Gubernatorial elections

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders looks to President Donald Trump as she speaks during an event on second chance hiring in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, June 13, 2019, in Washington. Sanders is leaving her job at the end of the month. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
June 14, 2019 - 4:42 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Speculation that White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders could run for governor in her home state of Arkansas is shaking up a race three years away that was already expected to attract a crowd of Republican candidates. President Donald Trump encouraged Sanders to run for...
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FILE - In this April 3, 2019 file photo, former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, Jr. speaks during the National Action Network Convention in New York. A new federal lawsuit being filed Thursday, May 30 by three African American residents of Mississippi seeks to block what it calls the state’s racist method of electing the governor and other statewide officials. The lawsuit takes aim at Mississippi’s unique requirement that candidates for statewide office must win both a majority of the popular vote and at least 62 of the 122 state House of Representatives districts. Holder said a judge could order Mississippi to do what most states already do - “count all the votes and the person who gets the greatest number of votes wins.” (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
May 30, 2019 - 5:13 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — In 1890, as white politicians across the South cracked down on the black population with Jim Crow laws, Mississippi inserted into its constitution an unusually high bar for getting elected governor or winning any other statewide office. The provision, which remains in force to...
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FILE - In this April 3, 2019 file photo, former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, Jr. speaks during the National Action Network Convention in New York. A new federal lawsuit being filed Thursday, May 30 by three African American residents of Mississippi seeks to block what it calls the state’s racist method of electing the governor and other statewide officials. The lawsuit takes aim at Mississippi’s unique requirement that candidates for statewide office must win both a majority of the popular vote and at least 62 of the 122 state House of Representatives districts. Holder said a judge could order Mississippi to do what most states already do - “count all the votes and the person who gets the greatest number of votes wins.” (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
May 30, 2019 - 4:29 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — In 1890, as white politicians across the South cracked down on the black population with Jim Crow laws, Mississippi inserted into its constitution an unusually high bar for getting elected governor or winning any other statewide office. The provision, which remains in force to...
Read More
FILE - In this April 3, 2019 file photo, former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, Jr. speaks during the National Action Network Convention in New York. A new federal lawsuit being filed Thursday, May 30 by three African American residents of Mississippi seeks to block what it calls the state’s racist method of electing the governor and other statewide officials. The lawsuit takes aim at Mississippi’s unique requirement that candidates for statewide office must win both a majority of the popular vote and at least 62 of the 122 state House of Representatives districts. Holder said a judge could order Mississippi to do what most states already do - “count all the votes and the person who gets the greatest number of votes wins.” (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
May 30, 2019 - 3:24 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — In 1890, as white politicians across the South cracked down on the black population with Jim Crow laws, Mississippi inserted into its constitution an unusually high bar for getting elected governor or winning any other statewide office. The provision, which remains in force to...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2019 file photo, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, left, gestures as his wife, Pam, listens during a news conference in the Governors Mansion at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. A law firm has completed its investigation into how a racist photo appeared on a yearbook page for Northam. Eastern Virginia Medical School said in a statement Tuesday, May 21 that the findings of the investigation will be announced at a press conference on Wednesday, May 22. Northam's profile in the 1984 yearbook includes a photo of a man in blackface standing next to someone in Ku Klux Klan clothing. Northam denies being in the photo, which nearly ended his political career in February. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
May 22, 2019 - 1:40 pm
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — The mystery of whether Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam was in the racist yearbook photo that nearly destroyed his career remains unsolved. A months-long investigation ordered up by Eastern Virginia Medical School failed to determine whether Northam is in the picture published in...
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FILE - In this combination of file photos Democratic candidate for Kentucky governor Attorney General Andy Beshear, left, responds during a debate at Transylvania University in Lexington, Ky., on April 24, 2019 and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin speaks in the Capitol building in Frankfort, Ky., on Feb. 28, 2019. In Kentucky political circles, Beshear vs. Bevin has become shorthand for the bitter feud between the state's governor and attorney general over legal issues with sweeping implications for the future. The two won their parties' nominations in the primary election for governor on Tuesday, May 21. Now they will square off in November in a grudge match that will have national political experts watching for signs that a Republican incumbent closely aligned with the president might be more vulnerable than expected. (AP Photo/File)
May 22, 2019 - 12:49 pm
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — In Kentucky political circles, Beshear vs. Bevin has become shorthand for the bitter feud between the state's governor and attorney general over legal issues with sweeping implications for the future. The drama between Republican Gov. Matt Bevin and Democratic Attorney...
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FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2019 file photo, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, left, gestures as his wife, Pam, listens during a news conference in the Governors Mansion at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. A law firm has completed its investigation into how a racist photo appeared on a yearbook page for Northam. Eastern Virginia Medical School said in a statement Tuesday, May 21 that the findings of the investigation will be announced at a press conference on Wednesday, May 22. Northam's profile in the 1984 yearbook includes a photo of a man in blackface standing next to someone in Ku Klux Klan clothing. Northam denies being in the photo, which nearly ended his political career in February. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
May 22, 2019 - 10:37 am
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — An investigation ordered up by a Virginia medical school failed to determine whether Gov. Ralph Northam is in a 1984 yearbook photo of a man in blackface next to someone in a Ku Klux Klan hood. Investigators with a law firm hired by Eastern Virginia Medical School said Wednesday...
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FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2019 file photo, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, left, gestures as his wife, Pam, listens during a news conference in the Governors Mansion at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. A law firm has completed its investigation into how a racist photo appeared on a yearbook page for Northam. Eastern Virginia Medical School said in a statement Tuesday, May 21 that the findings of the investigation will be announced at a press conference on Wednesday, May 22. Northam's profile in the 1984 yearbook includes a photo of a man in blackface standing next to someone in Ku Klux Klan clothing. Northam denies being in the photo, which nearly ended his political career in February. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
May 22, 2019 - 10:31 am
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — A law firm investigating a racist picture of a man in blackface standing next to someone in Ku Klux Klan clothing on Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam's medical school yearbook page says it's unable to determine whether the governor is in the picture. Investigators on behalf of...
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FILE - In this combination of file photos Democratic candidate for Kentucky governor Attorney General Andy Beshear, left, responds during a debate at Transylvania University in Lexington, Ky., on April 24, 2019 and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin speaks in the Capitol building in Frankfort, Ky., on Feb. 28, 2019. In Kentucky political circles, Beshear vs. Bevin has become shorthand for the bitter feud between the state's governor and attorney general over legal issues with sweeping implications for the future. The two won their parties' nominations in the primary election for governor on Tuesday, May 21. Now they will square off in November in a grudge match that will have national political experts watching for signs that a Republican incumbent closely aligned with the president might be more vulnerable than expected. (AP Photo/File)
May 22, 2019 - 10:22 am
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — In Kentucky political circles, Beshear vs. Bevin has become shorthand for the bitter feud between the state's governor and attorney general over legal issues with sweeping implications for the future. The drama between Republican Gov. Matt Bevin and Democratic Attorney...
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FILE - In this March 26, 2019, file photo, Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin speaks with the media during an event about the new Interstate 165 in Bowling Green, Ky. Kentucky Republicans will give an initial verdict on Bevin’s job performance in the state's primary election Tuesday, May 21. Meanwhile, Democrats will choose from three prominent candidates looking to challenge Bevin, an ally of President Donald Trump. (Bac Totrong/Daily News via AP, File)
May 21, 2019 - 9:51 pm
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin cleared his first hurdle toward a second term despite a strong Republican primary challenge Tuesday, setting up a showdown with his arch-nemesis — Democrat Andy Beshear — that will settle the feud they've fought in courtrooms over education and...
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