Health

June 23, 2018 - 4:34 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — A Houston hospital that suspended its renowned heart transplant program for two weeks amid scrutiny following the deaths of two patients could lose federal Medicaid funding. Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center was notified Friday that Medicare plans to halt funding to its heart...
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June 23, 2018 - 2:40 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — A Houston hospital that suspended its renowned heart transplant program for two weeks amid scrutiny following the deaths of two patients could lose federal Medicaid funding. The Houston Chronicle reports Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center was notified Friday that Medicare plans to halt...
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FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2017, file photo, activists with Planned Parenthood demonstrate in support of a pregnant 17-year-old being held in a Texas facility for unaccompanied immigrant children to obtain an abortion, outside of the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington. Several affiliates of Planned Parenthood are suing the Department of Health and Human Services over its efforts to impose an abstinence-only focus on its Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program that has served more than 1 million young people. The lawsuits were filed Friday, June 22, 2018, in federal courts in New York City and Spokane, Washington, by four different Planned Parenthood affiliates covering New York City and the states of Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Nebraska and Washington.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
June 22, 2018 - 8:31 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Several affiliates of Planned Parenthood sued the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Friday over its efforts to impose an abstinence-only focus on its Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program that has served more than 1 million young people. The lawsuits were filed in...
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FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2015 file photo supporters of a measure to allow terminally ill people to end their own life march at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. California health officials say 374 terminally ill people took drugs to end their lives in 2017, the first full year after a law making the option legal took effect. They added, 577 people received aid-in-dying drugs in 2017, but not everyone used them. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
June 22, 2018 - 8:02 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California health officials reported Friday that 374 terminally ill people took drugs to end their lives in 2017, the first full year after a law made the option legal. The California Department of Public Health said 577 people received aid-in-dying drugs last year, but...
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FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2015 file photo supporters of a measure to allow terminally ill people to end their own life march at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. California health officials say 374 terminally ill people took drugs to end their lives in 2017, the first full year after a law making the option legal took effect. They added, 577 people received aid-in-dying drugs in 2017, but not everyone used them. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
June 22, 2018 - 6:49 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California health officials reported Friday that 374 terminally ill people took drugs to end their lives in 2017, the first full year after a law made the option legal. The California Department of Public Health said 577 people received aid-in-dying drugs last year, but...
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June 22, 2018 - 1:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The House has overwhelmingly approved legislation designed to give health care providers more tools to stem an opioid crisis killing more than 115 people in the United States daily. The legislation passed Friday by a vote of 396-14. It's one of dozens of opioid-related bills that...
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An 800-pound sculpture, titled "Purdue," created by artist Domenic Esposito is displayed outside the Connecticut headquarters of drugmaker Purdue Pharma, Friday, June 22, 2018, in Stamford, Conn. The sculpture was inspired to create by Esposito's brother's battle with addiction. Several state and local governments are suing Purdue Pharma for allegedly using deceptive marketing to boost sales of its opioid painkiller OxyContin, blamed for opioid overdose deaths. (Susan Dunne/Hartford Courant via AP)
June 22, 2018 - 1:23 pm
STAMFORD, Conn. (AP) — An 800-pound, nearly 11-foot-long steel sculpture of a bent and burned drug spoon was placed Friday in front of the Connecticut headquarters of drugmaker Purdue Pharma as part of an art protest against the opioid crisis. Artist Domenic Esposito and art gallery owner Fernando...
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FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2017, file photo, tourists ride a classic convertible car on the Malecon beside the United States Embassy in Havana, Cuba. Medical tests have confirmed that one additional U.S. Embassy worker has been affected by mysterious health incidents in Cuba, bringing the total number to 25. That's according to an unclassified notice sent to congressional officials by the State Department. (AP Photo/Desmond Boylan, File)
June 22, 2018 - 2:50 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Medical tests have confirmed that one additional U.S. Embassy worker has been affected by mysterious health incidents in Cuba, the State Department said, bringing the total number to 25. The new "medically confirmed" worker is one of two who were recently evacuated from Cuba after...
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This photo shows 1978 employment application information for Dr. Richard Strauss, from Ohio State University’s personnel files reviewed by The Associated Press. Strauss, who died in 2005, and is now accused of sexual misconduct by former student athletes at the university, once said he acted as a team physician elsewhere. But most of the universities he listed as former employers won't say if they're reviewing either potential connections or whether concerns were raised about him. (Ohio State University via AP)
June 21, 2018 - 4:55 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A now-dead doctor accused of sexual misconduct by former student athletes at Ohio State University said he acted as a team physician at other universities, most of which won't say if they are reviewing those connections or whether any concerns were raised about him. Ohio State...
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June 21, 2018 - 11:22 am
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The Arkansas Supreme Court on Thursday cleared the way for the state to launch its medical marijuana program, reversing and dismissing a judge's ruling that prevented officials from issuing the first license for businesses to grow the drug. Pulaski County Judge Wendell...
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