rooms saw a big jump in overdoses from opioids last year — the latest evidence the nation's drug crisis is getting worse. A government report released Tuesday shows overdoses from opioids increased 30 percent late last summer, compared to the same three-month period in...
Read More
March 06, 2018 - 1:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators have approved the first direct-to-consumer breast cancer gene test. But the Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday it will require warnings about the limitations of the genetic information from California-based 23andMe. The test, which analyzes DNA from saliva,...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010, file photo, a pharmacy technician poses for a picture with hydrocodone and acetaminophen tablets, also known as Vicodin, at the Oklahoma Hospital Discount Pharmacy in Edmond, Okla. Opioids including Vicodin and fentanyl patches worked no better than Tylenol and other over-the-counter pills at relieving chronic back pain and hip and knee arthritis in a year-long study of mostly men at Minneapolis VA clinics. Both groups had slight improvement. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
March 06, 2018 - 11:19 am
CHICAGO (AP) — A yearlong study offers rigorous new evidence against using prescription opioids for chronic pain. In patients with stubborn back aches or hip or knee arthritis, opioids worked no better than over-the-counter drugs or other nonopioids at reducing problems with walking or sleeping...
Read More
March 06, 2018 - 7:23 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Nail salon drying lamps would be regulated under a bill passed by New York's state Senate. The Times Union says the lamps use ultraviolet rays. The amount of exposure is very small when compared to tanning beds but concerns have been raised about the long-term effects. The...
Read More
In this March 2, 2018, photo, Christine Sheppard works with her loom in her home in Oceanside, Calif. Claims that the active ingredient in the widely used weed killer Roundup can cause cancer have been evaluated by international agencies, U.S. and foreign regulators and the product's manufacturer, agribusiness giant Monsanto. Sheppard, among those suing Monsanto, said she sprayed Roundup for years to control weeds on her Hawaii coffee farm. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
March 05, 2018 - 6:36 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal judge on Monday waded into the arcane science behind claims that the widely used weed killer Roundup can cause cancer. The expected weeklong testimony is intended to help him determine whether a jury should hear from doctors who link the product to non-Hodgkin's...
Read More
March 05, 2018 - 6:33 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The head of the Food and Drug Administration wants to more than double the number of packages his agency inspects for illicit drugs, an effort to stem a deadly flow of opioids that increasingly runs through the international mail supply. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said Monday...
Read More
FILE- In this Jan. 31, 2018, file photo, a Lyft logo is installed on a Lyft driver's car next to an Uber sticker in Pittsburgh. Lyft and Uber are expanding deeper into health care by offering to take more patients to and from non-emergency medical appointments in markets around the country. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
March 05, 2018 - 4:38 pm
Lyft and Uber are attempting to cure a major medical problem for poor people and the elderly: Getting a ride to the doctor. The ride-hailing services are expanding their offer to take patients around the country to and from non-emergency health care appointments, and they have a huge market to...
Read More

Pages