Environment and nature

In this Tuesday, May 12, 2020 image provided by Ouwehands Zoo, giant panda Wu Wen holds her newly born cub, at Ouwehands Zoo, in Rhenen, Netherlands, A giant panda loaned by China to a Dutch zoo as part of a breeding pair, give birth to a cub on Friday May 1, 2020. "Now, almost two weeks later, the cub has visibly grown. Not just in length, but clearly in weight, too. Its well-filled belly is prominent and the distinctive coloring is very finely starting to appear. The shoulders and front paws exhibit the contours of a dark (grey-black) pattern. Also striking is the panda cub's relatively long tail", Ouwehands Zoo said in a statement. (Ouwehands Zoo/via AP)
May 12, 2020 - 8:26 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Little shrieks of excitement highlighted the fist video appearance by the tiny cub of a giant panda at a Dutch zoo on Tuesday, a sure sign it now stood a solid chance of survival. The Ouwehands Zoo where the cub was born on May 1 distributed the first pictures and...
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FILE - In this April 4, 2008 file photo, Marines wait for a desert tortoise, endangered and protected by federal law from harm or harassment, to move off the road at the U.S. Marine Corps' Air Ground Combat Center at Twentynine Palms, Calif. The Trump administration has given final approval to the largest solar energy project in the U.S. and one of the biggest in the world despite objections from conservationists who say it will destroy habitat critical to the survival of the threatened Mojave desert tortoise in southern Nevada. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)
May 11, 2020 - 6:57 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — The Trump administration announced final approval Monday of the largest solar energy project in the U.S. and one of the biggest in the world despite objections from conservationists who say it will destroy thousands of acres of habitat critical to the survival of the threatened...
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FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2015 file photo firefighters from the University of Alaska (Fairbanks) watch as a wildfire slowly creeps toward their fire break near Chelan, Wash. Newly released national plans for fighting wildfires during the coronavirus pandemic are hundreds of pages long but don't offer many details on how fire managers will get access to COVID-19 tests or exactly who will decide when a crew needs to enter quarantine. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson,File)
May 11, 2020 - 5:19 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — In new plans that offer a national reimagining of how to fight wildfires amid the risk of the coronavirus spreading through crews, it's not clear how officials will get the testing and equipment needed to keep firefighters safe in what’s expected to be a difficult fire season. A...
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In this Saturday May 2, 2020 photo flamingos fly in Narta Lagoon, about 140 kilometers (90 miles) southwest of the Albanian capital of Tirana. Home confinement rules have angered and anguished some people in Albania, but humans getting their wings clipped during the coronavirus pandemic is allowing flamingos and other birds to flourish in a coastal lagoon by the Adriatic Sea. (AP Photo/Hektor Pustina)
May 10, 2020 - 6:09 am
NARTA, Albania (AP) — Home confinement rules have upset some people in Albania, but humans getting their wings clipped during the coronavirus pandemic has allowed flamingos and other birds to flourish in a coastal lagoon by the Adriatic Sea. Local officials and residents say the flamingo population...
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FILE - In this May 4, 2020, file photo, Park ranger Tyler Gagat wears a protective face mask as he monitors activity at the Flamingo boat ramp during the new coronavirus pandemic in Everglades National Park in Florida, as the park gradually reopens to the public in phases. As the coronavirus pandemic continues, the National Park Service is testing public access at several parks across the nation (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
May 09, 2020 - 7:32 pm
BRYCE CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Utah (AP) — After closing amid the coronavirus pandemic, the National Park Service is testing public access at several parks across the nation, including two in Utah, with limited offerings and services. Visitor centers and campgrounds remain largely shuttered at Bryce...
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FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2012, file photo, Roy Horn, of Siegfried & Roy, arrives at the Keep Memory Alive 16th Annual "Power of Love Gala," honoring Muhammad Ali with his 70th birthday celebration in Las Vegas. Horn, one half of the longtime Las Vegas illusionist duo Siegfried & Roy, died of complications from the coronavirus, Friday, May 8, 2020. He was 75. (AP Photo/Jeff Bottari, File)
May 09, 2020 - 3:23 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Roy Horn of Siegfried & Roy, the duo whose extraordinary magic tricks astonished millions until Horn was critically injured in 2003 by one of the act’s famed white tigers, has died. He was 75. Horn died of complications from the coronavirus on Friday in a Las Vegas hospital,...
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FILE - In this April 23, 2020, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a researcher holds a dead Asian giant hornet in Blaine, Wash. FILE - This Dec. 30, 2019 photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture shows a dead Asian giant hornet in a lab in Olympia, Wash. It is the world's largest hornet, a 2-inch long killer with an appetite for honey bees. Dubbed the "Murder Hornet" by some, the insect has a sting that could be fatal to some humans. (Karla Salp/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP)
May 07, 2020 - 6:10 pm
Insect experts say people should calm down about the big bug with the nickname “murder hornet” — unless you are a beekeeper or a honeybee. The Asian giant hornets found in Washington state that grabbed headlines this week aren’t big killers of humans, although it does happen on rare occasions. But...
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FILE - In this April 17, 2020, file photo, an oil rig stands against the setting sun in Midland, Texas. Texas regulators are relaxing rules about where companies can store oil underground, raising concern among environmentalists about potential groundwater contamination and other dangers. (Odessa American/Eli Hartman, File)
May 05, 2020 - 6:44 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Texas regulators are relaxing rules about where companies can store oil underground, raising concern among environmentalists about potential groundwater contamination and other dangers. The members of the Railroad Commission of Texas voted Tuesday to allow companies to store oil...
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In this Dec. 30, 2019, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a dead Asian giant hornet is photographed in a lab in Olympia, Wash. The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch long killer with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state and entomologists are making plans to wipe it out. Dubbed the "Murder Hornet" by some, the Asian giant hornet has a sting that could be fatal to some humans. It is just now starting to emerge from hibernation. (Quinlyn Baine/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP)
May 04, 2020 - 10:21 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch killer dubbed the "Murder Hornet" with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state, where entomologists were making plans to wipe it out. The giant Asian insect, with a sting that could be fatal to some people, is just...
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FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2015 file photo, Muslim pilgrims shelter themselves from the heat as they attend Friday afternoon prayers outside the Grand Mosque in the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia. A new study released Monday, May 4, 2020, says 2 to 3.5 billion people in 50 years will be living in a climate that historically has proven just too hot to handle. Currently about 20 million people live in places with an annual average temperature greater than 84 degrees (29 degrees Celsius) — far beyond the temperature sweet spot. That area is less than 1% of the Earth’s land, and it is mostly near the Sahara Desert and includes Mecca, Saudi Arabia. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy, File)
May 04, 2020 - 3:18 pm
KENSINGTON, Maryland (AP) — In just 50 years, 2 billion to 3.5 billion people, mostly the poor who can’t afford air conditioning, will be living in a climate that historically has been too hot to handle, a new study said. With every 1.8 degree (1 degree Celsius) increase in global average annual...
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